Masonite Hardboard - which blade to use



I'm waiting for one of my old posts to be dredged up so I can finally finish that project! I've got a score of unfinished projects just waiting for someone to reply and give me that last crucial opinion!
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wrote:

Or he's twisting the saw.
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On Monday, February 27, 2017 at 1:50:05 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

I'll bet his arm is real tired by now. ;-)
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On Mon, 27 Feb 2017 18:18:09 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Could be. I can't see the OP's post.
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Haven't had this problem myself but I typically use a table saw. If I was having this prob, I would first get something sacrifical I can put under it, maybe an old piece of 3/4 ply. Then make a zero clearance cutting runway I can lay on top. Again, maybe a 6" wide piece of anything with a fence of 3/4 stock screwed along one side. One cut with the worm saw sets the width. Now drop the runway on top of the masonite, on top of the sacrificial. Set the depth to cut maybe 1/8" into the sacrifical. Now the masonite is sandwiched between those and the cut should be clean.

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I built one of those guides by gluing a lone 4" strip of 11-ply wood (some expensive scrap found outside a sign shop [trash] in Florida years ago) onto a strip of 15" wide Masonite, then running the worm drive along the plywood edge to create a saw guide as long/longer as the boards to be cut.
The first time we tried this, I laid several rough cut 2 by's across two saw horses and laid the Masonite on top of them. This time, the saw horses were arranged so that too much of the Masonite hung unsupported and I added OSB under the sheet to be cut as both a support and sacrificial board.
I didn't recall as much difficulty the first time as I had this time. But the wife says we had smoke then, too.
Thanks for the Feedback.
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The saw blade is taper ground. Set it deep and it'll be hitting at just the front and back edges. Set it shallow, and it will hit all along the buried edge. So it heats up, which is what made it wavy. Expansion slots would help, but I'll bet it doesn't have them.
Good part is that once it cooled down it was probably as good as new.
Run it deeper, and try to keep it in a straight line.
John Martin
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Run it deeper, and try to keep it in a straight line.> John Martin
Makes sense. I'll definitely try that on this last cut with the carbide blade.
Thanks
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On Tue, 25 Aug 2009 11:56:15 -0700 (PDT), Hoosierpopi

I don't think the blade has anything to do with a "wavy cut." Most likely, your tablesaw would benefit from a tuneup. Make absolutely sure the miter slot is parallel to the blade and to the fence. If it is off 1/64", that's too much and you will get poor cuts and increase the chance of kickback. Also use an outfeed table, rollers or another person at the back to support the stock. Always keep your eye on the fence, making sure the boards are tightly against the fence at all times.
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Phisherman wrote:

He's not cutting with a table saw--he mentioned a worm drive Skilsaw.
If he's going to cut Masonite that way I think he needs to clamp it between two stiffer boards if he dosn't have a flat table to lay it on.
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If he's going to cut Masonite that way I think he needs to clamp it between two stiffer boards if he dosn't have a flat table to lay it on.
He sure is - no other reasonable option.
The sheets at 63" wide and about nine feet long.
They were free, but show some wear and tear at the edges.
They are heavy, bulky and difficult to move about - now in top garage, cutting in barn, my TS is in basement, finished boards are for the barn.
I think that "deep cut" advice may prove the solution. It was avoided because I had stacked all eight sheets onto the sawhorses used to support my cutting operations (cut the short dimension of all eight at once since all were to be cut to the same length) and worried about nicking the second sheet as I cut through the first. I set the depth of cut as shallow as I could.
Like I said, I'll have to reset the depth and have another whack at the task.
Thanks for the feedback.
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"your tablesaw would benefit from a tuneup."
Thanks, but I'm using a hand-held 7.25" Worm Drive Skill Saw on this project.
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