Re: OT: trucks

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You can't haul 12 foot boards in a 5'+ bed, which is a common length for hardwood lumber. And you can't haul a motorcycle. In fact, there's lots of things which are more or less inconvenient in a extra-short bed truck.
John
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On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 03:29:40 GMT, Lew Hodgett

I just ordered an '05 Tacoma. Let's hope they still make 'em like my old Toys.
Barry
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wrote:

It won't help with a motorcycle, but hardwood, conduit, and pipe is moved nicely with a removable ladder rack. In fact, the Weather Guard Weekender: <http://www.americanladders.com/truck_racks.html and many of the track racks: <http://www.worktrucksupply.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=TT&Category_Code=tracrac come on and off of the vehicle in seconds. They work great for canoes and larger kayaks as well, which still are a pain in an 8' bed. Either rack will work with 5, 6 or 8 foot beds.
I have always had 6' beds, as that's as long as Toyota and Nissan have recently made them on compact trucks, and the rack is essential. I've always needed good mileage when the truck is empty, or lightly loaded, so full size never fit my plan.
A motorcycle, mower, or other small motor vehicle fits nicely in my 5x10' box trailer, and it's MUCH easier to load. After owning a trailer, I'd never go back to getting power equipment up into a pickup! <G>
FWIW, My Subaru Outback has hauled plenty of hardwood, including 10' boards INSIDE with all the doors shut. 12 footers go on the roof rack. While I would personally pass on an extra short bed truck, there's ways to accessorize them to conveniently haul a lot of stuff.
You payz your money...
Barry
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wrote:

I used to ask the same question. I had an E350 14' cube van and a Mitsubishi like the Isuzu you write about.
I drove the Japanese truck once and it became bell clear why those things pretty much killed off the American cube van. Now the Sprinter (which is what, European Mercedes with a Dodge or Freightliner badge?) is doing the same to the typical full-size trade van.
One day, American vehicle manufacturers will put more emphasis on actually _designing_ revolutionary trucks, rather than spending all their money _telling_ us how "professional grade" they are. <G>
Barry
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"Ba r r y" wrote in message

Hey, not fair! ... after all, they actually have "real 'steel alloy' bolts holding the bed to the frame", and they think it's such an important feature that they design an entire TV advertising campaign around the fact.
Can you imagine, REAL "steel alloy" bolts??
... that's how stupid they think you are.
--
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Swingman responds:

Hey, not fair! ... after all, they actually have "real 'steel alloy' bolts holding the bed to the frame", and they think it's such an important feature that they design an entire TV advertising campaign around the fact.
Can you imagine, REAL "steel alloy" bolts??
... that's how stupid they think you are.<<
Or, that is how stupid the people in the ad department and agency REALLY are.
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I was waiting for the company pickup to be inspected yesterday and was BSing with the sales manager. He got delivery on the first Avalanche truck about a month after they were introduced. He figured it would be gone in a matter of days, what with all the advertising hype. Plenty of people stopped and looked at it, admired it, but did not buy it. He though they'd make a premium and ended up letting it go for less than he'd make on a Silverado. In spite of the hype, people mostly still tend to buy what then really need in a truck.
He also had an SSR and it did not move fast either. They will only sell them with an order, none will be brought in for spec.
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They're preferable to MAN-MADE "steel alloy" bolts, aren't they? *snicker*
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I'm surprised they haven't decided to make certain bolts optional, available as part of the "professional" package.
Barry
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As the OP of this thread, I'd thought I'd let you know how its going. The only vehicles we've found that meet our needs is a Dodge Ram 1500 crew cab, with 77K miles, and a chrysler town and country LXi with 57K miles. Both are 2002's, both have "sale" prices of 15K. We thought about buying a trailer for the van, as its "too nice" to haul sheet goods and the like. We'd need a topper for the truck, so the extra expense is a wash.
Our big concern is the high miles both. We are going to look some more at vehicles with higher prices, hoping to find lower miles and that the bank will give use the extra money.
what to do, what to do??
John
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"High miles"?
Cars have changed. Sixty thousand miles is just starting to reach the "settled in" point. I bought a 2000 GMC van last spring, with 67,000 miles on it. It's a full size conversion van, tricked out with leather, LCD screen, and all the goodies. I didn't hesitate at $14,900; didn't even haggle on the price. I expect this van to continue running like a top for at least 100,000 more miles.
In 1997, I bought a 1996 Chevy Lumina sedan with 79k miles on it. Today, with 215,000 miles, it's still my daily commuter. A bad thing happened to the transmission (unrelated to mileage), but other than that, my only repairs have been to replace the water pump about six months ago, and the A/C compressor (mandatory in Texas) at 175k miles.
Honestly, unless it's been used hard or abused, then anything under 90,000 miles just means you're taking advantage of someone else's lost depreciation.
Kevin
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John T>

All such bets are off in the rust belt.
Not to mention being simplistic elsewhere. 30K on Dallas freeways is a lot more hours than 100K of my driving, where there are five possible places where I might be obliged to slow or stop in the 37 miles to work.
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I always thought "Rust Belt" referred to the areas that held America's lost steel industry, not that things actually rusted more in a certain area. <G>
It's strange how geography changes the meaning of things.
Barry
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"Ba r r y" wrote in message

Yep ... when used in reference to automobiles, I always thought of it as those areas where it was common to salt the roads in the winter.
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Two things...I do live in the rust belt (southern WI), and I put a higher number of miles per year than average, about 17-18K. My minivan reached 159,000 miles before the tranny and power steering gave out, which is the reason why I'm looking.
Both vehicles are local trades.
John
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If it was a Chrysler product, you should have been on your third tranny.
My last 600K have been on three past and one current (30K) Ranger. Big pieces begin to fall off about year eight or nine, but our salt season is longer and more intense than yours.
18K/annum? I know folks who do that on snow machines....
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George wrote:

If you want an argument, change the subject<G>.

When I lived in the rust belt, would get a new vehicle, drive it 60,000 miles to the nearest junk yard and get in the next new car the dealer had waiting for me.
Here in SoCal, at 95,000, the little Tonka Toy finally got a set of front brakes and some plugs the other day.
Road salt and cold weather have a major impact on vehicle longevity.

Here in SoCal, a commute of 50-100 miles each way is no big news, thus 30K-60K miles per year is NBD.
Lew
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On Sun, 13 Mar 2005 23:25:00 GMT, Lew Hodgett
Agree on salt, but not on cold weather. We are driving a 1986 Volks Jetta (250k klicks) and a 1990 Chevy C2500 4X4 (200k klicks). The Jetta stopped rusting when it moved to the Yukon in 1990 from New Brunswick. The pickup has no rust at all, having lived in the Yukon all its life.
The trick is to use the garage for what it was intended: a workshop (OBWW). So no melting/freezing cycles if you leave them outside. Like Charlie Self says, that's why cars are painted so well.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html
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wrote:

================== My neighbor is (or was until he retired last year) the Factory Rep for General Motors.... The General now designs their engines to last for 300,000 miles... under normal use... that is not saying you will get that many miles but in the 60's and 70's they were expected (not designed to last under 100,000 miles...)
My Wives 96 Caranan now is getting close to 200,000 miles on it and I will admit that it may use 1/2 quart of oil between its 3000-4000 mile oil changes,.... who cares !
My interests are in Corvettes and 60 era GM muscle cars (5 Corvettes and a Chevelle are in the garage now...)... Rebuilding those engines is very possible for under $2,500 but normally 3,000 will get you a real nice rebuild... Heck a 350 Hp zz4 SB can be purchased for $3,500 with a new engine waranty right at the parts counter of any Chevy dealer...I can pull out the old and put in the new engine in a weekend without any trouble..could do it in a single day honestly... with a little help from my son ....
What I am saying is I do not take the milage as any big factor in buying a vehicle ...I will NOT pay a premium for a low milage vehicle...just not worth it ... in my opinion...
Just my thoughts...
Bob Griffiths
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It is not the miles, it is how the miles were driven. I've gone back to using my '91 Regal for my daily commute because I want to get some use before it rots away. Only 142,000 and runs as good as the day it was new. It is on the second set of plugs though. The original were replaced at about 85,000 miles. Still has the original exhaust on it also. It lacks some of the fancy goodies that my new car has, but I still like the way this one handles and rides. Best part is it has been paid for over 10 years now. Lots of highway miles.
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