RE: Neat Jig Courtesy of WoodSmithShop

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A jig for ripping narrow strips on a T/S.
Lew
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It is cool but after seeing it some time back I decided to go with the Rockler jig which is essentially the same and only $15. I think I am ahead on that one.
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"Leon" wrote:

Their current version is $24 which is still not bad, but that takes all the fun out of it.
Lew
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Inflation takes the fun out of everything. ;~(
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Leon wrote:

So does deflation, or so I'm told anyway.
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Leon wrote:

Getting an RAS before a table saw has me _so_ spoiled . . .
If they aren't longer than the stroke of the saw, strips like that are trivial on an RAS.
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J. Clarke wrote:

Even if the are longer, you can turn it to rip mode, run the first strip, then use that strip and a space on the fence to run the next.
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-MIKE- wrote:

That's a lot less trivial though.
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J. Clarke wrote:

Oh, you're going for trivial? I gots me plenty of that. I'm pastor of that church. :-)
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Define a "space", width of the blade? Does that space not increase the width of the blade with each pass of the board?
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Leon wrote:

Brainfart.
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I am just the opposite, I basically built a house full of furniture with my RAS. 4 years later I bought a TS and never used the RAS again. Sold the RAS 3 years later and have never regretted it. About 10 years ago I added a 12" CMS and stand for long pieces, it now sets in the store room, seldom used.

So you are ripping in the cross cut position? Can you explain how it is easier to rip narrower pieces on the RAS
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Leon wrote:

(1) clamp a piece of scrap to the fence--cut. That gives you a reference surface at the cut line. (2) put a spacer of the appropriate thickness at the other end of the scrap. If no spacer, then set a caliper to the required thickness and use it for the spacer. (3) Clamp a scrap on the other side of the spacer. (4) Remove spacer, move original scrap and reclamp. (5) Put stock against end of clamped scrap. (6) Cut (7) remove piece that was cut. (8) Until done, GOTO 5.
Other than the saw, the only jigging you need is a couple of clamps, a piece of scrap, and something to set the thickness by.
It takes longer to describe than to do.
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I'm sure and I under stand the concept.
Are you ripping strips in the cross cut set up position? If so, what holds the stock once it becomes 3/4 wide or narrower?
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Leon wrote:

Yep.
Another scrap with a rabbet sized to the thickness of the stock.
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Yeah cool concept but I have been using my combo square to do the same thing for 20 years since shown by an ole timer. I just use it to set the fence. You just put the cast edge in the slot and adjust the rule to extend over to where you want it. Once set to the right poaition you just hook it in the slot, slide the board and fence to touch. Lock the fence, set the square aside. Rip, rinse and repeat.
Also, I don't really like the concept of the material being pinched from two sides on a tables saw. I rarely use feathers for the same reason. Just looks too tempting to create a bind and kick back..

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SonomaProducts.com wrote:

Different strokes, but I don't understand the problem?
Properly used (in front of the blade) there should be no issue with a feather board on a TS. Been using feather boards on table saws for 40 years ... there are just too many applications where using one is like having an extra hand, often increasing safety instead of detracting from it.
If for some reason there could be a problem with wood closing up on the back of the blade (case hardened material, reaction wood), you should be using a splitter in any event.
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Yes of course in front of the the blade. I do on occasion use them and have never seen a problem. It is just an emotional thing. I have a rule that when my balls start to crawl up inside during any operation, I listen to them and find a different way to do the operation and for some reason the look of that setup always bugs me.

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SonomaProducts.com wrote:

LOL ... know the feeling. It used to be quite routine when I was still using one of those $15, aluminum, taper jigs to taper table legs.
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Yes of course in front of the the blade. I do on occasion use them and have never seen a problem. It is just an emotional thing. I have a rule that when my balls start to crawl up inside during any operation, I listen to them and find a different way to do the operation and for some reason the look of that setup always bugs me.
Actually the rip jig is impossible to use if positioned anywhere past the the front of the blade. It absolutely has to be positioned in front of the blade to function as intended.
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