Raised panel doors

Working on a hard maple dining room buffet that will have two doors, each about 17" square. I usually opt for floating plywood panels, but would like to try raised floating panels for this project. Router table or TS? I don't have a panel bit, but willing to make the investment. A bit concerned about the safety of the cut on the TS. Thoughts?
Larry
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On 12/26/2012 9:51 PM, Gramp's shop wrote:

about 17" square. I usually opt for floating plywood panels, but would like to try raised floating panels for this project. Router table or TS? I don't have a panel bit, but willing to make the investment. A bit concerned about the safety of the cut on the TS. Thoughts?

Either way Larry,
The TS is not very difficult or dangerous. I would put a raised fence on your fence for support and a raised feather board to keep it against the fence above the blade. I don't but it will protect your fingers.
If I cut on the ts, I use a handscrew on the top of the raised fence, attached to the panel, it prevents me from slipping out and away. I also feather right before the blade.
As for router bits, you can, and I do also, but it takes much longer. You need to sneak up on the finished cuts. Take 1/8 at a time. Process the endgrain first, then long grain. It pays to have a backer for the endgrain,
You have way more options with a router bit, but you need to slow the speed down quite a bit.
Practice first, then go for it. Make sure you use a zero clearance insert on your fence, it helps to keep it cleaner.
Whatever you choose, you can't go wrong. Base it on the look you want. Do you plan on backcutting? You don't need a dedicated panel bit that back cuts. I don't back cut, but if I had to, I would just use a rabbet bit, a mortise bit, or even a dishing bit (bowl /tray bit).
Experiment, relax.
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Gramp's shop wrote:

about 17" square. I usually opt for floating plywood panels, but would like to try raised floating panels for this project. Router table or TS? I don't have a panel bit, but willing to make the investment. A bit concerned about the safety of the cut on the TS. Thoughts?

Larry, I have been reading about this stuff. Did you know that besides a bevel cut, that you can achieve a cove cut (pretty much the same way we discussed making crown) on a tablesaw? My reading suggested not using square doors and going with a ratioof 5:3 or someother ratio of integers besides 1:1. Maybe this should be discounted since you'll have 2 doors side-by-side. Ihope you'll proceed with this project, then I can get the benefit of your experience! : )
Cheers, Bill
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Gramp's shop wrote:

about 17" square. I usually opt for floating plywood panels, but would like to try raised floating panels for this project. Router table or TS? I don't have a panel bit, but willing to make the investment. A bit concerned about the safety of the cut on the TS. Thoughts?

http://www.finehomebuilding.com/how-to/departments/building-skills/making-a-raised-panel-shaker-cabinet-door-on-a-tablesaw.aspx
Larry, You might enjoy the link above. With a little more effort you might be able to make one with a cove rather than a bevel cut.
Bill
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Gramp's shop wrote:

If you fix your panel to a bench and use waste stock to encapsulate it (same thickness as your panel you dont need a router table.
Just take small slices over several passes and dont force the machine
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On 12/26/2012 8:51 PM, Gramp's shop wrote:

about 17" square. I usually opt for floating plywood panels, but would like to try raised floating panels for this project. Router table or TS? I don't have a panel bit, but willing to make the investment. A bit concerned about the safety of the cut on the TS. Thoughts?

Either will work however you have a much much greater choice of profiles going with the router bit. And if you go with a router bit you are absolutely going to want to be spinning a 1/2" shank bit.
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Larry, I did all of my kitchen cabinets with raised panels (with a cove) on the TS. You'll need to secure a fence at a 45 degree angle to blade. Push each panel thru slowly, raising the blade after each pass around the panels. The end-grain may require additional sanding to get rid of the cut marks.
Robin
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rlz wrote:

if the end grain needs additional sanding your using the wrong cutter or the cutters blunt.
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Thanks for the good tips. I'm going to use the TS and have a good plan for securing the piece. Will post results.
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