Radial arm saw versus 12" compund sliding miter saw question.

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The corollary, which is more appropriate here, is that if anything can be adjusted it needs to be. A RAS is nothing but a pile of adjustments.
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Leon wrote:

I had this happen many times with my old Monkey Wards RAS. I was able to reduce it with proper tensioning of the motor guides and the straight arm pull through technique and negative hook blade. My current Searz RAS with the "control cut" motorized feed cable along with the other techniques has completely eliminated any climb during a cross cut.
This repeated

It can sure knock it out of alignment.

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My Old Craftsman RAS was a 1978 model and I noticed in later years the electronic adjustments were added to some models and the control cut. Does the control cut actually feed the motor and blade or does it regulate the rate of speed that you pull?
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Leon wrote:

adjustable with a thumb wheel. It also retracts the motor if you let go of the motor. The motor on/off switch is on the end of the arm, and the control cut activation trigger switch is on the motor handle. You can't move the motor outward without pulling the trigger and then only at the rate set by the thumb wheel.
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Sort of like a drag on a fishing reel? I can see how that could have been handy.
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On Mon, 7 Dec 2009 07:05:54 -0600, the infamous "Leon"

With a RAS, climb cutting is a reality. With a SCMS, the blade comes down and is pushed into the board at the opposite angle, preventing any binding that happens on a RAS.
BTW, I uses a RAS for the very first time last week, after my client doused my little chop saw with the hose.
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krw wrote:

1. Set depth-of-cut on SCMS so blade doesn't cut through wood but cuts to dado depth. 2. Set start/stop blocks to limit width of dado 3. Run multiple passes between start/stop to clear out dado.
~Mark.
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wrote:

Depth of cut adjustment?
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Most major brand SCMS have a dept of cut adjustment so that the blade will only go down a predetermined distance.
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Item 1.4 on this pdf http://www.festoolusa.com/media/pdf/kapex_ks_120.pdf
Page 7, stopper Arm http://www.makita.com/en-us/Assets/Images/Products/LS1214L/owners_manuals/LS1214L_OM.pdf
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Festool will do anything for a grand.

Intended to keep the blade out of the base (to prevent metal on metal - a handy thing), not as a dado depth adjustment. I know I'd I'd never trust dados on a SCMS.
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----- Original Message -----
Newsgroups: rec.woodworking Sent: Monday, December 07, 2009 6:59 AM Subject: Re: Radial arm saw versus 12" compund sliding miter saw question.

Festool will do anything for a grand.
This is not uncommon and just because Festool is exspensice does not discredit the fact that many sliders have this feature.

Intended to keep the blade out of the base (to prevent metal on metal - a handy thing), not as a dado depth adjustment. I know I'd I'd never trust dados on a SCMS.
No, the stoper arm is for control of cut depth. Look again. There are two boss locations. One is absolutely to limit the ultimate blade depth, the swing out thumb screw adjustable bolt is for adjusting the depth of cut.
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wrote:

I use that function regularly, as I will take a 1x or 3/4 ply long ripper and use it like a table (I have my SCMS set up in a holder with a wood/laminate support on either side, so I can securely attach a temporary "table" if I need to) and, naturally, don't want to cut through it. I've also done a quick dado or two or three...nothing really precise, gate stuff and such...
cg

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Now that I have a cabinet saw I get great cross cut results and my CMS seldom sees any action any more. If I were to upgrade to a slider I make certain that it was one with a depth of cut stop.
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wrote:

...my shop is the size of a garage and my 66 takes up alot of space...I use the SCMS for bulk-cutting and the occasional miter, comes in really handy for "outside" work, it amounts to what my RAS would do if I had one (and it's on wheels)! When I do close-tolerance work I'll do my cross-cutting on the TS, most always...the depth stop on the SCMS comes in *very* handy. So much of my work is time related 'cause it's my business...
I love it when I get to play around, but it hardly ever happens...sniff...
cg
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Not in the case of Dewalt 718 as the base has a plastic insert and turns as you change the miter angle so there's no chance of hitting a metal base.
Owner manual: http://www.dewaltservicenet.com/documents/English/Instruction%20Manual/653515-00%20DW718.pdf
on page 9, column 3 refers to it as a "grooving stop" whose purpose is to limit the depth of a groove. Multiple grooves stopped at the same depth provide a dado.
~Mark.
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The manual on the Makita referenced above indicated that the control was for differing blade diameters rather than the miter angle (adjusting the thing for every angle would be a PITA).

I looked quickly at the DW717(?) but didn't see any mention of a depth stop. I've never used a decent SCMS, so didn't know about such a feature. I'd likely never use it, preferring either a table saw, router, or RAS, in that order.
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The manual on the Makita referenced above indicated that the control was for differing blade diameters rather than the miter angle (adjusting the thing for every angle would be a PITA).
Ummm... comprehension...
The manual you are refering to indicates the need to check the "Lower limit position" when installing a "new blade", not a smaller blade. That is the instruction for maintaining maximum cutting capacity. When an old blade is sharpened time and again it becomes slightly smaller in diameter. You need to readjust the maximum depth for maximum cutting capacity. That adjustment is for that particualr blade. When you put a new blade on it will be slightly larger and the adjustment will need to be performed again to maintain maximum cutting capacity.
Farther down where I referred is the Stopper Arm instruction. This shows the swing the arm with thumb screw and how to adjust for different depths of cut.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Not in the case of Dewalt 718 as the base has a plastic insert and turns as you change the miter angle so there's no chance of hitting a metal base.
Owner manual: http://www.dewaltservicenet.com/documents/English/Instruction%20Manual/653515-00%20DW718.pdf
on page 9, column 3 refers to it as a "grooving stop" whose purpose is to limit the depth of a groove. Multiple grooves stopped at the same depth provide a dado.
~Mark.
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snip

http://www.dewaltservicenet.com/documents/English/Instruction%20Manual/653515-00%20DW718.pdf
Keith would do well to get out more and look at the tools.
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