Quick inlay technique

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First, you rout out the pattern you want. Make sure you use the square-corner bit. Then fill with inlay.
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/Scoop1.jpg
Then, sand smooth.
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/Flushsand.jpg
Presto!
r
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On Jan 28, 10:39 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Angela is pretty good with that stuff, eh? (better than I am at changing log-ins.)
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Robatoy wrote:

Did this go over my head?
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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If it did, we're the same height.
jc
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Joe wrote:

LOL!
--
"Our beer goes through thousands of quality Czechs every day."
(From a Shiner Bock billboard I saw in Austin some years ago)
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Can't get a square corner with a spinning router bit!
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I think it might be a chisel. :-)
I do have the Whiteside inlay kit. It has a small diameter bit, but not that small.
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Lowell Holmes wrote:

Think V-bit - the square corner is cut by raising the bit so that the point cuts the right angle. It (almost) requires CNC control.
Next up, I'd like to see that same inlay pattern with a slight undercut to give the inlay material a better chance to hold. :)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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It's a technique called V-Bit carving. Works marvellously well. Especially when one imitates a raised-panel door in MDF and then vacuum-forms a sheet of polyvinyl over the door. But, alas, I have said too much.
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Robatoy wrote:

It's a technique called V-Bit carving. Works marvellously well. Especially when one imitates a raised-panel door in MDF and then vacuum-forms a sheet of polyvinyl over the door. But, alas, I have said too much.
I have seen that technique used with a top tapered pilot bearing v-bit and templates that narrow near the locations that you want pointy corners or ends. Essentially the bit raises up at the corner. CMT sells the set to do this. http://www.cmtutensili.com/show_items.asp?pars=PJJ~RCS~2
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I don't recognize the wood - what species is it?
R
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It is called Biscayne Blue. It adorns many wonderful wooden vanities and kitchen cabinets. Now, with the inlay technique, one can enhance a theme, being perhaps a Harvey Ellis style or Greene and Greene. The inlays can be derived from any image, in a multitude of colours. A floral pattern could augment a cabriolet leg, for instance.
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Sooooo.. Is it a "solid surface" material of some sort ???
Robatoy wrote:

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Yes it is. A mixture of ATH and acrylic. Traded under the names of Corian, Staron, Meganite etc. This particular colour is made by Meganite.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

That is like when I did my first Standard Deviation on a digital calculator, I felt that someway I was cheating.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Do you then coat the surface with something?
We have some old resin type tops in our bathrooms that we have been thinking of refinishing. Could this technique be used in conjunction with refinishing?
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No, it will be polished, however. Now you resin-type countertops can be gel-coat with man-made marble underneat. Refinishing those is difficult. If there is a thick coating on top, then it can be polished with automotive compounds. It's Polyester.
Other resin-types can be polyester all the way through. Those can be sanded and polished; refinished till they look new.
One way to tell is to look underneath. If it feels/looks chalky.. it is most likely gel-coat.
If your top has an integral sink, and it shows cracks around the drain, it is not repairable.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote in

so what are you filling with?
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Component % (w/w) LD50 LC50 Exposure Limits Methyl Methacrylate Monomer CAS No 80-62-6 38-48 7940 mg/kg (rat/oral) 7093ppm (rat/ 4hr) ACGIH1 TLV-TWA: 50 ppm Carcinogen A4, Sensitizer ACGIH STEL: 100 ppm
Part B Component % (w/w) LD50 LC50 Exposure Limits Benzoyl Peroxide2 (Active O2 < 1.0%) CAS No 94-36-0 2-4 7710 mg/kg (rat/oral) N. Av. ACGIH TLV: 5 mg/m3 Dibutyl Phthalate CAS No 84-74-2 5-10 800 mg/kg (rat/oral) 12500 mg/m3 (mouse /4hr) ACGIH TLV: 5 mg/m3 Reaction product of Epichlorohydrin and Bisphenol A CAS No 25085-99-8 75-90 11400 mg/kg (rat/oral) N. Av. N. Established
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Component % (w/w) LD50 LC50 Exposure Limits Methyl Methacrylate Monomer CAS No 80-62-6 38-48 7940 mg/kg (rat/oral) 7093ppm (rat/ 4hr) ACGIH1 TLV-TWA: 50 ppm Carcinogen A4, Sensitizer ACGIH STEL: 100 ppm
Part B Component % (w/w) LD50 LC50 Exposure Limits Benzoyl Peroxide2 (Active O2 < 1.0%) CAS No 94-36-0 2-4 7710 mg/kg (rat/oral) N. Av. ACGIH TLV: 5 mg/m3 Dibutyl Phthalate CAS No 84-74-2 5-10 800 mg/kg (rat/oral) 12500 mg/m3 (mouse /4hr) ACGIH TLV: 5 mg/m3 Reaction product of Epichlorohydrin and Bisphenol A CAS No 25085-99-8 75-90 11400 mg/kg (rat/oral) N. Av. N. Established
Ohhhh..... *THAT* stuff.... I think I have some behind the 5 year old garnet shellac in the finish cabinet.
jc
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