Questions About Gorilla Glue

Page 1 of 3  

I've never used Gorilla Glue. I have a couple of questions.
1. Is Gorilla Glue gap filling?
2. Can you use Gorilla Glue for biscuit joints?
3. I'd also be interested in anyone's comments and/or warnings.
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
GrayFox (in snipped-for-privacy@comcast.dca.giganews.com) said:
| I've never used Gorilla Glue. I have a couple of questions. | | 1. Is Gorilla Glue gap filling? Yes, when used as directed it foams and expands.
| 2. Can you use Gorilla Glue for biscuit joints? I've never used it for that - but would suppose so.
| 3. I'd also be interested in anyone's comments and/or warnings. Cleans up nicely with paper towel and acetone.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Morris Dovey wrote:

Leaving a bunch of air holes. It is not gap filling in the sense I suspect OP means.
I would say the answer to the question is "no".

Certainly? However, it's only real advantage is the waterproof result.

Makes a hell of a mess and takes several hours clamping time to cure. Will not work as a "slide 'n glide" joint w/o clamping for things like corner blocks, etc., like white or yellow glues can.
Harder than a rock once dry so cleanup is a bitch. Having to use a solvent is a pita (as compared to water).
Has no real advantage and many disadvantages other than for the waterproof nature or for some oily woods such as teak, etc., which don't work well w/ other types.
Three times the cost roughly of yellow aliphatic, roughly twice the cost of Type III waterproof. Type II is in between Type I and III for cost.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No Gorilla glue is not harder than a rock when dry. It is VERY Easily chiseled, scraped or sanded.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

OK, so I exaggerated... :) I don't much care for the stuff so I got carried away--don't suppose you could tell, though! :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well I can attest that it is a product that requires more attention. LOL
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not after it is dry... At least not the stuff I used on my motorcycle gas tank... :)
Expansion... the stuff REALLY grows as it hardens...
--


Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes absolutely it is. BUT is does not add any strength to the joint at that point. This type glue foams and expands and will fill voids.

Probably not a good idea as biscuits need to expand as does the wood that you put the into. Gorilla glue does not have water in it but does cure faster if water is added. The more water you use the more foaming you will see and perhaps you will see a bigger mess.

Keep acetone handy to immediately remove the glue from you hands. Once cured it has to wear off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ummmm.... no, they don't "need to expand". Biscuits are principally for alignment, not structural strength, and as long as you get a snug fit in the slot, Gorilla Glue is just fine. In fact, you can make a case for Gorilla Glue being *superior* to PVA glues for biscuits, precisely because it does *not* make them expand -- just read the occasional thread here about biscuit-shaped *depressions* along a glue line (caused by sanding too soon after glue-up with a water-based glue) to understand why.

Unless you live in an _extremely_ arid climate, there's enough moisture present in the wood already for Gorilla Glue to cure, without need of adding any more.

Paint thinner (mineral spirits) works, too, and it's a lot cheaper than acetone.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That is the popular view but from the books that factually address biscuits alone they are indeed structural especially when used on 45 degree miters and on end grain applications such as when attaching shelves with biscuits to cabinet walls. They do indeed need to expand to make a solid and tight contact.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
GrayFox wrote:

IMHO, the stuff is strictly overpriced and under peckered.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Classic, LMAO. T
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
GrayFox wrote:

It will fill the gap but won't provide strength through the gap - if that makes any sense to you.

It could and would hold quite well, I imagine. However, proper application requires that you WET one side of the glue joint. What's that going to do to your biscuit. I guess the answer to this one is MAYBE

Cost vs benefit vs ease of use - Don't think I'd be using it to glue up panels. Any of the Tite-Bonds (or similar) would serve you as well and cheaper.
Haven't tested this out yet but supposedly Gorilla Glue has a 180 day shelf life after opening. I have had one open longer than that and it still appears usable.
Can anyone comment on that?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip>

I've had the poly glues from both Franklin (Titebond folks) and Probond (Elmer's?) go hard in the bottle, and get tossed, before I used more than a few ounces.
The only reason I buy this type at all is to glue the odd exotic...
Patriarch, with maybe 8 or 9 variations of adhesives on the shop shelf, but Original Titebond is the one I seem to reach for most.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 06 Sep 2005 01:13:05 -0500, Patriarch

I originally purchased Gorilla glue for use with melamine cabinets. Quickly became disenchanted with its exhorbitant cost and laughingly short shelf life.
Have since shifted to Roo Glue from Woodcraft. Excellent bonding properties, long shelf life, and is used exactly as you would any yellow glue. And did I mention that it's cheap?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This has been my experience too. It helps some to store the opened bottle upside down but it still goes bad before I get around to using it all.
I wish they would package it in a collapsible package, like a toothpaste tube, to keep the air/humidity out.
Art

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
GrayFox wrote:

IMHO any glue that is in liquid form has a decent bonding but when it comes to glue there ain't nothing better than Horse glue(bones),where you have to melt it in a pot.
Just my op. :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In other words, hide glue? Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Then don't waste your money. I've never made _anything_ with PU glue where I haven't regretted it afterwards, usually a year or two later when the joint fails.

No. it fills them, but there's no strength.

No. It would be a real nuisance to assemble and the lack of water would fail to swell the biscuits adequately.

Avoid the stuff. Gorilla is reputedly one of the good ones, but I won't touch PU woodworking glues again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
in

Andy, what do you use when you want a glue with a slower setup time? Every time David Marks is doing a complicated glueup he says use something with a longer working time and it sure looks like a bottle of Gorilla glue he's got there.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.