Question about using big panel raising bit


I am going to be spinning a horizontial panel raising bit (with a back cutter) in my shaper with a router collet. It is part of a door set and is 3 1/4" across. It has three wings, the safety type with infilled sections between the cutters, In the past I always cut rustic type raised panels on the TS with a standing jig, used flat panels or just purchased doors premade.
I am cutting pine panels and they are actually not glue-ups but wide 3/4" boards, a bunch of em.
I plan to do the panels in two passes.
I'll setup the fence so it is aligned with the bearing. Then before I run the first pass I'll attach some 1/8" ply to the face of the fence. Then I'll run all 4 sides of all panels cutting the raised profile almost complete depth. Then I'll remove the ply and run all the panels back through, trimming of the last 1/8" for a clean finish.
Do you think I can hog out that much on the first pass? I'm thinking maybe make my daughter try to push through the first piece while I stand across the shop, ready to call 911.
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"SonomaProducts.com" wrote:

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You scare the hell out of me, even if you limit the shaper RPM to 8,000 RPM.
I'd plan on at least 3, probably 4 passes including final clean up pass.
If you want a dose of reality, do the math on a 3-1/4" dia bit swinging at 8,000 RPM.
Over loading a cutter tip with to deep a cut under those conditions scary.
Just my $0.02 worth.
Lew
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> Over loading a cutter tip with to deep a cut under those conditions

This is why I was asking. I've seen several instructions that say to do one big pass and a second clean up pass. I was a bit worried about it.
Yes, I'll drop to the lowest speed. I guess I'll do multiple passes.
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Why not do the first pass on the saw? Be a lot safer.
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The profile is a little swoopy so can't really remove too much at a straight angle.
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<respectfully snipped>

Regardless of the species, it is always best to take a little at a time. 3-6 passes sometimes.
As you make your passes, always cut the cross-grain first. Sometimes, it is good to put a sacrificial piece of lumber at the end of the cut to prevent tear-out.
Even with a powerfeed, taking out too much at one time is hard on your cutters (or bits). Your risk of tearout is also greater with big bites. If you are not using a feeder, you will have greater control with small bites.
Always use a jig to hold the workpiece firmly down while cutting smaller pieces. (or use your miter gauge)
Remember that if you are using a back cutter, that you must keep the workpiece from coming up and changing the edge thickness with successive cuts. (this is not a critical point)
If you are using a router table, it seems that you could move the fence instead of using spacers.. though I have done so myself in weird cases. (I am really unqualified to say anything about router tables, since I never owned one... I may make one some day).
Make sure that your bit is sharp and you will get a smoother cut.
Lew Hodgett has some good advice.
Have a good day. woodstuff
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> If you are using a router table, it seems that you could move the fence

Yeah, very familiar with cutting cross grain first and I will use some backing to avoid blow-out.
I prefer to use spacers. I can do a test piece and dial in the final location of the fence and lock it down. I do this on lots of ops because I do long runs, 30-50 pieces and might need to do 20 complete, then come back and do the next 20, etc.
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(I
The only thing I might add is that with softer woods, incl. pine, it is always good to not slow down so you don't burn the panels. You can go slowly on all but the last cut, but then do that last little bit with a good even speed. You probably already knew this much. On hardwoods, it is harder to burn sometimes. IMHO.
But I've been spoiled by a power feeders on my sticking and panel-raising machines. Before that, I shoved it all through by hand on only one old Delta shaper.
Also, in recent years, I started planing down my panels to 5/8" and not using a back cutter. This is not necessarily the best way, but it works. For flat panel doors, I started raising the panel and inserting the raised side on the backside (only on high-end jobs). I did a kitchen in QS White oak and put in plywood panels and it looked crappy to me; I won't do that again.
I hope your work turns out well.
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> But I've been spoiled by a power feeders on my sticking and panel- raising

Yeah, I look forward to getting some power feeders. I am trying to spin up a full time bidness but still do it all myself, on the side, in the garage. Once I hit real production it will soon be onto the 3 headed shaper with a feeder and another feeder for the TS, if not a gang saw.
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The final depth of your cut will be 1 15/16".

At least four passes would be better - and the speed should be about 8000 rpm.

In the past, for the first cut I've attached, 1/2" ply. Then, I used 1/4" ply, a piece of Formica laminate (~ 1/16") - and a final clean pass without a spacer. That gave me good results.
Cut the end grain first on each pass.

You can, but not for a good outcome.
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I method in a routher table with a the larger Triton router is to make 3~4 passes. However I raise the blade, IMHO less stress is applied to the tip of the cutter.
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However I raise the blade, IMHO less stress is applied to the tip

Yeah, but this has a back cutter so I need to go straight into the edge because I am cutting both faces at once, so I can't come up from one side.
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However I raise the blade, IMHO less stress is applied to the tip

Yeah, but this has a back cutter so I need to go straight into the edge because I am cutting both faces at once, so I can't come up from one side.
Oh yeah, I for got about that the back cutter, I knew there was a reason I prefer not to have a back cutter.
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Maybe I'll come to feel the same if I survive this project.
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On Thu, 19 Aug 2010 10:29:19 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com"

You _do_ have on your welder's leathers and the 6-ply aramid-belted apron when you're spinnin' that thing, right? Good.
-- We're all here because we're not all there.
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