PVA waterproof adhesive on MDF

Have a piece of oak veneered mdf that i wish to use to make a shelf along side the bath.
The oak veneer does not cover all the edges, so my plan is to seal the edges and to then use a ronseal quick drying water based matt varnish to paint the whole thing.
I can see that PVA is often advertised for use as a sealant. A little while ago I bought a tub of Wickes PVA water proof adhesive. It says not to glue two non porous materials that is subjected to wet. As an experiement I found soaking things with water makes the adhesive go soft again and come adrift.
So is this 'so called' waterproof adhesive suitable as a sealant on this mdf please. Or is PVA waterproof adhesive essentially different from PVA sealant and so not suitable to seal the mdf. thanks
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JWBH wrote: > Have a piece of oak veneered mdf that i wish to use to make a shelf along > side the bath. <snip>
Don't want to burst your bubble, but you can't get there from here.
Doesn't make any difference how you try to seal the MDF, my guess is that it will take about 6 months before the MDF starts swelling from water splash and high humidity in the bath room.
If you want an oak shelf, try oak veneer over a plywood core.
Lew
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thanks for the advice. as a matter of interest can this adhesive be used as a sealer generally?
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JWBH wrote:

Strictly a personal opinion.
Adhesives are adhesives, sealers are sealers.
Different horses for different courses.
Lew
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Talk to sign makers who do out-door stuff. They have tricks they use to seal MDF.
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Permanantly, or for a lifetime of say 5-6 years? Serious question - as I wonder if there are secret herbs and spices to seal it as opposed to hide the problem for long enough for decent life in use of that specific application. I shy away from MDF ever since I read here about the problems. I must admit to not having been sufficiently educated on the dust problems of MDF and the hit the tools take. Haven't used it since.
I guess my brain tells me MDF is not the product for wet areas, just as chip board isn't (even though it is used a LOT in Aus for just that...)
So budget may lead to MDF/Chipboard, but QUALITY leads to other alternatives. Almost makes me think of another wise phrase ex the Wreck..."Buy once, cry once".
2c
Mike Brisbane Aus.
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The highway department uses a paper faced mdf for road signs. I think it is the paint that is the key element here.
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Leon wrote:
> The highway department uses a paper faced mdf for road signs. I think it is > the paint that is the key element here.
Think you are referring to MDO which is actually plywood with paper face(s) depending on application.
Not aware of a product consisting of MDF core with paper face(s).
Lew
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<snip> | So is this 'so called' waterproof adhesive suitable as a sealant on this mdf | please. Or is PVA waterproof adhesive essentially different from PVA | sealant and so not suitable to seal the mdf. thanks
Once I used some water-proof glue on a veneer and got a stain that wouldn't go a way.. maybe I'm the only one in this world that this has ever happened to....
woodstuff
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Several previous posts have refered to sign makers. Highway departments responsible for signage which must withstand exterior and moist conditions use a material called MDO (medium density overlay). It has a smooth paper surface suitable for painting. I suspect the factory treats the sheets to withstand the elements. For your application, I also would not recommend MDF. Joe G
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