Ping Bill, in Indiana; Anyone near Waverly, Ohio?

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On 6/19/2011 12:39 AM, Bill wrote:

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-100018182/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053
Maybe, I have had that kind under my scrap lumber bin, the rubber wheels broke.
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wrote:

I've had these http://goo.gl/EySsk for years without problems, but usually on lighter-weight stuff, under #100 load on each wheel.
-- Happiness is not a station you arrive at, but a manner of traveling. -- Margaret Lee Runbeck
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On 6/19/2011 10:11 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

I had less than 50lbs on each wheel. Axle pushed right through the wheel center and broke it.
I find the harder plastic wheels hold up much better.
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Having worked in a hospital setting, I became aware of rolling equipment eventually becoming damaged. One day, I checked with the maintenace department to see if there were any casters available for salvaging, to put on a lathe cabinet I made. Sho-nuff, half a dozen sets of top quality casters.... soft & hard rubber tired, plastic tires, bare metal. If convenient, call your local hospital maintenace department to see what might be available. Besdies the lathe cabinet, I've used some of those salvaged casters for 2 carts I made for moving upholstered furniture, steel ones for my anvil base and 2 for the RAS.
In the salvage mix was 2 patient gurneys. The aluminum framing was perfect for refabbing into furniture carts, w/ soft roll wheels (no damage rolling on customer's hardwood floors) that turn on a dime. Those gurneys/casters are required to support very large patients!
Sonny
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Yeah, those are hard rubber and should be OK.

I remember learning that lesson. BPs are great for wood, aren't they? No splintering at the leading edges now, even in softwood! Forstners are another treat.
-- Happiness is not a station you arrive at, but a manner of traveling. -- Margaret Lee Runbeck
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Since we're talking about this. I noticed all of my exit holes came out without splintering, but I had some splintering where where the (1/2") bit entered. I was using a variable-speed hand drill. I was wondering whether to blame this on the drill not being up-to-speed before contact? Is this the likely culprit?
BTW, same bit on my new DP, speed set to 1500 RPM as per DP guidelines. No splintering.
Bill
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Bill wrote:

Hmmm.. another variable. In the case where I got splintering I had already pre-drilled with 3/16" bit. Is that, more likely, the source of the splintering.
Bill
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Brad point bit or metal cutting bit?
.... 3) Dull/nicked drill bit, 4) soft or weak wood, 5) ...., 6) .....
Sonny
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Sonny wrote:

I was using 1/2" Brad point bit. I'm thinking that it was the 3/16" pre-drilling,or my starting at slow speed. The bits came out cleaner than they went in. Those 4 holes were for my 1/2" bolts for the metal DP base. Naturally they didn't quite line up well enough with the 1/2" holes in the base so I ended up re-drilling them with a 5/8" bit. One important lesson in the project was "don't make yer tolerances too tight, or you'll spend a lot of time working around them!"! ;)
Bill
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Slow RPM usually _isn't_ a problem when drilling wood.

With a brad point, yes, likely the culprit. The guide tit (we'll call him Brad for good measure) didn't have anything to grab onto, so when the first flute hit (if it weren't exactly vertical) it tried to drill an oblong or oversized hole. Try to avoid pilot holes in wood unless you're using a twist drill in the center of a hole saw and the pilot is the same or smaller size than the pilot bit in the saw.
-- The more passions and desires one has, the more ways one has of being happy. -- Charlotte-Catherine
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Thanks, that makes sense.

Okay... My technique hasn't caught up with the technology (never used BP bits before...). I like the BP bits just fine now though. It's great to be able to bore holes right where you want two!
Bill

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On Fri, 17 Jun 2011 23:16:41 -0700, Morgans wrote:

I worked in a furniture plant back in an earlier life, most of the table saws were set up to do a particular job and even though they may have sawn more lumber in a day than a cabinet shop or home user would put through it in a lifetime, the trunnions and gear drives on the adjustments would be like new even after many years of hard use.
basilisk
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basilisk wrote:

I surprised but pleased to learn that the wear from hard use is likely to be so minimal. Are arbor bearings likely to be in good shape too (I have no idea what's involved in replacing them)? I'm pretty sure that I won't do as much sawing in my lifetime as a factory saw could do in a long day.
Bill
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