Piece marking advice wanted

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I've been using the removable masking tape (blue) for labeling pieces as I cut them, but have seen that sometimes, especially on plywood, the tape will pull some of the wood fibers from under the tape when I remove it after a day or so. I quit using pencil because it can take a lot of sanding or scraping to remove the marks.
Is there another tape I can use which will not leave adhesive or pull fibers from the wood, or do I need to use pencil or some other write-on marking system (e.g., chalk)?
--
John Snow
"If I knew what I was doing, I wouldn't be here"
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Try using the small sticky notes.
Bob S.

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Do they make Post-it tape? Post-its themselves don't have enough adhesive area to prevent them from being accidentally dislodged. I could rip the non-adhesive portions from the notes, but it would be easier to use tape.
--
John Snow
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John,
Been awhile since I looked but there is a 3m "Super-Sticky" PostIt note http://www.3m.com/us/office/postit/supersticky/index.jhtml
There may be some other low-adhesion tapes that won't pull up any grain but I've been using the 3M blue tape for several years now and haven't any problems.
Bob S.

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Yes. I have a roll around somewhere.
scott
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Try the green masking tape used by painters & decorators. It's designed to be easily removed. Mark info on the tape before removing and sticking on the wood. You can use any sort of pen then.
Bill.

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"Hitch" wrote ...

Chalk is what I use. White chalk on dark wood and some other colored chalk on light wood. My daughter has sidewalk chalk in kind of a brown color. I either use that or blue for the light wood. I have NEVER had any problem with it dying or staining the wood (plywood or otherwise), or otherwise interfering with the finish.
--
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Howard
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On Mon, 28 Jun 2004 15:48:23 -0400, "Howard Ruttan"

as a long time user of chalk for this purpose I have adjusted my thinking recently. I had chalk marks telegraph through the finish on some birch ply cabinets- there was no stain, the finish was waterborne poly sprayed on, and though the chalk wasn't visible on the surface before spraying, the numbers showed up in the finish coat.
I still mark with chalk, but only on rough cuts on material that will be further dimensioned. after that I mark with pencil on a hidden surface or use tape.
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They sometimes bind that chalk with wax, you know. That could ruin your day.

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Paint thinner will remove pencil marks.
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Besides the obvious, that there's an end, edge, or inside that will accept marking without having to worry about removal.
I keep the pieces in stacks, labeled.

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I thought about marking the edges, except that I keep cutting off the edges as I proceed.
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John Snow
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Can't figure how I manage my workflow to make it possible, but I'm going to keep planning ahead and marking accordingly.

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The good advice: post-it notes (or post-it tape), pencil marks in hidden or to-be-trimmed-off places, stacking like parts together and labelling the stack.
The not-so-good advice: chalk. On close-grained woods such as maple or cherry, chalk is just fine. But it should *not* be used on open-grained woods. I have very un-fond memories of a morning spent with a bright light and a magnifying glass, using a dental examiner to pick bits of chalk out of the pores on three pieces of beautiful quartersawn red oak before I could finish it. Now, I use chalk only for marking rough lumber.
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gee Doug..... I think we went to the same school... Picyune Chalk Outtaboard High....
Bob S.

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John, An old drag racing tip will work here as well. When product sponsors offering contingency awards for winners they would require us to have a product sticker on the car. (We were NOT required to use the product, only the sticker!)
We did not want most of these super sticky logos on the car permently so we would stick it to our shirt or pants first. This would lift the cotton fibers and provide for easy removal after the award ceremony and contingency awards were handed out.
Stick the tape to you pant leg before applying it to the wood, use a Sharpie to make notes. Works great.
Dave

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I use crayon, usually on the back, edge, or end that won't show. Even on faces of boards, if you use only enough pressure to write, the crayon sands off easily. You can even use colors for additional meanings.
I also keep crayons on the jointer to mark the 90 degree edges.
Barry
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Chalk works very well for me.
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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I have seen David Marks use it. Do you have trouble getting it out of the open grain of Oak or Walnut?

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"Leon" wrote ...

Just don't pound it in with a sledge hammer like Doug does. You can always reapply it. If an errant particle does get caught you should be able to remove it with compressed air. I've never had that trouble before - not even on red oak or walnut.
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