Oval picture frame

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I once had a student breathlessly tell me how his Dad used a sliderule for so many math calculations, including addition and subtraction. I just smiled and walked away.
--
Nonny
Suppose you were an idiot.
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On 3/30/2010 6:53 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Do you remember your first electronic calculator? I got a TI-30 (IIRC) when I went back to school briefly after the service. We weren't even allowed to bring them to class, much less take a test with it.
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"Swingman" wrote:

1970-71 vintage.
Mine was a desk top, plug in, Commodore with 4 functions (Add, subtract, multiply, divide)
Special sale for $119 + tax.
Such a deal................
A few weeks later it was $99.
Lew
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On 3/30/2010 8:37 PM, Swingman wrote:

talking about was bought in 1970. It had a big nixy(sp?) display and was the size of a typewriter. It was significantly better that the old mechanical one. It did X / + - and had 12 rows of 10 keys in each row. Took several seconds to do simply + and - calculations and longer to do X and /.
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Monroe 990 with 16 digit display. The Frieden was better, with its initial 3-level version of RPN, but who woulda' thunk it?
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Nonny
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"Nonny" wrote: The electronic

--------------------------------------------- My first job out of school was in the engineering dept which included the estimating group.
Everybody in the estimating group had a comptometer on his desk.
If they had been Orientals, maybe they would have been an abacus instead.
Lew
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On 3/30/2010 9:22 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Early to mid 70's .. but I may be wrong about the model #. I do recall that is was designated as a "student calculator".
Don't hold me to the exact particulars.
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In 1970 I bought with a loan app - a $600 calculator from a business supply company. It was a 12 digit Nixie tube four-banger with memory. It saved the beloved and I when doing grades. A few more years later I had a machine language computer.
I did logs on that 4 banger - trig sin and cos and tan. There were some very creative guys learning tricks and approximations and small formulas that one could get good numbers.
The company was Cannon. I scrapped out the machine in about 1995 or so. It had a bad supply - HV likely leaky and the controller wasn't up to speed.
Several years after the first TI and HP came on the scene - and we both died. $150 for a full blown ? - I think we still owned about that much on the Nixie box. TI's SR-50 ... Been a TI and HP guy since. Went to HP in 85 and back to TI in 2008.
I had a small circular slide rule, Dad had a tubular slide rule. We both still have slide rules in our desks and use them. Faster than getting out the banger and entering the number.
Long calc's or complex ones bring out the box - one or the other.
Martin
Keith Nuttle wrote:

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On 3/31/2010 9:48 PM, Martin H. Eastburn wrote:

Just a comment but I picked up a piece of software a while back called "The Mathematical Explorer" for about a hundred bucks. Turned out to be the Mathematica 6 core with a couple of features turned off and without some of the add-on packages. They've discontinued that now and have a full-featured version sold for non-commercial use for 400 bucks or so. If you happen to find the older one though for the low price it's well worth getting if you ever have to do any kind of serious computation.

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On 3/30/2010 9:22 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Nope ... mid 70's.
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HP gave me a 35 for my work on the 80. That was a long time ago.
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Nonny
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On 3/30/2010 10:33 PM, Nonny wrote:

My first was an HP45--marvelous when it worked. Four hundred bucks and it wasn't reliable. Seems downright primitive today.

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On 3/30/2010 7:37 PM, Swingman wrote:

I held off buying a pocket calculator until I could get one that was both programmable and affordable.
I ended up buying an HP-25. I still have it stored away somewhere, and the last time I powered it up, it still ran.
I used that until 1980 when I got a Radio Shack TRS-80 Pocket Computer that could run (sorta) BASIC programs, read/write to a cassette drive, and print on a cash register size tape. It's here on my desk needing new batteries (and a new ribbon for the printer).
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Morris Dovey
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Keith Nuttle wrote:

Gosh, I need to go back--I think I forgot to do something! : )
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"Keith Nuttle" wrote:

Brings to mind Oberlin College, a liberal arts school located in Oberlin, Oh, about 40 miles SW of Cleveland.
Am convinced the curriculum is designed to teach you how to survive grad school an obtain a PhD.
Must be working since more than a few Chairman of the Board, CEO types, have graduated from Oberlin.
Lew
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On 3/30/2010 4:13 PM, Morris Dovey wrote:

I learned that I do best to just get a good text and work through it.
There used to be a schaum's outline on analytic geometry--been out of print for 20 years though.
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You would probably go with an elipse cutting jig\tramel something like this (there are lots of them out there) http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/A_Jig_for_Drawing_or_Cutting_Ellipses.html
The basic steps one would typically follow is... - Cut a template from MDF or other easy to cut material using the jig - Use the template to draw the shape on your blank stock - Cut the blank stock close to finish size with band\jig\scroll\ect. saw - Use the template to finish rout the real part using a bearing \pattern bit.
For an oval you might want to be creative on the glue up of some stock using sticks to get a rough shape, maybe using half lap joints.
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"SonomaProducts.com" wrote:
For an oval you might want to be creative on the glue up of some stock using sticks to get a rough shape, maybe using half lap joints. ---------------------------------------- Think I'd want to use scarf joints, at least 8:1, rather than half laps.
And as Morris stated, this job begs for a spindle sander.
Have fun.
Lew
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I think of lap and scarf as the same thing. I was thinking a lap\scarf similar to the first on on this page http://www.sawdustmaking.com/woodjoints/scarf.htm but bevel cut the ends to accomodate the oval. say if you want a 2" wide finish you use 4" wide sticks roughed to the shape.
Which type of scarf would you suggest?
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"SonomaProducts.com" wrote:

Fig 211 in your reference is what I know as a half lap joint.
I know a scarf joint is some form of a tapered joint such as fig 213.
Not sure whether I'd want to have the scarf joint horizontal (fig 213) or vertical as would typically found be found on a boat cap rail.
Probably vertical since it would simplify forming the curved sections same as a boat cap rail.
Lew
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