OT On/Topic... removing rust the easy way.

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On Wed, 1 Jun 2016 16:09:22 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Sorry, I meant if the rust is through the porcelain/enamelware. You would know because there would definitely be an edge where you can catch your fingernail on it, or your skin would feel the edge.
Had a pan that did that, and OUCH, I felt it in my mouth a piece or two, very tiny. In my case I tossed the pan lest anyone at home would use it.
So if you use it, keep a watchful eye for future deterioration.
And Clare was right on the money.
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On Thursday, June 2, 2016 at 2:44:41 PM UTC-4, OFWW wrote:

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exposing

at I might as well just toss the pot? The thought of making coffee in a rus ty pot takes

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No "lip', just a few rough, rust colored spots right where the steel basket sits.
I found some some food-safe enamel paint, but it's temperature range only goes to 200°.
http://www.piwine.com/gondola-enamel-black-500cc.html
Specs emailed from their customer service department:
-20° F if surface is not flexible and up to 200° F.
Even though the ideal water temp for coffee is between 195° and 200? ?, that is very hard to control in a percolator. Theoretically, only the water under the basket base should reach the boiling point but of course, that's right where the paint would be. (not to mention the flame under the pot) Food safe or not, I don't want melted paint in my coffee.
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snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net says...

You might want to google "torch enameling". The existing coating is melted-on glass and apparently you can melt on more glass with a propane torch. Whether it will bond to the metal and the existing glass I have no idea but the stuff to do it is cheap and if there's no local supplier you can get it on Amazon. I'd make sure I got all the rust off down to bare metal first.
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On Tue, 31 May 2016 11:07:06 -0400

main ingredient is water in vinegar
water removes rust well too once oils and grease are removed
maybe the acids in vinegar increases the reaction time or it may make the water penetrate better
might be improved ion exchange over just plain water
hmmmm
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On Tue, 31 May 2016 09:52:21 -0700, Electric Comet

Vinegar is also a chemical used is photo developing. But probably not as much today.
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Acetic acid has a number of uses, including as precursor to PVA (which is why PVA glues have a vinegar odor) and a component in Acetylsalicyclic acid (ASA), AKA Aspirin.
Vinegar is very dilute Acetic acid.
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Scott Lurndal wrote:

Plus other stuff depending upon from what it was made.
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Markem wrote:

I was a photographer for 50 years. Neither I nor anyone I ever met or heard of used vinegar in photography. Acetic acid, yes; vinegar, no. The acid is often used to stop the action of the developer which is basic.
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wrote:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acetic_acid
3 to 9 percent of vinegar is acetic acid, more diluted than a stop bath but the same acid.
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Markem wrote:

Plus the other stuff.

Glacial acetic acid is generally 28% acid. I never measured but probably used about 1 ounce per 32 ounces of water which would be around 1% or less.
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wrote:

Another add
http://photo.net/black-and-white-photo-printing-finishing-forum/0056sf
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On Tuesday, May 31, 2016 at 4:47:41 PM UTC-5, dadiOH wrote:

ard

is

He probably meant "vinegar" in a generic sense, rather than household vineg ar, per se.
Most medical "film" processing is all digital, today..... X-rays, CTs, MRI s, etc. .... Probably similarly with regular photography. Digital makes images more clear and sharp, as opposed to old style X-ray, etal, imaging a nd processing. Zeroing in on the mass of a patient or area to be imaged, via computerized "measuring", is much more efficient and exacting, than a t ech's manual measuring & positioning, etc. Digital facilitates a real help ful advantage, since one can send images across the world in an instant, vs hand carrying sheets of negatives from office to office.
Soon after we retired, our "old style" (sheet film) liquid Developer & Fixe r (vinegar) X-ray processing became obsolete. I'm not sure if film compan ies even make available the hardcopy film, for those obsolete processors/pr ocessing, anymore.
Sonny
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Electric Comet wrote:

Or maybe - JUST MAYBE - it (the acid in the vinegar) is reducing the ferric iron oxide to ferrous iron oxide. Yeah, I choose that one, acids do that..
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On 5/31/2016 11:07 AM, woodchucker wrote:

I'm going to add that the slotted screws that I could not break loose even after spraying with blaster, came loose with a long soak in the vinegar.
So that's really great also..
So go fix an old tool and enjoy it.
--
Jeff

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On Wed, 1 Jun 2016 21:04:39 -0400

found this to be true with just water too
but now since reading this i will try vinegar next time
vinegar also works well on plumbing fixtures with hardwater deposits
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