OT: need snake advice

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Yes it's OT, but you all seem to have such a broad base of knowledge here, thought you wouldn't mind helping a fellow woodworker out.
(Central Fl area)
Walked out on our pool/screened patio area this morning with my Golden Retriever and found a little baby snake had gotten into the area, and was trying to get back out. I see black snakes and garter (sic?) snakes quite often around the house. I don't have any fear of snakes, and just pick them up and take them out behind our house to a retention pond area and set them loose. But this one looked different and started shaking his tail (amazing how fast it was going) when I approached. I used a broom to direct him out the screen door into the back yard, paying close attention to his coloring, head, tail etc.
A quick search on the internet turned up his twin brother: http://www.attention-to-details.com/newslog/46u-baby-rattlesnake-rescue.asp
I'd heard about rattlesnakes in FL before, but in almost 30 years living here, I'd never seen one. Of course what comes to mind, is if there is a baby then there must be a mother too. I have no desire to hunt down and kill the snakes, but I can't let my dog, wife, son, ME! out there doing yard work and, well, you know what I mean.
Any advice ?
JimInFl
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"Jim Bailey" wrote

Call animal control.
After you call A/C, give them their space.
They mean you no harm unless provoked.
We have are share of R/S here in SoCal, usually responsible for killing a couple of pet dogs during the season.
Good luck.
Lew
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Gottem here in Wisc. too. Best bet is to give them room and find out what they like to hide in and get rid of it. They love my cord wood pile.

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"Jim Bailey" wrote

Then "Lew Hodgett" wrote...

That's ridiculous and the reason our taxes are so high. DON'T look for help from the govt. and get the rake out. Sheesh!
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"Scott Cox" wrote

You pay for professional services, that's why they exist.
If you screw up and end up in the E/R, then what have you saved?
Here in SoCal, we coexist with a number of wild animals including brown bears, mountain lions, coyotes as well as rattlesnakes.
They were here first, it is basically our problem to get along.
There is a type of rattlesnake here in SoCal that is confined to only one area which has an unusual venom which does not respond to the usual serums.
The hospital in that area is the only one that has the necessary serum to treat the bite.
Go to the wrong hospital and you die before they can get the correct serum.
Animal control and the medics are aware of the local requirements, and train to respond to these situations on a regular basis.
The cost of actually going out on a call gets lost in the wash.
Of course, you want to be a cowboy, that's your business.
Lew
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"Lew Hodgett" wrote.....
.....

It was a baby snake. If you relate that to a trip to the ER then it's time to face some fears. .......

That's how we do things here in Texas. You must be one of those "metro men" I've heard about. Maybe you should get outdoors more? :-)
Scott (who doesn't need govt. agency to kill baby snake for me)
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"Scott Cox" wrote:

Make that mistake her in SoCal and you can be in deep trouble.
It is the baby of the family that is the biggest problem with the snake that is confined to one area.

After spending some time in San Angelo, learned a healthy respect for cowboy boots, turns out they actually have a purpose.
Goodyear had built some oval test tracks and left the infeld untouched.
As a diversion, the drivers would run over the rattlesnakes that came out of the infield, then stop and cut off the rattle.
When they got back to the start house, there was a 4x8 sheet of plywood, a box of 16d nails and a hammer which was used to nail up the trophy rattles.
They were working on the 3rd-4th board when I was there.
There was a time in my life when snake hunting was an interesting way to spend an afternoon with friends.
When you are 16, you we surprised how good you get snap shooting from the hip with a .22 when you're after snakes, but that was then and this is now.
These days, probably couoldn't hit a bull in the ass with a barn door, much less a .22.
Bottom line...................................
Time marches on and don't let the size of the snake fool you.
Lew
.
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it takes a lot of physical resources of the snake to generate the venom. a large snake knows this and will bite but won't inject (it knows it can't eat something so large). a baby snake doesn't know this, and injects on almost every bite.

regards, charlie cave creek, az
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Sun, Aug 19, 2007, 2:13pm (EDT-2) snipped-for-privacy@nohow.com (ScottCox) doth sayeth: That's ridiculous and the reason our taxes are so high. DON'T look for help from the govt. and get the rake out. Sheesh!
Rake is unhandy for killing snakes, hoe, or spade, is much handier. I like a revolver and shot cartridges. Then a shovel to pick them up - sometimes they have muscle reacon..
JOAT I do things I don't know how to do, so that I might learn how to do them. - Picasso
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

"the only good snake is a dead snake" We have plenty in Oz, and any that find their way into my yard end up coming to grief with the harp end of a spade.
John
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On Mon, 20 Aug 2007 08:37:29 +0800, John B wrote:

Yeah, but most of yours are poisonous. Most of the snakes in the US are harmless. Only 4 are poisonous. They are:
A. Copperhead (SE U.S.): So lazy they sometimes won't strike even if you pick them up - although that's not a good idea. Their poison won't even kill a large dog, although a small child might sucumb if not treated.
B. Water moccasin aka cottonmouth (also SSE U.S.): This one is pretty poisonous, but you'll only get bit if you swim with one. There is a "fake" cottonmouth that mimics the poisonous one and is much more common. No poison, but you'll probably get a reaction from its filthy mouth.
C. Rattlesnake (various subspecies all over the U.S.): Most of these can kill an adult if not treated, but there have been cases where the victim just stayed calm and survived. They normally rattle to warn you off before striking, but if you step on one that's not much help.
D. Coral Snake (mostly Florida, but occasionally found further north): This is the only U.S. snake with neurotoxic venom. Very deadly. But the poison glands are in the rear of the mouth, so some people who report bites have survived because they only got bitten with the front teeth. They are sometimes confused with the harmless king snake, which is a very good ratter and mouser, Old saying: "red on yellow, friendly fellow - red on black, look out Jack!"
BTW, we also have a snake known as the hog-nose viper. It will attack and even strike, but always does so with its mouth closed. If that doesn't scare you off, it rolls over on its back and plays dead. Only problem is that if you flip it onto its belly, it'll flip right back over again :-).
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Here's a story of one 13-year-old's experience with a rattlesnake bite that went untreated for nearly five hours while he was being transported to a hospital.
Don't click on the link to the pictures if you have a weak stomach.
http://www.rattlesnakebite.org/index.htm

--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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I have to disagree with you here, they are shy not lazy. That makes them even more dangerous. I have dealt with copperheads, cottonmouths and rattlesnakes and of the 3 the copperhead is the one I worried the most about and is most likely to be a 'biter'. That's because of their shyness; they will not run but lay still and hope don't see them and leave. Because they don't move a lot of the times you don't know they are there until you have gotten so close they bite you in self defense.
Most of the time the other two will either run or try to scare you off. The cottonmouth by flashing his white mouth, the rattlesnake by rattling.

Or they drop into the boat with you. Fishing in the South can be very exciting because cottonmouths, and other snakes, like to climb into low hanging tree limbs to bash in the sun. When scared their instinct is to quickly drop into the water. FYI, a boat moving along quietly with an electric trolling motor usually doesn't scare them until it is VERY close to them,. Can you right under them? I thought you could. :)
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"no spam" responds to

with:
Only snake that I've ever been "chased" by, in the sense that they would come toward you instead of retreating, is a copperhead.
We had them by the dozens when I was growing up and mowing a big yard during certain times of the year was guaranteed to scare up two or three. They almost always came toward me instead of retreating, something I've experienced enough times to safely say it was a characteristic behavior, at least for the "Southern" variety we had in south Louisiana.
Politically correct or not, a live copperhead is not a welcome critter on a farm with small animals and lots of children, so add a lawnmower to the list of anything-that'll-get-the-job-done-on-the-spot snake killing tools.
--
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As in the human world not all snakes act the way they are supposed to.

Might have something to do with the mower. Of all the copperheads I've dealt with would just lay as still as possible until you were within striking distance. Makes then the hardest to find but the easiest to catch.

No venomous snake remains near the house or barn but neither are they killed just because. They are caught and relocated. Lots of room around here for everyone.
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On Mon, 20 Aug 2007 19:05:25 +0000, no spam wrote:

I can only go from experience. Some of us found one on the playground in 6th grade and handed it around to each other, not knowing it was venomous. We finally put it in a glass jar and took it back to class. The teacher had a fit! Told us to go out and kill it. We took it back to the corner of the playground and turned it loose :-).
In Virginia, a neighbor's dog (Labrador) got bitten several times when he attacked a group of copperheads sunning themselves. His son also got bit when he rushed in to "save" the dog. Both got promptly treated and were back out playing in a couple of days - hopefully a little wiser :-).
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RE: Subject
Guess there is at least one advantage to living in a place where you have snow and cold weather for at least a couple of months each year.
In all the years I lived in Northern Ohio, never saw a poisonous snake of any kind.
My dad told me there might be some copperheads around, but not cotton mouths, it simply got to cold in the winter.
Lew
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Larry Blanchard wrote:

Dragged a couple of old memories out of the dusty depths. When I was a youngster in about grade 6 or 7 at primary school, we owned a dairy farm. During hay cutting and bailing season it was not uncommon (read very common)to knock the head of a snake while cutting or have a couple bailed in the hay. These where Dugites, very deadly and have been known to grow to about the 6' mark. Anyhow, Dad clipped one with the hay cutter, reckon it was about 10' long (well seemed it to young bloke) probably around the 3-4' mark. He suggested that I take it school to show the other kids,mostly townies) and the teacher. Monday morning came and I dutifully caught the bus for the 10 mile ride into school with my prize, in a sugar bag.
While showing my school mates, somehow "Show the Teacher" became "lets put it in her desk drawer" The snake was carefully coiled in the top drawer with a piece of paper covering the end where the head should have been.
Well needless to say, the teacher (First time in the bush from the city) opened the drawer and all hell broke loose.
My mate and I got six of the best on the arse from the head master along with having to write out a thousand lines at home. Can't remember what they were now.
When I got home the old man gave me clip under the ear as well,between fits of laughter, though I think that was more for getting caught than doing what we did.
All the best John
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Larry Blanchard wrote: ...

Better relearn your ditty -- you're backwards.
"Red and yellow, kill a fellow..." is more useful to remember.
--
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I prefer
"Red on yellow, kill the bastard, red on black, kill the bastard"

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