OT: CFL Bulbs

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So would moving. ;-)
I pay $.07 and have electric heat (heat pump). Incandescents still work well. ;-)
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You haven't bought 2ft fluorescent tubes lately, have you <snicker>
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Philips-24-in-T12-20-Watt-Soft-White-3000K-Linear-Fluorescent-Light-Bulb-391201/100115828 http://www.lowes.com/pd_149111-371-64237___?productId379966
The 2ft are getting MORE expensive and the quality has fallen DRASTICALLY: I only get about 9 months of continuous use with either GE or Philips. Back in the '90s I was getting 2 yrs.

Only time will tell...

If the LED tube lasts 2 years I break even. If it lasts 5.7 yrs I'm ahead more than $20 and that's without considering the electricity savings.
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[...]

... coincident with the shift of manufacturing from the U.S. to China.

My experience matches yours.
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On 1/1/2016 5:41 PM, Spalted Walt wrote:

If there is one or two fixtures to convert, buying new connectors isn't costly, but if there is a room or more full and one doesn't want to add the cost of non-shunted connectors, they can remove the rear cover and snip off the connecting bridge. Time consuming? Perhaps, but could be worth saving a for a tank of gas.
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Depends on the lamps. I replaced a lot of 60 and 100 watt incandescents with LEDs - (E26/E27 base) and have not had a single failure yet (over a year).
I also replaced a string of 7 (120 volt) halogen mini-spots with LEDs. They are out in the open - not in cans - and I've put at leadt 4 or 5 complete sets through in the last 3 yezrs or so. I put about 150? 12 volt mini-spots in at the insurance office 3 years ago. I bought 400 of them, and I'm out of spares. Some of the originals are still doing fine, and some have been replaced 5 or 6 times. The voltage is right, at about 12.2 volts. and the cans are not insulated.
The incandescents in my house - very many of them, anyway, were still the ones that were in the house when we bought it 33 years ago when we replaced them with CFLs. 6 or so years ago, and I replaced CFLs time and again untill I got the LEDs over the last 2 years. My luck with the (earlier) CFLs was as bad as with the GU10 and MR16 LEDs.
The standard ED bulbs and led PARs have been fantastic.
I'm looking at the 40 inch Flourescent replacement leds to replace the 4 remaining 40 inch tubes in the house - the "direct replacement" ones that do not require modification of the fixtures.
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On 12/30/2015 1:21 PM, Casper wrote:

So there is little difference between cfl and led. Both have a short life. The led's transformer goes b4 the bulb.
The problem is that the heat goes right to the transformers, put the bulb into a socket where the socket is below the bulb, and the heat disipates.
These bulbs are not really that good for the price. They may save energy short term, but I'll bet the cost in energy to produce them probably out weighs any benefit.
My garage door opener won't take a cfl, it's too short a base on the cfl.
Notice that all the bulbs are really about 60watt equivs for led. I always used 75 or 100.
It doesn't matter the company, I've had 3 different units burn out like that.
--
Jeff

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Not a terrible price but 100-watt is too bright for my house. Most of the daily use fixtures we have are 2 or 3 bulb so 100-watt would give me a severe headache.
The light in our kitchen that burnt out gets used approximately 5 hours per day. Was hoping this one would last longer but so far the all ones we have all died in about a third of the stated lifespan. Guess it is what you get for free.
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Looks like a capacitor in the ballast electronics failed.

According to the box in your picture, the stated lifespan is 12000 hours. That's 3 hours per day over 11 years. I'm going to guess that, in the kitchen you probably had the light on more than 3 hours per day.
LEDs are definately the way to go, tho, now that the prices are getting reasonable. I've never liked the twisties, and thanks to having stockpiled a several year supply of incandescents a while back, I'll be able to go right to LEDs, and skip the CFL stage.
John
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On 12/30/2015 4:22 PM, John McCoy wrote:

With 11' ceilings I tossed my supply of Par40 incandescent bulbs which I got for free, 20 or so. Our kitchen had 5 of these canned lights and one was burning out every 4~6 weeks for the last year. I switched to the LED's equal to 70 watt for about $60 for 6 lamps and 8 weeks later no climbing on a ladder.
I think pay off will be with in 3 years considering that I went from 325 watts to 70 watts.
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wrote:

And add your labor costs for changing out the bulbs, (time is money) and I'd bet you that your lamps have already paid for themselves.
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On Wed, 30 Dec 2015 17:00:41 -0800, OFWW wrote:

Casper, we owe you a big thank you. Went and checked some bulbs we'd gotten from our utility (a long way from Duke) and they were the same ones! They now reside in the dead bulb bag :-).
I hope others are checking as well.
--
Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!

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This was the second bulb I caught. First bulb didn't glow orange but it did have a tiny melted brown spot about 2mm around the base of one stem. I was glad we stopped what we were doing to look in the kitchen and check the light as otherwise who knows what could have happened. I'm glad if any info I provde helps anyone. :)
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LEDs have a side benefit (or an outside benefit). They attract fewer bugs. We had two lights, about 20' apart. One light had incandescent bulbs while the other had LED bulbs. There was a distinct difference in the number of bugs around the lights, with the LED fixture having significantly less.
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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wrote:

The only CFL bulbs I trust to give somewhere near their "estimated" life are FEIT. I've had numerous other brands go "Phfft!" in one unpleasant manner or another. Now I'm buying LED bulbs to replace the incandescents and CFL's as they die. The "home centers" occasionally have brand name (GE, Sylvania) LED bulbs for about $3 each - sometimes even the dimmable versions. Three-way LED bulbs are still pricey but cheaper and more reliable than the CFL's I've tried.
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On 30/12/2015 11:21 AM, Casper wrote:

I have electronic timers in several rooms in the house that will not work with CFLs due to the initial draw when they come on. Unfortunately, there is also a minimum 40W draw to make the timers work so I can't use LEDs without mixing them with conventional bulbs in a multi light circuit. Graham
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