OT: Burgers!

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"Max" wrote:

As I understand it, they have less than 5,000 outlets.
Compared to Mickey D's, Burger King And Wendy's, they don't even qualify as small, there are in the midget class.<G>
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

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Hard to beat In-n-Out, but a little mom/pop joint where I used to live did it. No great crowds, no far n' wide fame. Just a simple burger grilled in typical fashion, Wonder buns, tomato, lettuce, onion, and off the shelf condiments. I don't know the trick and can't explain it, but I'd pay the $3.50 price over a Double-Double every time.
nb
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Yes, I read that survey. When comparing to the other fast food outfits, I happen to like Wendy's burgers the best. That might partially be caused by the fact that in my daily travels, Wendy's is usually way down the list when I'm hungry and passing by a fast food outlet.
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"Upscale" wrote:

Royal Castle had a better taste, but alas they are gone.
Still remember, for $0.50 you could get 3 hamburgers @ $0.15 each and a glass of Birch (Root) beer for $0.05.
Sometimes a group of hungry students would walk the 6 blocks down Euclid Ave from the dorm to Royal Castle and pig out. When you are 18, you can get away with that stuff.
Had a fraternity brother who worked as a grill man at Royal Castle for a while, had to quit.
The smell of that smoky greasy beef tallow coming up off the grill made him sick.
Lew
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I remember that name, although I can't quite remember if I've ever eaten in one.

That price is a little before my time, at least when I'd be paying for myself.
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At one point, I was a frequent traveler to Aix en Provence in the south of France. There was a little place that served the best Steak Tartare. Yumm.
-- Doug
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"Robatoy" wrote:

I usually grind brisket for burgers. Medium rare, salt, pepper, catsup. Sometimes extra sharp cheddar cheese.
Burgers should be formed by hand and not too tight and not overworked. Grill should be very hot. Get a good sear, flip, finish cooking to desired doneness.
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Robatoy wrote:

That said, I start with meat. Seared, pink inside. Onion. Ketchup. Oh and a bun. If I'm feeling especially frisky, extra salt and a ladle of 100 proof cholesterol. Yum. Washed down with a diet something or other. Strictly gourmet, that's me.     burp,     jo4hn
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"Robatoy" wrote

cheese.
I also like the big, cucumber chips from trader joes. And some big, cheese or garlic or sourdough bagels for the bun.
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both insides of the bun. Ketchup, side of potato salad. Mmmmmmmmmmm....
Oh - and glass of cold milk!
Matt
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milk too. Or a stiff tequila drink. And that remind sme, I love potato salad. And the missus made some up today. Gotta run. Steak and potato salad for this hungry boy tonight!!
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"Lee Michaels" wrote:

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This one is courtesy of Emeril, both are DYN-O-MITE.
\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ FLO'S ROASTED POTATO SALAD
NOTE: This version uses parsley. Alternate version uses cilantro.
2 pounds new potatoes 10 cloves of fresh garlic Drizzle of olive oil Salt Freshly ground black pepper 3/4 cup homemade mayonnaise, or store bought 2 tablespoons Creole Mustard Juice of one fresh lemon 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley leaves 4 hard-boiled eggs, sliced 1/2 pound bacon, rendered until crispy 1/2 small red onions, thinly sliced
Preheat the oven to 400F.
In a mixing bowl, toss the potatoes and garlic with a drizzle of olive oil.
Toss well.
Season with salt and pepper.
Place on a baking sheet and roast for 15 minutes.
Remove from the oven and cool completely.
Using a mini food processor, combine mayonnaise, mustard and lemon juice.
Process until smooth. Season with salt and pepper.
Add the parsley and continue to process until incorporated.
In a mixing bowl, toss the roasted potatoes and garlic, mayonnaise, sliced eggs, bacon and red onions. Mix well.
Season with salt and pepper.
Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 2 hours.
Remove from the refrigerator and mix the salad.
Reseason with salt and pepper if needed.
Yield: 4 to 6 servings
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wrote:

I use a cast-iron brick, with holes in the removable lid and I fill it with wood chips. It sits on the 'flavourizer' bars of my Weber. Ang and I broke down 10 years ago and dropped (what we thought was a lot) some serious coin on a BBQ. A Weber Silver B. Looking back, that was a very good decision. That thing has only cost me a $ 13.00 igniter. It lives outside and gets used year-round. People all around me have replaced their BBQ at least twice since then. Some have those massive all-stainless-looking monstrosities with the big fat knobs and a dozen shelves, doors, etc. The things fall apart, and replacement parts are hard to come by. When I gave it my annual cleaning this spring, the burners were still rock-solid. The grates are stainless and show no wear to speak of. Highly recommended. A couple of people I know have Napoleon and Vermont Casting BBQ's. They are also very happy. Bottom line, a good Q costs the best part of a G-note.
So much for gas. It is hard to beat a real charcoal jobbie, like a Weber round ball.
The draw-back of using the wood-chip-filled brick, is that it has to come to temperature before the 'charcoalification<G>' process to begin, wasting fuel. But once that thing starts wafting smoke into the ol' Q, look-out! Those meats take on a flavour, all smokey, right quick. I use alder, hickory, mesquite, apple... and even tried cherry (we didn't like that so much..as we didn't like oak or particle- board..LOL)
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wrote:

I use a cast-iron brick, with holes in the removable lid and I fill it with wood chips. It sits on the 'flavourizer' bars of my Weber. Ang and I broke down 10 years ago and dropped (what we thought was a lot) some serious coin on a BBQ. A Weber Silver B. Looking back, that was a very good decision. That thing has only cost me a $ 13.00 igniter. It lives outside and gets used year-round. People all around me have replaced their BBQ at least twice since then. Some have those massive all-stainless-looking monstrosities with the big fat knobs and a dozen shelves, doors, etc. The things fall apart, and replacement parts are hard to come by. When I gave it my annual cleaning this spring, the burners were still rock-solid. The grates are stainless and show no wear to speak of. Highly recommended. A couple of people I know have Napoleon and Vermont Casting BBQ's. They are also very happy. Bottom line, a good Q costs the best part of a G-note.
So much for gas. It is hard to beat a real charcoal jobbie, like a Weber round ball.
The draw-back of using the wood-chip-filled brick, is that it has to come to temperature before the 'charcoalification<G>' process to begin, wasting fuel. But once that thing starts wafting smoke into the ol' Q, look-out! Those meats take on a flavour, all smokey, right quick. I use alder, hickory, mesquite, apple... and even tried cherry (we didn't like that so much..as we didn't like oak or particle- board..LOL)
I hear that the Chinese particle boards adds a distinct flavor with a variety rare earth/heavy metals that will help preserve the meat.
basilisk
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Robatoy wrote:

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On Wed, 17 Jun 2009 14:19:38 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

A cupla' months ago I got a recipe for an interesting burger:
A regular patty however you like it, only instead of buns use grilled cheese sandwiches.
Apparently, there's bread out there that is thinner than usual, so you fit it in your mouth. Somebody on the bbq newsgroup made them and swore they were great.
-Zz
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LOL....
It does have three of the four major food groups: Cheese, butter, and beef. Natcherly, the fourth is beer. ;)
nb
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A friend of mine likes Krispy Kreme as a burger bun. Sick bastard...LOL
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