Operation of Tenoning Jig

Does anyone know of a book, manual or video on the operational uses of a tenoning jig used with a table saw? In my case, it's a Delta Model 34-184. The manual that came with the jig talks about "several methods in which a mortise-and-tenon can be cut", but only gives one example. It's not as easy as it might seem. Have been experimenting making tenons with various pieces of scrap wood, but am not necessarily happy with the results, especially the time when the saw blade came in contact with the jig's aluminum base.
Would like to learn how the professionals use the tool when making furniture. I made a plant stand for my wife and used my shaper table to cut the tenons with a 4 degree bevel on the structural shoulders of the rails to mate with outward angle of the legs. They results were fine, but it sure took a long time in the making.
Thanks for the help,
Art
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Art wrote:

The biggest problem imo w/ the current generation of tenoning jigs is they're too light since the old "real" jigs are now so expensive they appear to all have disappeared from production since the only market now is for individuals or small shops since large shops and manufacturers had almost universally gone to custom setups.
I don't know what the manual gives as example nor do you say what, in particular, you're finding difficult so don't know what specifically to recommend as a cure. However, for "routine" tenons, the best technique in my book is to use the double-blade with proper spacer and thus cut both sides of the tenon simultaneously. The face cut should almost always be cut first using a stop block as length-setter for consistency and then the cheeks. It is particularly important with these light jigs to hold them down on the table consistently or the weight of the material can cause them to not be perpendicular to the table. That's where the old-style large jigs had it all over the current ones--they weighed 40lb or so so were far more stable.
I don't know of a particular reference, however, as the old Delta/Rockwell writings on moulding and jointing I have seen years ago are no longer in print. Someone else will undoubtedly have some currently available info there (at least, hopefully).
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dpb wrote:

I'm always remembering the "one other thing I intended to add"... :)
I've intended to try to add additional weight to the recently-acquired Powermatic version I got cheaply at a sale to see how it could possibly be modified to perform more nearly like the old-style Delta. I'm convinced if I can find a place to mount at least another several pounds w/o interfering w/ the adjustments it would help significantly with it and with all the other essentially clones on the market...
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I have two of those jigs. They are older ones but they are both poorly made. I use one for tenoning if I have a large batch to cut otherwise I just use the miter gage to make the shoulder cut then cut the cheeks with my bandsaw. Final fitting is done with my shoulder plane.
Here are my tips. Set it up to cut the outside of the tenon first. Cut all of your pieces. Re-set to cut all of the other side. I have found that flipping the board over is more accurate (and safer) than resetting the jig to cut inside or close to the jig. Some use two blades separated by a spacer but I have found that method limits my ability to carefully fit the tenon to the mortise.
Make several test cuts first. Leave it fat and allow for trimming.
Oh ya, I use the second one as a spine jig. Its permanently set up for this.
Dave
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Different strokes... I really don't like the flip methods as any error in setup is doubled. Also, I prefer to reference all of my cuts from a single face. I don't know what technique/tool you use for mortises. I use a Delta benchtop mortiser, and I get pretty consistent results. That allows me to use the dual-blade w/ spacer method without fussing. I have marked a couple of my dado shims that I know work. I had to fuss once. Now I know exactly which shims to use.
Obviously your mileage varies.
Cheers,
Steve
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Art wrote:

No.
But I strongly advise you to be sure the work is securely clamped for each pass.
If by chance it is not clamped tight, the piece will tip forward onto the top of the blade and be catapulted back toward you.
--

FF


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The Delta manual is a parts breakdown and nothing more.
You need to invest several hours and many scrap boards into a self-learning process.
A hint: Look at all the joints on the box and see how many you can duplicate. **** scraps ****** not a real project until you feel VERY good about the setup.
Using the same blade will also be helpful.
Norm rarely shows the setup and test cuts involved in that critter.
I would also learn to create joints using a stop block and dado set.
PS: Do not attempt to cut the jig anymore, it dulls the hell out of the blade.
Art wrote:

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