One-piece drawer and frame

I have the idea that I would like to make the drawer false fronts for a line of base cabinet drawers (all the same size and at the same level) from the same 3/4 board as the face frame, so the grain matches along the whole row. The false fronts will be inset into the face frame, allowing a bandsaw kerf width all around the drawer. I can cross cut the board, rip out the drawer fronts, and glue the face frame back together (adjusting for the loss of the kerfs) and it will "probably" look pretty good, but it sure would be nice to have the face frame intact. I don't have any ideas about how to cut the rectangles out of the board without any starting point showing. I could trim out the edges of the fronts with contrasting strips to hide a wider starting point for a jigsaw but this would dilute the desired effect. Any advice would be appreciated.
Bill in Franklin
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[...]

Maybe with a saw like this: http://www.dick.biz/cgi-bin/dick.storefront/41e9611e003ae340273f50f3360905f0/Product/View/712845
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Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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Neat idea:
I'd think that cutting out the drawer fronts with a bandsaw is extremely brave, but for me, it's an invitation for error (I know my limits!!). It would really suck to make it to the last drawer and then make a mistake that can't be covered up.
Instead, why not take the plank you want to use and make it wider than you need (by two saw kerf widths). Rip the top and bottom rails off using a think kerf "glue-line" blade, and cross cut the center strip into your drawer fronts and stiles. Make a bunch of spaces of thickness equal to your saw kerf and glue the piece back together leaving out the drawer fronts.
I realize this will leave a kerf larger than you were originally looking for and it may not meet your requirements, but hopefully it gives you an idea or two.
Good luck Rob
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"Bill Hinshaw" < snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net> wrote in message
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....

Rip then crosscut. the frame will bo back together much better.
Another approach that I tried for thsis same problem on a smaller scale (cofee table aprom w/ drawer) was to make "veneer" and cut it out with a utility knife. I should have gone thinner my "veneer" was a heavy 1/8" thick. The resulted in a dut of ragget tearout.
-Steve
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I like this idea, Steve. Juergen's suggestion of using a Azebiki panel saw would solve the tear-out problem. I'm going to try your suggestion. If I rip the thin plank from the same board I subsequently rip and crosscut and reassemble, the drawer tops and inside edge of the drawer openings will look solid. Thanks for a great suggestion.
Bill

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