O/T: Small Towns

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Lew _________________________________________________ Those who grew up in small towns will laugh when they read this.
Those who didn't will be in disbelief and won't understand how true it is.
1) You can name everyone you graduated with.
2) You know what FFA & 4-H means.
3) You went to parties at a pasture, barn, gravel pit, or in the middle of a dirt road. On Monday you could always tell who was at the party because of the scratches on their legs from running through the woods when the party was busted. (See #6.)
4) You used to 'drag' Main over & over.
5) You whispered the 'F' word and your parents knew within the hour.
6) You scheduled parties around the schedules of different police officers, because you knew which ones would bust you and which ones wouldn't.
7) You could never buy cigarettes because all the store clerks knew how old you were (and if you were old enough, they'd tell your parents anyhow.) Besides, where would you get the money?
8) When you did find somebody old enough and brave enough to buy cigarettes, you still had to go out into the country and drive on back roads to smoke them.
9) You knew which section of the ditch you would find the beer your buyer dropped off.
10) It was cool to date somebody from the neighboring town.
11) The whole school went to the same party after graduation.
12) You didn't give directions by street names but rather by references. Turn by Nelson's house, go 2 blocks to Anderson 's, and it's four houses left of the track field.
13) The golf course had only 9 holes.
14) You couldn't help but date a friend's ex-boyfriend/girlfriend.
15) Your car stayed filthy because of the dirt roads, and you will never own a dark vehicle for this reason.
16) The town next to you was considered 'trashy' or 'snooty,' but was actually just like your town.
17) You referred to anyone with a house newer then 1940 as the 'rich' people.
18) The people in the 'big city' dressed funny, and then you picked up the trend 2 years later.
19) Anyone you wanted could be found at the local gas station (Pink Potty) or the dairybar. (Land's Drive-In)
20) You saw at least one friend a week driving a tractor through town or one of your friends driving a grain truck to school occasionally.
21) The gym teacher suggested you haul hay for the summer to get stronger.
22) Directions were given using THE stop light as a reference.
23) When you decided to walk somewhere for exercise, 5 people would pull over and ask if you wanted a ride.
24) Your teachers called you by your older siblings' names.
25) Your teachers remembered when they taught your parents.
26) You could charge at any local store or write checks without any ID.
27) There was no McDonalds.
28) The closest mall was over an hour away. (What was a mall?)
29) It was normal to see an old man riding through town on a riding lawn mower.
30) You've pee'd in a cornfield or on a road that had no traffic.
31) Most people went by a nickname.
32) You could by a candy bar for nickel.
33) You could go to the movies for a dime.
34) Saturday movies all had a cereal.
35) Ice cream cones were a nickel two dips for a dime.
36) A car hop took your order at the local drive-in.
37) Few students owned cars.
38) Gasoline was 20 cents per gal.
39) No TV's & not every one had phones.
40) Drive-in theaters were gre at for lovers.
41) You laughed your butt off reading this because you know it is true, and you forward it to everyone who may have lived in a small town.
I would not have wanted to have been raised any other way!!!!
Tough times don't last... Tough people do...
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42) You could buy cigarettes from a vending machine for a quarter.
42) You could buy penny candies at the corner store. Candy bars were a nickel and the new fancy BIG candy bars were a dime.
43) You could buy three loaves of bread or three gallons of milk for a dollar.
44) Fireworks were universally available to anybody of any age..
45) If you got into any kind of legal trouble, you went into the army. This was considered punishment and character development.
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46) you could go to the gas station, put in a bucks worth and scoop the loop all night.
47) nobody stopped at the stop sign at the railroad tracks through town, not even the cop. gotta love it
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Ross Hebeisen) wrote in

48) When your mother needed you for something, she just yelled out the back door.
49) You'd predict the weather by looking at the cows just outside town.
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On Thu, 24 Apr 2008 01:08:38 -0400, "Lee Michaels"

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"Lee Michaels" wrote:

"ROY!" wrote:

Still remember a Saturday night, walking to a buddy's house from the pool hall after it closed at midnight.
We stopped to have a smoke and while enjoying the "smoke", a squad car pulled up to check us out.
As part of that interview the officers suggested we might want to consider quitting smoking for a lot of reasons including cost.
One officer specifically commented about a $0.25/pack cost.
I quickly countered, "Oh no sir, I buy them for $1.95/carton, never use a vending machine."
Talk about the perception of youth and invincibility.
Lew
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Or
42) When you have been sent to get some items at the local market and when you get to the cashier, she tells you that your mother called and you also need to get a gallon of milk.
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On Thu, 24 Apr 2008 04:59:09 GMT, "Lew Hodgett"
I know you're just forwarding it so I'm not busting *your* chops...

I had to read it twice.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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<Grin>
Lew
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And the small convenience store used garage doors as the main entrance and it was called the Ice House.
You bought your Ice from the Ice House and it started out as a solid block of ice carried out side to be crushed and emptied into a paper bag.
The only grocery store had red stained wooden floors and they delivered.
The Chevrolet dealer was the gas station and had 5 new pick up trucks on display across the highway.
You disposed of your own trash, you burned it or hauled it to the dump your self.
Widow's or Widower's were known as Old Lady Smith or Old Man Smith.
Every one lived on or one block off the highway.
It was dark at night.
You dressed up to go to the grocery store.
The trip to the grocery store was a social event.
Repairmen had to come from several towns away.
15 minutes from home meant you were in another town.
There were no cross walks, street curbs, or street drains.
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*snip*

Except for down town, where they had curbs and maybe a cross walk on one corner.
Puckdropper
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On 24 Apr 2008 13:06:53 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

If you had curbs you weren't in a small town. And small towns don't have "down towns." You either live in town or you go to town.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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"LRod" wrote

Case in point: even if you live in Snyder, TX, you are not _from_ "Snyder", but _from_ "Scurry County" instead.
When greeting/welcoming a stranger, even the townies always say "Welcome to Scurry County!".
I took that as a result of the decidedly rural nature of the area, where many/preponderance of the folks indeed live on ranches.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 3/27/08
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Or Stanton Tx, Billboard proclaimed " The biggest Town in Martin County". It was the only town in Martin County. Claimed to have 2000 friendly people and 1 old grouch!

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Half this stuff was true even if you lived in a "not so small town", depending on when you are talking about, and much of it was not true even in a tiny town where "you are now entering" and "you are now leaving" were on opposite sides of the same post. The pricing in particular.
I grew up in a small town (not a village) about 15 miles and 2 towns from the "city" in the fifties/sixties.
We had one stoplight, no movie theatre, and when we first moved there one public school and one "district" high school. 4 grocery store, 2 hardware stores, 2 restaurants and one "variety" store. Within a couple years a second elementary was built as the town grew. IIRC there were 7 churches. 2 feed mills plus The farm supply Co-op) and 4 gas stations
I remember the 5 cent "flip" pop, penny candy,7 cent Royal Crown, nickel bags of chips, etc. EVERYBODT walked to school - or perhaps biked (particularly the kids from just out of town)
The big difference between tiny towns, small towns, and the nearby city was the cops.
Tiny towns were policed by the OPP (Ontario Provincial Police - the "Provies) Small towns had a one or two man force. For a while our cheif of police was the former dog catcher, and local bootlegger.
We always said a "small town" was one so small it had to import the local drunk -( which ruled us out)
At the public school level you not only knew everyone who graduated with you, but most of the rest of the kids as well by name (and who their older siblings were) Being a "district" highschool with kids bussed in from 30 miles or so you didn't know EVERYONE in your year, but by graduation I knew better than 80% of the kids in my year by name and what village/area they came from (school of about 1000 kids at the time)
I grew up in a small town, and wouldn't have had it any other way.
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You're not talking about town, then, you're talking about a row of houses that are lucky to even have their own speed limit sign. A town's got to have a place to get the odd nut or bolt, be it hardware store or Joe's Service Station.
Of course, most of my experience with small towns comes from when gas was $.899 a gallon, so cars were fairly well supported. The curb (or more specifically, the 4" drop off of the sidewalk) was to keep cars away from people.
Puckdropper
--
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To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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"Puckdropper" wrote:

AKA: "A wide place in the road", at least how my dad defined it.

That's a Metropolis<G>
Lew
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On 24 Apr 2008 21:01:40 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

feed mill, a diner, a garage, a Grange, a blacksmith shop, and maybe two churches. You can preface every one of those establishments with "small" but it would be redundant.
Most of those are gone, now. The post office was replaced with a modern building in the '60s across the street, the school was phased out and consolidated with others in the township, the library moved next to one of the churches, the VFD is still there, the grocery stores were replaced by a chain supermarket in the next town, the feed mill is now a convenience store, the diner is still there, the garage has come and gone so many times I'm not sure what's there now, the Grange is gone, the blacksmith shop actually may have closed when I was a kid, the churches are still churches, but they have bigger parking lots now because of the businesses which are gone.

No curbs. One flashing red light. The one sidewalk I remember was incidental to the front of the PO and the two side-by-side grocery stores--it existed nowhere else, and not at all, now.
That's a town. It's not a wide spot in the road. It's not a row of houses (the "main" street had maybe two houses on it--all the other houses were on side streets).
Current population from a questionable source is <4000. I would have said 7-800 when I was growing up.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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*snip*
One town I lived in had a population of around 750, but curbs on several streets. They might have done that with their proximity to the court house, but they had curbs. "Downtown" was a grocery store and "find it yourself" hardware store, bait machine, boat sales, grain elevator, bank, restaurant, and even a laundramat.
The next town over, had a population of around 1200, but no grocery store.
Puckdropper
--
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To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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Puckdropper wrote:

hay day (1950's) it had a hotel, post office, hospital, doctors office, drug store, barbershop/poolhall, 2 grocery stores, 2 hardwares/lumber yards,2 cafes, blacksmiths, 2 garages,2 farm equipment sales, a high school and a bank. It had a population of around 500. Mostly closed down now except for a grocery store and a hotel. Population is still the same.
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