New shop snake part 2

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My Ex is proof that I ain't afraid of much... but snakes you can keep. Don't like them.
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That's what I like about the Yukon, no snakes or skunks except for Tory politicians.
Luigi
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In article

The only poisonous snake we have in the UK is the Adder, rarely fatal except to the very young or very frail. Also very rarely found.
The skunks here are Labour politicians.
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On Wed, 11 Nov 2009 22:07:32 +0000 (GMT), Stuart

We have timber rattlers, water moccasins, pigmy rattler, and copperhead. Copperheads are common, shy, but you always need to know where you are putting your hands and feet. We also have large black rat snakes, some 7 feet long, but these are harmless and feast on copperheads.
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"Phisherman" wrote:

If that is the same black snake I know, they do a better job than a cat around the barn keeping the rat/mouse population under control.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

And, actually, keeping the cat population down is one of their useful functions as well when the coyotes get lazy... :)
--
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dpb wrote:

My cats always got along well with black snakes. They'd play together for hours. Neither one ever seemed to hurt the other.
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Phisherman wrote:

OK, you win. Arizona is viper-poor compared to that inventory -- thank goodness.

IIRC, they can only bite at the flaps of skin (between fingers, toes, etc) because they can't open their mouths wide enough to strike other parts of an adult human -- is that correct or am I thinking of a different viper?

--

There is never a situation where having more rounds is a disadvantage

Rob Leatham
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I had heard that about the poisonous sea snakes but never about a Copperhead.
--


Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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Joe AutoDrill wrote:

A copperhead is a pit viper, same family as rattlesnakes and cottonmouths, but different genus. They can put a fang into any part of you, and like all pit vipers have long retractile fangs that can go through quite a bit of clothing. Here's a copperhead yawning, but with fangs retracted http://www.flickr.com/photos/11304433@N00/459385883 /. Here's one with fangs out--note the sheath around the fangs that slides back as the fangs go in http://www.flickr.com/photos/11051247@N08/3842903770 /. Here's a copperhead skull--you can see the fangs more clearly http://www.flickr.com/photos/malodora/3048537228 /.
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Beautiful photos... Thanks for sharing.
All my life, I've loved snakes and even owned over 100 at one point, but since marrying a woman with a death-fear of MICE and RATS it's hard to own anything that's really any fun any more.
--


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Joe Agro, Jr.
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Joe AutoDrill wrote:

I'd like to claim credit for them but they aren't mine. It's amazing what you can find by searching flickr.com.

Well, if she's afraid of mice and rats then she should enjoy watching the snakes eat them.
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Exactly!!! Go figure.
We tried breaking her of her fear with a baby Corn Snake a few years ago but... Alas, no luck.
--


Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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One of the aggressive snakes - along with the Timber Rattlesnake A large size one. Normally it takes only one lunge to kill.
Martin
Joe AutoDrill wrote:

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Mark & Juanita wrote:

Sounds like you are describing a coral snake ... although they don't really have to chew on you, they do bite more than strike. Common in this part of the country (TX).
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Swingman wrote:

That's it. Coral snakes were the ones I was thinking of.

--

There is never a situation where having more rounds is a disadvantage

Rob Leatham
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wrote:

there are 36 different kinds of rattle snakes. arizona has 13 of them, more than any other state.
http://www.azgfd.gov/w_c/arizona-rattlesnakes.shtml
regards, charlie cave creek, az
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In NC, we had 4 types of poisonous snakes: Copperheads, rattler, coral and cotton mouth, depending on what part of the state you were in. In Raleigh, where we lived, I never saw a coral snake and think they were limited to the southern part of the state. However, having lived one summer as a kid on an island in a southern Arkansas bayou, I KNOW that a cotton mouth looks like and how they act. The experts tell us that they don't exist as far north as Raleigh. <grin>
One afternoon, I was walking down the creek behind our home toward the lake. It was about a 1/4mile stroll and I loved looking at the plants growing on the creek bank. As I rounded a corner, I found myself about 10' away from two very fat cotton mouths lounging in a dead tree in the creek. One slid off his branch into the water and started swimming toward me.
Trust me, this old fat boy can walk on water when he's sufficiently motivated. I 'walked' clear back to the house, removing Mr. Browning's 12 gauge from my basement office and returned to the creek. Both of my newfound friends were in their tree again, so I liquefied both, saving the heads to show my friend, who taught Biology at NCSU.
Copperheads were common as dirt in the yard and loved sliding around under the pine straw used as mulch around the house's foundation and naturally in the pine woods. You soon learned that if you were going to remove the cover of a lawn sprinkler's valve box, you did it with a screwdriver since a copperhead would undoubtedly be inside. They'd always just slither away. None of the family ever had a problem with them, other than being surprised by them when you'd scare one up.
While the same fellow who had assured me that there were no cottonmouths in the Raleigh area told me that there WERE rattlers, I never saw any, and the same can be said for coral snakes, though folk would see a King and mistakenly call it a coral. Remember, red against yellow, kill a fellow. Red against black, venom lack.
It's the corals that have a very tiny mouth, but they make up for it with a neurotoxin venom and were considered to be the most deadly of the NC snakes.
As an aside, copperheads took a toll on dogs and particularly on cats.
--
Nonny

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On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 18:07:41 -0500, Phisherman wrote:

We found one in the school yard in grade school. Didn't know it was dangerous so we picked it up and played with it till recess was over. Took it in the classroom and teacher had a fit. We took it back out and turned it loose :-).
We either got one that was very mild mannered or they are reluctant to bite.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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Larry Blanchard said:

They hide under stuff, tend to be shy, but even the little ones will draw up on ya if'n ya mess with 'em. Maybe they're just meaner here.
When my sister was 4, she stepped on a piece of plywood and out came a big 4-5 foot copperhead. She called out to me, "Look at the big worm." It was hard to convince her not to make sudden movements while I got the neighbor and his pistol to shoot the thing. They both stayed 2 feet apart, transfixed, all the while. Dude down the street ate it.
Greg G.
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