New drill/driver

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On Fri, 13 Jun 2014 19:56:02 -0400, "Morgans"

Maybe under our current technology, but that can change. But, if we're both still alive in ten years and enough of my memory is intact, I'll email to say "told you so". :)
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On Fri, 13 Jun 2014 21:13:52 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

No problem. I've email myself and dated it to go out in ten years. :)
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On 6/13/14, 7:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

Not unless you're talking about something different than a battery. If we're talking batteries.... well, there's a reason the dry cell has barely changed in size in the last century.
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On 6/13/2014 9:15 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

I'm thinking way too much stuff runs on a hand full of sizes.
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wrote:

Huh? What physical or chemical limits did SawStop go up against?
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On 6/13/2014 10:38 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

It had mentality barriers to get through.
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wrote:

Over the last number of years the current capacity of a simple AA or a simple 9 volt battery has increased significantly - particularly in the rechargeable versions I remember 80mah 9 volt ni-cads. 350mah Nimh are now pretty standard, with Lithiums going over 600mah
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On 6/13/14, 10:15 PM, Leon wrote:

The basic volt/amp sizes have barely changed in since the invention off the dry cell. Simple physics/chemistry. Heck, even electric cars are basically a zillion AAs tied together.
The size of a 1.5volt dry cell at a certain amperage has remained the same for a century, no matter the material inside.
That can't be said of many other technologies over the past 100 years.
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On 6/13/14, 11:55 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'll give you that. But I just don't see a logarithmic scale happening here, like you see in other technologies. If the chemistry of the dry cell was as advancing as say, the speed of microprocessors, we'd have drills that you only charged once a year. :-)
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On Sat, 14 Jun 2014 00:55:58 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'm thinking the possibility of transmitted power, such as electromagnet beamed power. Small receiver on a drill and off you go. Of course, some advances need to be done, but what I'm talking about already exists in it's early stages.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gIpUqlhXNFQ

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wrote:

And if you hit something they wouldn't go through, they'd either snap your wrist like a nono-toothpick or throw youhalfway to mars with their uber-torque. "if automobiles had advanced as quickly as computers, by 2000 we'd have been driving at twice the speed of light while riding on the head of a pin - in 1990 that would have been the speed of sound on a postage stamp"
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On Sat, 14 Jun 2014 01:32:19 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

And if you listen to the detractors of wifi and other EMI, we'll all sport 3rd eyeballs, and be dying of cancer by age 12.
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My opinion of Ridgid just went up a notch. Oh, alright, two notches :)
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wrote:

That's a lot easier than rewriting physics.
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I think I am going in a different direction for a bit. I have an ancient Makita 14.4 ni cad (which I thought was working well for me, but reading this makes me realize how clueless I am) that will pull the balls of a rhino. I spent $329 for it about << 9 >> years ago. While I have killed a few batteries, the smart charger does well with itself, and the helical cut bronze gears in the drill make it solid as the day I bought it. The chuck is an American made Jacobs with carbide liners and it will still grip a 1/16" to 1/2" with the same precision.
It has drilled thousands of holes, and driven many times that of screws. But the drill is large and weighs a bunch. Still, I will be undone if anything happens to it as it is my cabinet hanging monster.
It still works fine. But I am taking a look at this tool set for the first time.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/203406854?cm_sp=Homepage-_-Hero-_-Shop_This_Combo
My electrician uses it for all kinds of drilling, screw driving, and has even use it with a wire brush to clean up fixtures. He uses the hell out of both the drill and the driver every single day. He is on his third set. According to him, they last about 2 1/2 to 3 years, and then he simply tosses them. I have never had any of my DeWalt or Hitachi drills last longer than that.
I have several entry door replacements coming up, and I will see if it will bore a hole in a 1 3/4 door. If it will, I am in. I have to have a really light touch with the rhino killer when running in all the door hinge screws, and there will be a few hundred of them if I get all the work I have bid. <snip? --------------------------------------------------------------------- Do you think Harbor Freight might be on to something?
The above would be a classic HF item.
Lew
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On Saturday, June 14, 2014 5:30:50 PM UTC-5, Swingman wrote:

ch of accountants/investors/efficiency engineers that are working to maximi ze the dollar from manufacturing widgets.

Testify! Applied to pretty much everything these days, I have found myself less and less concerned with branding.
On Saturday, June 14, 2014 5:01:26 PM UTC-5, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Absolutely. I have commented over the years that I have steadily watched t he quality of HF tools go up and the quality of higher priced, badged tools go down. And with HF's in store exchange guarantee, it is hard to beat th em, too. The only problem I have with HF is that some of their tools are r eally pretty good and the service life to price is an excellent ratio. But some of their tools just aren't that good. But they are expanding so fast and improving so much they just might make a credible name for themselves across the board one day.
Robert
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Yep, I feel the same way. It is an interesting business model. Open up a bunch of stores. Sell tools at a super discounted price and expand quickly. Essentially open up a bunch of stores selling crap. Then...... , once you have people coming into the stores, start to improve the quality of the tools. Which is the exact reversal of other tool company's approach.
I was looking at some of the reviews recently of some of their power tools. Years ago, there were complaints about a tool was just fine except for one part. Then the complaints stopped. Apparently, they fixed that one part. I think that Harbor Freight deal with their customer base as one big research and development lab. Make a tool cheap and see what the people say. Then order an improvement based on the complaints. Over time, the tool improves
I am not sure I approve of that model. But as a business-customer service model. It is probably better than trading on an old reputation for quality while making crappier and crappier tools. Like you say Robert, more and more tools are meeting somewhere in the middle.
As far as cordless tools are concerned, most people I have talked to have indicated that they are buying new tools based on the batteries they now have. Makes sense the the big companies sell packages of tools and batteries to get you in the door. After that, you don't want to make an investment in new batteries and chargers. So you buy that brand for other tools
I have been following this discussion and went and looked at the Ryobi tools. They have a number of 40 volt tools for working in the yard. Including lawnmowers and a chain saw. One lawnmower carried two batteries. So when one battery runs out, you just swap them and finish the job. And an eclectic chainsaw for landscaping or the odd emergency, that is perfect. Obviously can't do a lot of cutting, but for small jobs, just perfect.
I haven't made the investment in a lot of cordless tools. But with the cheaper versions of these tools getting better and better and the Lithium ion batteries becoming so prevalent, I may not be able to hold off much longer.
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*snip*

*snip*

Black & Decker had an interesting drill concept a short time ago. I bought one of their interchangable drills last year, and thought the idea was pretty good. It had a module that was driven by a single motor, so if you wanted to change from drill to driver, you popped off the drill module and popped on the driver module. It seemed to work alright, but I took it back because the motor/gears sounded like it was grinding rocks.
I never did try the impact driver module, based on the gear noises I knew I was taking the thing back and getting something else.
I think someone here mentioned it and was impressed with the demo unit he had.
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 15 Jun 2014 00:23:24 GMT, Puckdropper

I don't even consider a Black and Decker tool newer than about 30 years to be a tool. In my experience they are pretty much all JUNK.
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wrote:

You can't go by brand names any more. It all depends on where the giant holding company decides to shift that brand today.
While I won't seek out B&D, if someone gives a good review I'm willing to listen. Sometimes even a cost-conscious brand (i.e. cheap) puts out a good tool once in a while.
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