Moving

Hi everyone. Because my life is a soap opera, I have to move now. The good news is that I probably will have six weeks to do it. I'm currently in a three car garage, but I have to share it with a multitude of bicycles, lawn equipment, and other junk. So really, I have maybe a 2.5 car garage. An external storage barn is the ideal solution, but not really doable before the move. So I have two questions:
1. If you were moving your shop into a completely new three car garage, what would you do? What has hindsight taught you?
I plan to insulate the instant I get there. I also plan to build in more storage up near the ceiling as well as more lumber storage. I also plan to make a large shelf about 3'-4' wide and the height and depth of the garage to store all the junk, hoping to get back more floor space. I also plan to put in a sub panel with at least 60 amp service. I may do 100 this time. There's 200 amp service to the house.
2. How would you move the tools? At the moment, I'm planning one of those 6'x12' flat bed open uhaul trailer and an engine crane to lift the tools onto the trailer. My heaviest tool is probably 600lbs. Do you have a better way? Luckily, the house we're going to is about a 30 second drive down the road, but too far to just push the tools on their casters. Three of the tools (DP, 14" bandsaw with riser block, and 80 gal upright compressor) are real tippy. Any advice there?
Thanks.
brian
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My advice would be to first plan where the tools are going to go and run at least the main lines your dust collection before filling the shop up with tools. It's easier to do it without climbing around your tools. I also recommend putting your table at least 9' or so right in front of one of the garage doors so you can carry an 8' sheet of plywood straight in to rip it. That's a lot easier than spinning it around.
my 2 cent
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Rick Nagy
Johnstown, PA
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Rick's Cabinet Shop wrote:

I was thinking that I would put everything in the center of the garage so I could get to the walls. But you're right, it's better just to do the mods first. I guess I should take advantage of the six weeks.
brian
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wrote:

The one thing I'm facing now that my shop is finally rocked and painted is something I wish I had done three years ago before I populated the whole thing with tools: painting the floor. That may be the most important thing that you can do in the next six weeks.
I really want one of the two part epoxy finishes, the first step of which is an acid wash. I know I can access half the floor at a time by moving all the tools (all of my big iron is on mobile bases) to one side, but I'm concerned about the fumes from the acid, so I'm probably not going to do that.
That leaves the uncomfortable option of rolling everything next door if I can get the widder lady that lives there to loan me half of her garage for a few days. I might be able to get everything into my utility trailer, but three wheeled bases don't go up a two board ramp very well.

Thanks. That answers the one question I had.
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LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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LRod wrote:

Unfortunately, this is probably not doable. It's a rental ($12,000 a year property taxes, special ed kid needs this school district). I'm already pushing the envelope. The guy who owns the house is real laid back so I shouldn't have too much trouble with putting in a subpanel for example. I wouldn't want to paint the floor though. The subpanel might go unnoticed if I hide it behind the dust collector. The floor would smack you in the face. :-)
I agree though. After insulating, I considered putting OSB up and painting it white. I'm not sure if I want the expense though.
brian
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The guy who owns the house is real laid

I would just ask if he minded if you painted the floor in the garage. After all if he gets his house back with a painted garage floor why would this be a bad thing? The same goes for the sub panel. If the sub, panel is up to code even if future tenants or buyers never used more than the ceiling lamps in the garage what harm would it be?
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Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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LRod wrote:

Forgive a stupid question.. But why is it a good idea to paint the floor? What benefits are there?
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bf wrote:

Makes the shop brighter, cuts down on moisture transfer through the concrete, cuts down on concrete dust.
Chris
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bf wrote:

A slick surface would be easier to sweep. And a light color would brighten up the shop.
brian
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"brianlanning" wrote

is particularly important with small fasteners and ageing eyes.
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Concrete unprotected is in a constant state of deterioration. That translates to dust and pitting--the former of which is an annoyance on several levels, and the latter of which makes it progressively more difficult to sweep up chips, cutoffs, and, uh, dust.
I let the basement in my shop in Illinois go too many years before putting something down (I built the house, compounding the felony). There were some spots, particularly where traffic was heaviest, that had quite a bit of pitting. I could have prevented that by painting in the first year.
The garage I'm using in my house now is over 30 years old (I've been here 3) and the floor isn't in as bad shape as my basement floor was, but I'd sure like to catch it now before it gets worse.
Some of the other responses address the issue as well.
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LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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Instead of OSB have you thougt of peg board for the top half or the full wall? I did my entier wall with and have not regreted it. Just pait it first while it is flat on the floor.
Joe M.

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JOE MOHNIKE wrote:

I considered it. You can screw into osb which I think might make it win. Maybe a mixture would be good. I guess it depends on the price also.
brian
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