Most dangerous tool in shop

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wrote:

An unsharpened chisel used normally.
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On Tuesday, August 26, 2003 at 10:59:40 PM UTC-5, Sweet Sawdust wrote:

When i think of dangerous I don't think of the sander. Granted I have had a couple of close manicures with my oscillating drum sander. I think many will agree, as some have already, it is the table saw. I was nicked by a s pinning blade probably 5-10 seconds after I turned mine off several years a go. Stupid mistake that got me an evening in the emergency room, a chipped bone under a nasty abrasion and some antibiotic shots.
But I also discovered, also several years ago, that a wood lathe can be a s leeping dog. I mounted a glued up rather heavy piece of stock made from 2x 4 to make a simple over sized dowel for a project. I started the machine a t about 300rpm to round it up and after about ten seconds I was hit smack i n the middle of the full face shield. Thank goodness I was wearing it. I never saw the stock leave the lathe. I remember impact and a stinging sens ation. I looked down and the work-piece was draped across my arms that wer e still extended in the working position; and I realized there was blood on the shield. The piece had split out allowing it to fly out of the lathe a nd as best I could figure it bounced off of the bed and then up to the shie ld. The flexible face shield had deflected into my face striking my glasse s. The stinging sensation and blood were from the left nose-piece and the rims of my glasses scraping my nose and eyebrow. Minor abrasions but thank god I was wearing the shield. two of the four snaps that attach the shiel d to the hood were busted loose. Scared the #$@% out of me and I never mou nted another work piece without a good inspection.
Bill hit it on the head. The brain. The table saw accident was a moment of carelessness after I turned the machine off. The lathe incident might not have been avoidable. But as I said, I always check my stock carefully bef ore mounting it on the lathe.
RonB
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out of me

It didn't take long to learn to always wear a face shield (get a good one) when turning the lathe on. I've been hit in the shield twice since getting my lathe.
I saw pictures of a grinder wheel break up, and a description of what was going on. That was enough for me to decide not to stand near the grinder as it was spinning up. Imagine a machine throwing rocks at 3600 RPM.

Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On Wednesday, February 4, 2015 at 4:26:52 AM UTC-6, Puckdropper at dot wrote:

Yeah - I approach the grinder pretty much as I approach the table saw. I try to keep my body away from the plane of the wheel. Even there you can get buggered.
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On Wednesday, February 4, 2015 at 9:59:17 AM UTC-6, RonB wrote:

Come to think of it, I would also add radial arm saw to the list of tools that can hurt you if you have a thought lapse.
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I'm not going to pick on the RAS only: Any tool that involves spinning a blade can hurt you right quick. I've got a Dremel Saw Max that spins a little 4" blade. Sure wouldn't take very long for it to hurt you.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 2/4/2015 8:48 PM, RonB wrote:

I wouldn't dismiss the ubiquitous "box-cutter" either. (don't ask)
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wrote:

Uh, oh! Here we go again! ;-)
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On Thu, 5 Feb 2015 01:49:05 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@rahul.net (Edward A. Falk) wrote:

Over the last 63 years the common coping saw has removed more skin and drawn more blood than any other woodworking tool - and most of that was before I was 14!!.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I was thinking of that one too, same time period too. It's funny how the blade can find your fingers on the back of the workpiece, isn't it? ; )
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wrote:

a pretty good one from a dull jack-knife.
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snipped-for-privacy@rahul.net (Edward A. Falk) wrote in new.rahul.net:

A good point - the most dangerous tool is the one you don't respect...
John
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