Metrication.

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You'd have ask over there - stud construction is something I wasn't familiar with until after I got to the US. As a kid over there, there was no such thing as studs. I remember a garage being built in the yard for our car. It was built brick by brick. No wood or metal in the walls until the roof/attic support.
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Best regards
Han
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I would think most every one out side the US and certainly in europe the wood workers work with the metric system vs the imperial.

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To quote Dave Barry:
"Thus the metric system did not really catch on in the States, unless you count the increasing popularity of the nine-millimeter bullet."
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Funny I was just reading about that. This is known as the .357 magnum calibre.
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To quote Dave Barry:
"Thus the metric system did not really catch on in the States, unless you count the increasing popularity of the nine-millimeter bullet."

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Just to pick nits, a .357 caliber bullet actually does measure .357 inches. A 9mm bullet is .355 inches.
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There is always an easy solution to every human problem -- neat,
plausible, and wrong." (H L Mencken)
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I have been told they are the same calibre.
Is a 9mm bore exactly 9mm, though. I would be sure the format of the bullet would be different, even if the bore was identical.
Not where I originally found it but... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caliber
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"Larry W" wrote in message Just to pick nits, a .357 caliber bullet actually does measure .357 inches. A 9mm bullet is .355 inches.
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On 2/21/2011 6:15 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Most films (i know, i know, what's a film?) were measured in mm
8mm 16mm 35mm 70mm 120
etc.
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Steve Barker
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Josepi wrote:

Ever had a friend who stopped smoking, drinking, or eating meat? Or started jogging, losing weight or _____(fill in blank)? Or discovered a new religion? Remember how they bragged and nagged trying to get you to do the same? I think everyone has a little missionary in them.
We (USA) have always used inches, pounds and gallons and are happy and comfortable with them. Will changing to the metric system make us happier, live longer, lose weight or sleep better? I don't think so. Foreign manufacturers use metric and I can put up with finding a wrench to fit, but when they start preaching to us to change the way we live and do things I balk.
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Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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Even if it makes more sense than that ancient British system, eh? Loyalty to the Queen and all that rot, eh? You want to stick with the speedometer reading in Furlongs Per Fortnight, so be it. Yessiree, Bob, I guess you'll show the world who's the smarter one, eh? The rest of the planet will reduce errors by using a simplified metric system. I grew up with metric, came to Canada and switched to inches, then the country switched to metric... by now I'm pretty well versed in either, but I use inches in my shop, but metric on my CNC.
Gawd... some people...
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Robatoy wrote:

Amen!
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Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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:> Foreign manufacturers use metric and I can put up with finding a :> wrench to fit, but when they start preaching to us to change the way :> we live and do things I balk. : Even if it makes more sense than that ancient British system, eh?
Yeah, but it doesn't.
: The rest of the planet will reduce errors by using a simplified metric : system.
Do you have any citations on error rates to back that up?
-- Andy Barss
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wrote:

It makes more sense only when learning it. After it is learned, there is no difference other than preference.

I have never seen own so marked. Do you have an exaple you can show?

How so?

I use inches for both.
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http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/Why_So_Serious.jpg
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*snip*

If a device is all metric or all standard, no problem. I can work in either system, but if the device is split between the two systems the annoyance levels go way up. Why should I have to have both my 12mm and 1/2" wrenches out when trying to put something together? They're almost the same size, might as well make them one or the other.
Puckdropper
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<puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Been There and Done That. I owned four GM vehicles that were made between 1978 and 1986, and all four of them had a mix of metric and SAE fasteners. It cranked up my blood pressure every time I had to make a repair on one of them -- never knew which socket set I was going to need. But my son's 96 Firebird is all metric. Thank goodness.
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Yep. I found that if a part bolted into the engine block, it was SAE. If it was an accessory or body bolt, it was metric. That was a full sized 87 Chevy van.
I recently got a 06, but have not done much wrench turning yet. New engine design, so probably metric. I hope it is all metric, like you said.
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Jim in NC


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I'd expect so. I'm not sure when GM finally went all-metric, but evidently it was sometime between '86 and '96. We had a '96 Roadmaster before my other son wrecked it. Replacement was a '96 Saturn. A few years later, we bought another Saturn, a '99. My FIL has a '97 LeSabre that I do the maintenance on. All four of these cars are all-metric, just like my son's '96 Firebird -- so I have a hard time imagining that anything newer has gone back to SAE fasteners.
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On 2/22/2011 6:16 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

When that happens I just grab 2 crescents; my 12" and my 304 mm and I am ready for either one.
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Robert Allison
New Braunfels, TX
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Embarassingly that just happened to me over the weekend (except for the dramatic ending) while using two different tapes, one marked largely with feet, one not. Measured for two notches spaced 5' 3 1/4" from one end on a 12' long 1x10. Rough cut the notches at 53 1/4". I went to dry fit it for fine tuning and was astonished I got THAT far off. Consistently 10" too short. I replaced the board, destroyed the evidence and wasn't going to tell anyone. Then I read this! Thanks! Scott
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The other common mistake for me and students is to measure with the tape right side up, the measure upside down, and count the fraction on the wrong side of the inch mark.
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Jim in NC


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