Marc Spagnuolo - The Money Whisperer!

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On 11/7/2012 9:12 AM, Swingman wrote:

IIRC SYP is/was the preferred wood to use in the south because of its resistance to insects.
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On 11/6/2012 8:30 AM, Leon wrote: ...

...
From SYP Association web site...

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On 11/7/2012 8:50 AM, dpb wrote:

Not going to believe that unless you post that 3 more times. :~)
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Unfortunately, you've treated the end cuts three times now and the board ends will never dry out.
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On 11/6/2012 8:05 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Gotta admit I'm not familiar with that particular requirement under any building code that I've built under. But that is not to say that it is not a requirement in one of the many iterations of building codes, particularly local/municipalities additions to same.
Logically, and since PT is supposedly saturated with the preservative, I can't imagine that being a requirement, but then again stranger things have happened ...
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On 11/6/2012 11:25 AM, Swingman wrote:

I think it might be safe to assume that different locations do have different building codes and that the highly recommended builder in this situation probably did things right, especially knowing going in that things were going to be filmed for the public to see.
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wrote:

That's what blew me away about that construction. But most, if not all, states have gone to using the International codes now. Some states, counties, and cities have added restrictions on top of those to enhance them.
http://www.reedconstructiondata.com/building-codes/arizona / AZ uses 2006 IBC, OR uses 2009 IBC, Texas uses 2003 IBC.
-- While we have the gift of life, it seems to me that only tragedy is to allow part of us to die - whether it is our spirit, our creativity, or our glorious uniqueness. -- Gilda Radner
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On 11/6/2012 8:01 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

That's for state work only, and the state does very little residential construction ... the local jurisdictions make their own choices.
Currently it's IRC 2006 for most jurisdictions in this part of Texas.
On 11/6/2012 7:52 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:> http://www.awpa.com /references/official.asp
> http://www.awpa.com/references/official.asp I got curious myself. > Best Practices call for painting drilled holes and cuts.
You left out a most vital element:
"Exceptions can be made when the wood is a thick sapwood species such as Southern pine, has very little heartwood, and appears to be well treated."
SYP is 99.999% of Engineering and Architectural spec's for framing in this neck of the woods.
Even if you can show me a cite requiring painting ends and holes in treated lumber in an actual residential building code in use in the US, it still does not mean it is required in all jurisdictions, or that it is even a "best practice", depending upon the material.
So much for "it's on the Internet and everything on the Internet has to be true, right"?
And I'm a French model ... Baawhn jyour! :)
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On 11/7/2012 8:27 AM, Swingman wrote:

Seems to me that treating the ends would seem logical. BUT Will a topical treatment of the ends last longer than the wood? What if the wood shrinks and the stuff simply peals off. It should protect for the life of the wood to be of any value, not just for the next 5~10 years.

WE! WE!
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Our state says that everyone works to the same code. Residential has their section and Commercial has their section.

Still, the IRC is International, and that's the point I was making. The world is getting away from country-based codes (or lack thereof) to make buildings safer worldwide. More strict is OK, less not so.

Exceptions are neither the law nor best practices. It appears that our Doug Fir is like your SYP. It lasts as well outside on decks as the currently feeble pressure treatment of truly nasty wood they sell as PT lumber any more.

Interesting. What's SYP? Never seen it. ;) Anyway, is it specified for sill plates or other possibly wet areas? Seeing the one green stud there with the jbolt through it in the video, I doubt it is in Aridzona.

OK. If that's your stance, you live with it. We've already determined that we need to go with the code, but I never said it was required in all jurisdictions nor did I state that it is for all materials. I was talking specifically about PT. Stop stirrin' the shit, mon.

Oh, please. <sigh> Those were industry standards sites.

Breed and license number, please.
-- While we have the gift of life, it seems to me that only tragedy is to allow part of us to die - whether it is our spirit, our creativity, or our glorious uniqueness. -- Gilda Radner
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On 11/8/2012 8:15 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

You brought it up, and gave the cite to bolster your point ... so if you had indeed read it, you would know that the quote above is taken directly from your cite, and _is_ from the "best practices".
You really DO need to read that Google acquired knowledge in its entirety, Bubba. ;)

Nuff said, Larry ... if you are not familiar the various types/classifications/grades of construction lumber, it is even more apparent that you are letting Google do your talking

Some of us put wisdom/knowledge in the body of the post, you seem to be relying solely on your taglines. :)
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When I came up against something I wasn't certain on, I asked for your help. This is what I get? Thanks, Teach.
-- While we have the gift of life, it seems to me that only tragedy is to allow part of us to die - whether it is our spirit, our creativity, or our glorious uniqueness. -- Gilda Radner
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On 11/8/2012 3:05 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

What you got was an answer that you did not like.
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wrote:

That's absolutely true.
-- While we have the gift of life, it seems to me that only tragedy is to allow part of us to die - whether it is our spirit, our creativity, or our glorious uniqueness. -- Gilda Radner
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On 11/8/2012 8:15 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

So you don't have PT SYP? That is probably your complaint with PT if you don't. And is fir termite resistant?

SYP, Southern Yellow Pine. Harder than a few hard woods.

I suppose the problem here is that we have much better PT than you. Our PT is SYP. And again we have different grades of PT where the penetration goes very deep inside the wood.

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PT doesn't get all the way inside, it only sinks in 1/4" max from what I've seen around here and in CA. Cut ends are entirely untreated and prone to rot.
http://www.awpa.com/references/official.asp I got curious myself. Best Practices call for painting drilled holes and cuts.
The pressure treated wood in Whispy's video was the absolute worst I've ever seen, if those sills were all PT. Even the green one looked as if it had been sprayed lightly with green oil, not PTed. I'be been getting fed up with the crap that has been showing up in brown lately. Cut it and it shows a brown stain just 3/32 into the wood. I think the mill is running them through a bath, not the heat/pressure/vacuum that the spec calls for. It's just shoddy work on the mill's part. But that doesn't mean the builder can't take minor compensatory action, like best practices.
Looking at the in-process work of that job and the one you posted a few years ago, I'd choose -your- crew to do -my- shop. It just looked more professional all the way through. Or am I wrong? ;)
-- While we have the gift of life, it seems to me that only tragedy is to allow part of us to die - whether it is our spirit, our creativity, or our glorious uniqueness. -- Gilda Radner
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On 11/6/2012 7:52 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Well actually PT does get in all the way if done properly and if you are buying the type rated for ground contact. I just helped my son replace a mailbox post, AKA PT fence post. It was in the ground in excess of 25 years with no extra treatment on the end when I put it in the ground originally. Dry rot 12" above ground at a dried out knot was the eventual failure point. We pulled the post out of the ground and the part that was in the ground was actually in almost new shape. I was quite surprised.

OK, consider this. I agree it did not look good but here is a very real possibility. The color may not be coming out true on your monitor or it may not have been video taped properly. Basically seeing it in person might reveal a color we do not see.
Next, my house has PT sills but if you cut one it will appear much greener in the outside than the inside. My sills were retreated with a pesticide that is green in color to deter termites. This may or may not explain what is going on in that video.
Seriously, why don't you contact him on the situation and ask about the details. See if he even noticed or paid attention.
I'be been

Well remember there is rated for ground contact PT and there is the other PT stuff.

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wrote:

"If, if, if" isn't that post in the video, is it? Nor is that ground contact rated. But I've cut into GCR posts and seen white centers, too, about 3 years ago.

Mills used to care! They also used a much better pesticide and mildewcide than we can now buy.

Yeah, that one green studlet just might have been a leftover from a termite-treated stud. That means the sillplate isn't PT.

I started this portion of the thread as a statment of notice. I noticed that the sill plate wasn't treated. What it turned into is a PITA. I'm done. You go ahead, if he hasn't noticed.

Ask the guys at the mill if their GCR PT is green/brown all the way through. I'll bet money they tell you "No, it isn't."
-- While we have the gift of life, it seems to me that only tragedy is to allow part of us to die - whether it is our spirit, our creativity, or our glorious uniqueness. -- Gilda Radner
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On 11/8/2012 8:38 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

I have already provided a couple of possible explanations of what you might be seeing.

I can still buy the good PT post today. Perhaps you can't where you live.

PT sill plates were not pretreated, they were sprayed after the fact.

You are apparently the only one that seems to think something is wrong.

All you have to do is look at the end of the board.
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wrote:

Maybe not.

LJ out.
-- While we have the gift of life, it seems to me that only tragedy is to allow part of us to die - whether it is our spirit, our creativity, or our glorious uniqueness. -- Gilda Radner
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