laminating cherry stock for a gun stock

I have some great cherry stock I want to make into a rifle stock. All boards are 3/4 stock cut to rough length. I need to know if anyone has a good technique for laminating stock this thick, I need to get a blank 3" thick. What amount of pressure is needed? Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't think any great amount of pressure is needed - it's more important to get all the boards as flat as possible (or cut into exactly complimentary hills/valleys, I suppose, but that'd probably be a lot harder than getting them all flat). Do you have a jointer? Or some hand planes and patience? If not, you might look into renting or borrowing time on someone else's jointer. If you bought the cherry at a real hardwood dealer, they might do it for you for a small fee. As far as laminating technique, you just get the boards flat, glue them together (any kind of glue will work, TBIII or epoxy would be best for water resistance), and clamp them. Use clamping cauls (DAGS) if you don't have enough clamps, or if you don't have clamps that reach deep enough. Good luck, Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mon, Jun 4, 2007, 1:39pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com doth query: I have some great cherry stock I want to make into a rifle stock. All boards are 3/4 stock cut to rough length. I need to know if anyone has a good technique for laminating stock this thick, I need to get a blank 3" thick. What amount of pressure is needed?
I've laminated 3/4" stock before, not cherry. Flat stock, planed, glue, clamp, no prob. Pressure? Dunno. If you're not sure, do it the usual way, try it on some scrap first.
JOAT What is life without challenge and a constant stream of new humiliations? - Peter Egan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As others have said, the amount of pressure is not a critical factor. In fact, too much might starve the joint. Even pressure and flat surfaces are the key elements. I've built several laminated stocks with fairly standard woodworking practices and had no problems.
1. Epoxy glue is a key. I haven't tried TB III as it wasn't around when I did this. I used good old Acra Glass from Brownells because I knew it from bedding actions and I trusted the stuff.
2. Watch the grain in the boards. Try to alternate up grain and down to reduce any twisting (a twisted gun stock is not a good thing if you want to hit what you aim at).
3. For a 4 board stack, glue 2 together as one stack, 2 together as another. Allow to cure, re flatten if needed and glue the 2 stacks together. I find it easier to get consistent pressure on the stack this way.
That stock, if the cherry is nicely figured and the glue-up is well done, is going to be awesome! Not sure game won't get spooked by the glow, but it'll sure look nice!
If you like, take a look at:
http://web2.airmail.net/xleanone/index.html/Gun%20Stock /
This isn't a laminated stock, just the one I did last.
BTW, some of the images have NOT been re-sampled to 72 DPI, so they're pretty big.
Regards.
Tom
On Mon, 04 Jun 2007 13:39:35 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That is a beauty!!
Good job.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not if he paints it a nice flat black!
:-)
Joe running for the bunker
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ROFL - could always use Minwax Dark Walnut stain on it instead!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tactical cherry!
10x wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.