key hole cutter. What is it for

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RicodJour wrote:

Wooden tray, of course. You trying to go OT on us? Joe
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On Thu, 23 Mar 2006 13:00:12 -0800, Gus wrote:

Yeah ... what he said. It aint the kids fault if his Mom used to hang out with Tim Leery.
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Well, (apparently) they come in different sizes. I have one that cuts very nice T-tracks. Quarter-inch hexhead bolts fit okay, but toilet bolts fit perfectly in the slot. The tolerance for a stand hex head is very sloppy, and it can "spin" in the slot. That said, lifting slightly on the tightening knob while tightening is the obvious solution.
I was initially worried about the wooden flanges breaking, until I considered the actually mechanics of a T-Track. Actually the bolt head and the tightening nut, clamp on both sides of the flanges, and usually, very little lateral pressure is actually exerted on the flanges. I've used it on a couple of different applications without any problems.
The length of the slotted track is infinitely variable, and there is not the problem of drilling and countersinking extra holes for the hold-down screws.
And there's several feet of blessedly expensive T-Track I haven't bought <Grin> And T-track can be hard to obtain outside some wood specialty shops.
The keyhole cutter method does offer some advantages over the extruded aluminum tracks. The depth of the cut is adjustable, for one. Installing the aluminum track usually necessitates a pretty precise depth for the router bit.
On the down side, I wouldn't attempt it in an unsurfaced piece of particle board, although I have used it with success in Formica surfaced particle board. I don't think an unlined keyhole slot is structurally as strong as the aluminum track, so I could see potential problem with certain hold-down clamps. (However, there is no problem with featherboards).
IF you rip out a keyhole cut T-slot, the whole tabletop or guide fence (whatever) would probably have to be replaced, where as with the aluminum slot, it could be moved slightly or new holds drilled and the slot could be re-attached.
Just some food for thought.
Oh, BTW, you can cut keyholes with them.
James...
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