Jessem Sliding Table - Question for additional use


I've been looking around for a sliding table for my TS. After doing some research I found the jessem 7500 would work best for me (mainly due to it's small foot print and crosscut capacity.)
In searching for best price I came across a flyer from Stan Houston Equipment Co, advertising this unit for 449.95 at a woodworkers show in SD. I called, and asked about the pricing and was very pleased that they would honor the price, and send UPS to NM. It arrived a few days later, I'm going to spend today installing my new toy. I've unpacked the table, and I'm impressed already. All looks well machined and nicely finished. I just wanted to say that I was very happy with this transaction from Stan Houston and think I got a great price.
Now for my question...I do a lot of shelving, mainly for display cases and libraries. The sliding table was purchased so that I can make quick work of cutting panels and shelving, accurately. Carcass design usually calls for rabbits and dados that I normally use a router and straight edge. Is anyone using their sliding table to perform these operation? What could go wrong with using the sliding table and TS fence for rabbit/dados?
thanks,
-nick
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Nick--
I have the same set-up you just bought having sold my large excalibur sliding table (loved it but it just took up way too much space in a tight shop) for the Jessem machine that's attached to my PM66.
Just finished cutting rabbits and dadoes for a set of16 bookcases I'm building. I find it far faster to cut the rabbits/dadoes using a dado head on a table saw than using the router method though I believe it's more a matter of preference than anything else. You can do good work with either method though I think you'll find it fastewr to set the tablesaw fence where you want it and get the exact result with every board.
Only thing that I think can go wrong are the usual tablesaw sorts of things--if the fence isn't correctly set you can get binding (which can lead to kick-back), if you lose your presence of mind when you're operating the saw, you can end up cutting more than just the lumber. If your fences aren't aligned correctly you'll end up with skewed dadoes/rabbits. I use a set of Forrest dado cutters which give me pretty smooth and clean cuts.
One thing that you might need to do depending on the width of the boards you're cuitting and where you mount the Jessem fence is place the stop that Jessem builds into the table in a different position than the factory setting--this isn't a problem when youre doing straight cuts with a standard sawblade but when you have a dado head mounted, you might end up with the board not going far enough past the dado head to get the full depth in the dado.
all best,
jw
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Thanks JW.
I needed to remove my table board and fence, thought it be a good time to tune-up the saw. This went really well and I'm very pleased. I adjusted the blade so that it is now parallel with the edge of the table top, and got this to within 1/1000", a first for me.
I installed the slider, and was really careful with it's adjustments. Reinstalled the table board and fence, and paid close attention to adjusting the fence, and made sure it's parallel to the edge of the table top. Now fence (front to back) is within 1/1000" (what a day I had) although the middle seems to be a bit concave, about 3/1000", don't think this really matters.
Anyway, I cross cut some 12" pine, dead square. I next tried a few scarps of 30" ply, boom! right on the money. This is a really nice addition.
I'm going to try my dado head next (I have the freud.) I would prefer to use the TS for this as it would be quicker to setup then the router. I've got to cut and mill material for 8 cases. I understand your comments about the stops and will pay attention to this.
thanks again for your reply.
-nick

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Nick--
Sounds like you had a really decent set-up day and that thinks are working well for you. Glad to hear it.
I have a Freud dado head that I use as a back-up and it works just fine though the Forrest is a little cleaner on the plywood sheets I use (mostly Maple, Cherry, and Oak faced panels). BTW I'm not pushing the Forrest just had a few extra bucks a couple years ago and picked up a set at a decent price but used the Freud for a couple years prior.
Anyway, one further thought on the width issue with the dadoes--you could also do what I sometimes do and just place a squared up piece of one inch stock against the fence as a spacer--your panel should then clear the dado head just fine.
all best,
jw
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I spent yesterday cutting and milling plywood. The sliding table has really proven its worth. This is now in the category of "how did I get along without it."
I planned on the day just milling, but got to do most of the assembly as well. The setup was well worth the time. I bought a dial micrometer last year, and this really helped achieve good results.
My cabinets are 15 1/4 wide, used the middle position of the slider. I also ordered some t-bolts, so that I can build some hold downs.
The dado head worked well, and very clean across the grain.
Thanks for your feedback and tips JW.
-nick
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