I need a stragety for getting Jointer (Rockwell 37-315) knife Nuts Loose

I posted yesterday about where to get new knives for the Rockwell jointer 37-315 that I am restoreing. Thanks to all who pushed me in the right direction. As experinced woodworkers might have geussed that before the knives can be replaced you need to get them off the cutter head. That is easier said than done. I need help un-freezing the nuts that hold the knives in place. As soon as I came to a stuck nut I stopped in fear that I would strip them.
Thanks again to the people that have been helping me out through out this process.
Dan Murray
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which way are you trying to turn them??
David
Dan Murray wrote:

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I loosened several easily by pulling the 8mm wrench towards me as I stood on the operator side of the Jointer. I stopped when some nuts froze.
Dan
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On 30 Jul 2004 00:44:24 -0700, db snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Dan Murray) wrote:

The thing that helped me the most was to take a large hammer to the side of the thickest 8mm wrench I could find that would still fit in the slot in the planer head. Whacking the side on an anvil closed up the wrench until it was a very tight fit on the nut. That let me but more torque on the nut without fear of rounding it.
Regards, Ed
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Dan wrote:>>I loosened several easily by pulling the 8mm wrench towards me as I

Then I believe you're turning the bolt the wrong way. Tom Work at your leisure!
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Start by soaking them over night(ish) in Marvel Oil.
UA100
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"Unisaw A100" writes:

If that doesn't work, Kroil from Kano Labs.
They are on the web.
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
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PB Blaster from any parts store and many Home Centers. Soak it all night for the first try.
A jointer head is a really bad place to screw up...
Dan Murray wrote:

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I've had good luck over the years with liquid wrench. Tapping the head with a punch and hammer (lightly) sometimes helps. Last resort - you might try heat (torch)
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If you do opt for the torch, try dripping candle wax around them. It saved my butt when working on the axle of a tractor once. It really works too!

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If you try to apply heat to the bolt head it will work to expand the bolt and cause it to freeze even more. You want to heat up the area around the bolt but not the bolt itself. Sometimes that is easier said than done. I would go for the lubricants first. But be aware that if you do use them you should not put a flame anywhere near them later on.
I would use a six-point socket on the bolt rather than a wrench. You can add a breaker bar and apply tremendous torque if you need to. Be sure you rap the bolthead with a hammer several times after applying your lubricant.
Gary wrote:

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And how, exactly, do you get a six-point socket over the jackscrews?
scott
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Scott Lurndal wrote:

B..bbbb...but, he is the DIYGUY!
UA100
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