Need Info On Rockwell Jointer 37-290

My son was given the Rockwell 37-290 jointer and associated parts shown in these images:
http://i.imgur.com/DZu9H61.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/fK8KLoI.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/B59EwIE.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/ZznGXQA.jpg
Obvious issues:
The table and fence are pretty rusty. Are they salvageable and if so, what's the best method to restore them?
That's not the original motor so I don't know if that's the right pulley to obtain the correct speed. How would he determine that?
There's no shelf for the motor nor did he get a belt. That's something he can DIY, I guess.
Any other thoughts would certainly be welcome.
Just FYI, we found a free manual at the link below as well as copies for sale on eBay:
http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/698/2201.pdf
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On Monday, July 31, 2017 at 10:44:46 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:
It's more important that the tables are flat (not warped) and coplanar. I would doubt those small of tables are warped.

t's the best method to restore them?
Sand them - 80 grit if bad rust, otherwise 100 grit, then 220 grit, then wa x them. A little pitting, if there's some, won't hurt anything.

At what speed does that cutter head require? I didn't see any reference t o the cutter head speed in the manual. That motor is 3450 rpms. Equal siz e pulleys would result in about 3450 rpms of the cutter head, if the cutter head is about the same diameter as the pulley.
Karl posted a link to pulley calculations, etc. I printed it. I'll try t o find the link. The motor's pulley should have the same "V" shape as the cutter head's pulley. The pulley on that motor looks flat-bottomed. Whe n you go buy a belt, take a pulley with you, so that the belt mates with th e pulley, properly. The belt store folks should know what's best.... just double check your measurement for the belt length.... again, outside/outer edge measurement.

Build a shelf for mounting the motor. Your motor mount should have some so rt of adjustable mounting. When you're ready for a belt, measure for the b elt length along the outside edges (outer most diameter) of the pulleys. I think most belt lengths come in increments of 1". Your motor mount needs to be adjustable (slotted(?), where the bolts go), a little, if your belt is a tad too long or short.

Put (epoxy?) some rubber feet on the legs, to cut down on vibration noise, from the tool. Something like thickish (3/16", 1/4", maybe more) dense r ubber pads (soles from old sneakers or rubber boots?). 1/8" is too thin.

sale

Sonny
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On 7/31/2017 10:44 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

If nothing else, he got a darn good motor.
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On 07/31/2017 10:44 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

That's not bad at all, really...it's just some surface rust. For the large flat tables I just use the 5" ROS with 100 grit and some WD40 or kerosene for the first step--goes much faster than hand.

Compute RPM from diameter ratio--the nominal RPM will be about 4000 rpm I'd guess, but it'll be in the manual.

...
Generally they hung on a rod with a pivot for tensioning--just a flat plate or two angles with ubolt to go around a cross bar will be fine. Make a way to have a push or pull rod to lock in place depending on what's close and convenient on the stand.
--


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Top pulley should be 2.75", bottom 6.5" - according to this fellah:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R9rmvEEDx3k

https://www.harborfreight.com/vibration-free-link-belt-43771.html
http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/detail.aspx?id !509 http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/detail.aspx?id 386
http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/images/7953-E.jpg
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On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 10:14:01 AM UTC-5, Spalted Walt wrote:

But he didn't say what RPMs that motor was running. For his 6.5" motor pu lley, I'll bet the motor RPMs was 1725. Derby's motor is 3450 RPMs. A 6.5" motor pulley, for Derby, may be too big.
Seems that guy's belt was too loose, also. Seemed like lots of slop on th e left side.... and that slop wouldn't be caused by pulley run-out, he ment ions/demonstrates. His belt is loose, IMO. The guy seems to know what he 's doing and talking about, so maybe I'm missing something, as well.
Sonny
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Yup, I believe you're right: http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/detail.aspx?id1710
http://www.vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/images/31710-D.jpg
So, by plugging in the appropriate values here: https://www.blocklayer.com/pulley-belteng.aspx
Large Pulley 6 1/2" Small Pulley 2 3/4" Pulley Centers 20" (value doesn't matter) RPM Large 1725
Clicking 'Calculate' results in Small Pulley RPM = 4077
So a 3450 RPM motor needs a 3 1/4" pulley to achive the same 4077 RPM on the smaller 2 3/4" pulley (cutter head)

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On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 5:32:04 PM UTC-4, Spalted Walt wrote:

The current pulley looks to be about that size, right? My son got the machine from his GF's father who had it in a warehouse. The origin is apparently unknown, but the Dad said that one of his employees took it apart. That's leads me to believe that is was up and running with that motor at some point. I know that doesn't mean that the cutter heads were operating at the right speed, but maybe the previous owner did the same calculations as you. I'll pass the info on to him.
Thanks!
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On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 4:59:54 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Pass that calculator to him, also. It'll calculate the belt length, as well.
Sonny
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