Slightly off topic Florescent lights.

I am posting this to the woodworking group because wood workers know a lot about everything. ;-)
I am a volunteer at church and one of things that I do is change the florescent lights when they die. Most of the fixtures are four tube fixtures.
Is there a test to tell if a Florescent light tube is bad and needs to be replaced, or the light is not working because its companion is dead?
I have struggled with this. Sometimes when one of the tubes is replaced the other seems to start working. So it would be nice to test the tube to see if even though working it should be replaced.
--
2017: The year we lean to play the great game of Euchre

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If you have enough bulbs to check to justify a $120 investment...
(Amazon.com product link shortened)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxTMF8mAXVo


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQ4nQgiaYK4

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Keith Nuttle wrote:

In the hospital where I used to work, if a bulb in a fixture went out they replaced all 4 bulbs. Since they always did that, when one went out all the others were the same age and likely to go before long. Apparently this practice was cost effective for them. But then, their maintenance crew was being paid.
I always replace just the bad one. In fact, did that today.
--
GW Ross








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"G Ross" wrote in message
Keith Nuttle wrote:

In the hospital where I used to work, if a bulb in a fixture went out they replaced all 4 bulbs. Since they always did that, when one went out all the others were the same age and likely to go before long. Apparently this practice was cost effective for them. But then, their maintenance crew was being paid.
I always replace just the bad one. In fact, did that today.
***************
I have a bunch of 8' cans hanging from chains in my shop. They hold two tubes. When I notice one acting flakey I just replace both of them. Some of my 8 footers are 10 years old, and I have yet to replace a ballast. All of the cans are ten years old.
When I was a kid one of my chores was replacing the tubes in the 4' cans above the drop ceiling in our family grocery store. I also had to replace a number of ballasts over the years. One day I asked my dad if he thought the bulbs being bad were affecting the ballasts. He made a couple phone calls and said lets try just replacing all the bulbs on a can the instant one starts acting up and see. I replaced one or two ballasts over the next year, and then not another one until the day I left home.
I don't know how many ballasts my dad replaced after I left home, but...
A few years ago my dad stated with authority that if a tube starts acting you should just replace all the tubes on the can as your ballasts will last longer if you do. I'm not sure if he remembers our conversation from over 35 years ago, but I do.
I've never heard or read an "authority" state that to be the case, but I pretty much believe it. Given what a ballast costs I think its cheaper to just replace all the tubes the instant one tube starts to flicker or act flakey. For somebody who might need to hire an electrician the cost of a bad ballast is much more.
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"Cans" is not the appropiate term. Fixture is. Recessed fluorescent fixtures are generally known as troffers.
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On 7/31/2017 2:50 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

IIRC the can, is the can "in" the ceiling.
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"Scott Lurndal" wrote in message writes:

"Cans" is not the appropiate term. Fixture is. Recessed fluorescent fixtures are generally known as troffers.
***********
Not sure "can" is a proper term regardless. I've been calling any flimsy sheet metal light fixture a "can" for atleast 40 years. Probably not going to change anytime soon. My particular improper term "can" is intended to be derogatory of its flimsy sheet metal nature.
I do have a box of light "cans" that are left over from the recessed lighting I installed in my machine room. I don't think it says "can" anywhere on the box either.
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wrote:

Recessed lights are commonly called "cans" or "can lights" because, well, they look like cans.
<http://www.homedepot.com/s/can+light?NCNI-5> ^^^^^^^^^
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On 8/4/2017 10:02 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

I think most any recessed electrical box is called a can. When our new house was built the building plans called for a "can" to be inset in the closet wall to house the structured wiring. Alarm wiring, Ethernet wiring, etc, By its shape you would thing it would be called a "box". ;~)
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I've never heard of a "J-box" called a "can". I haven't seen a J-box surface mounted on a finished surface, either (i.e. opposed to being recessed).
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On 8/5/2017 11:19 AM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

Now you have. ;~) Wright or wrong, that is what the builder and installer called it.
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On 7/31/2017 2:34 PM, Bob La Londe wrote:

I was once told be a lighting salesman that the failing tubes can cause a ballast to go bad. Cheaper to replace all tubes, maybe. I have 4 tube fixtures and the ballasts cost $12. If the lamps poops out shortly after turning dark it is probably less expensive to replace the tubes at first sign, but I have seen dark ends on some tubes for months with nothing really going wrong.
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On Monday, July 31, 2017 at 12:59:50 PM UTC-7, Leon wrote:

Replacing all tubes, if it's at all difficult to reach the fixture, is certainly a good idea (won't save much money trying to get the last ten percent of life out of a tube that's turning dark). The 'cause a ballast to go bad' is probably obsolete, the old iron ballasts would sometimes overheat when a tube went out.
The reason, is that the tube going out could result in accidental rectification of the current (and magnetize/saturate/overheat the ballast).
New (electronic) ballasts don't do that.
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On 7/31/2017 3:53 PM, whit3rd wrote:

BELL LAB PROVES EXISTENCE OF DARK SUCKERS! For years it has been believed that electric bulbs emitted light. However, recent information from Bell Labs has proven otherwise. Electric bulbs don't emit light; they suck dark. Thus they now call these bulbs dark suckers. The dark sucker theory, according to a spokesman from the Labs, proves the existence of dark, that dark has mass heavier than that of light, and that dark is faster than light.
The basis of the dark sucker theory is that electric bulbs suck dark. Take for example the dark suckers in the room where you are. There is less dark right next to them than there is elsewhere. The larger the dark sucker, the greater its capacity to suck dark. Dark suckers in a parking lot have a much greater capacity than the ones in this room.
As with all things, dark suckers don't last forever. Once they are full of dark, they can no longer suck. This is proven by the black spot on a full dark sucker. A new candle has a white wick. You will notice that after the first use, the wick turns black, representing all the dark which has been sucked into it. If you hold a pencil next to the wick of an operating candle, the tip will turn black because it got in the path of the dark flowing into the candle. Unfortunately, these primitive dark suckers have a very limited range.
There are also portable dark suckers. The bulbs in these can't handle all of the dark by themselves, and must be aided by a dark storage unit. When the dark storage unit is full, it must be either emptied or replaced before the portable dark sucker can operate again.
Dark has mass. When dark goes into a dark sucker, friction from this mass generates heat. Thus it is not wise to touch an operating dark sucker. Candles present a special problem, as the dark must travel in the solid wick instead of through glass. This generates a great amount of heat. Thus it can be very dangerous to touch an operating candle.
Dark is also heavier than light. If you swim deeper and deeper, you notice it gets darker and darker. When you reach a depth of approximately fifty feet, you are in total darkness. This is because the heavier dark sinks to the bottom of the lake and the ligher light floats to the top.
The immense power of dark can be utilized to a man's advantage. We can collect the dark that has settled to the bottom of lakes and push it through turbines, which generates electricity and helps push it to the ocean where it may be safely stored. Prior to turbines, it was much more difficult to get dark from rivers and lakes to the ocean. The Indians recognized this problem and tried to solve it. When on a river in a canoe traveling in the same direction as the flow of dark, they paddled slowly, so as not to stop the flow of dark, but when they traveled against the flow of dark, they paddled quickly so as to help push the dark along its way.
Finally, we must prove that dark is faster than light. If you stand in an illuminated room in front of a closed, dark closet, then slowly open the door, you would see the light slowly enter the closet, but since the dark is so fast, you would not be able to see the dark leave the closet.
In conclusion, Bell Labs stated that dark suckers make all our lives much easier. So the next time you look at an electric light bulb, remember that it is indeed a dark sucker.
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This is old news and they are called Dark Absorbers.

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wrote:

The solid state versions are known as Dark Emitting Axial Diodes.

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On 7/31/2017 3:34 PM, Bob La Londe wrote:

Don't use Phillips bulbs!!! POS. I just replaced a sylvania that was years, old, and a phillips that was months old. They were in troffers in the basement, 2 adjacent troffers.
I've got to find Sylvnia, or GE bulbs. I won't do another case of Phillips. All the crappy Phillips died in months, I had 2 cases fail in a relatively short time. A total waste of money.
--
Jeff

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wrote:

All the current production stuff seams to be crap.
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On 8/1/2017 4:50 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Agreed, at least the ones you find at the big boxes.
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I get exacvtly the same crap from my electrical supply houses. Might have different brand names, but "same shit, different pile" applies.
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