Hurricane lumber?

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called
Uhh, no if I was thinking of spalted lumber, I would have said that. http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Cutting_shake_out_of_logs.html
Using your logic, we can assume that baby oil made out of babies.
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On Wed, 24 Sep 2003 21:24:39 GMT, "Norm Underwood"
No one knows what causes shake. There are probably several causes. Drought stress will do it to oaks, and sandy soils make it likely anyway.
There is one view that bacterial or fungal damage is implicated. But (unlike that website implies) it happens in the cambium while the tree is young. It's definitely not caused by some bizarre attack in an adult tree, that chooses to preferentially attack just one ring, deep within the butt.

Only the good stuff. The cheap brands are cut with puppy fat.
-- Smert' spamionam
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On Thu, 25 Sep 2003 00:23:55 +0100, Andy Dingley
DFTFT.

<g>
-- Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life. ---- --Unknown
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wrote:

DFTTP
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Norm Underwood spaketh...


I suggest you read your own citations before posting them.
"Of course, if the wood has been in a tornado, it might develop shake without a bacterial presence. -Gene Wengert, forum technical advisor, woodweb.com
We were discussing trees knocked down by a hurricane, not a stretch of the imagination that they may have wind shake.
Shake is the condition, wind is a cause; disease can weaken the tree and may cause the shake or more likely increase the likelyhood of shake, but it is not the only cause.
--
McQualude

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Regarding wind shake, Most of the big oaks knocked over by Isabel were pulled up by the roots due to our very wet conditions for the last 3-4 months. Some may have "wind shake", but I don't think these trees were "shaken" that much by Isabel. I guess you would just have to cut some to see.
Montyhp.

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will
and
but
Now go to http://www.weather.com and look up the difference between a tornado and a hurricane. Most trees from Isabel were uprooted by straight line winds. Tornados are cyclonic winds which twist the trees and don't uproot them but snap them in half. Therefore, it's not likely that the trees will have any more internal stress than they did before the hurricane knocked them over.
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Half my ass. Tornados turn trees into woodchips.
--

FF

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a
trees
Think F1, not F5
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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net (Fred the Red Shirt) wrote in message

Some chip, some snap. I've seen my share in NC. Once I saw one close up, eating a trailer park for breakfast (no joke, in Hillsborough). The trees around it were mostly pine and they were all snapped about halfway up. Place looked like Godzilla had a tantrum there. The few hardwood on that acre or so fell too: their trunks intact but many branches snapped off. The only chips were from the snapping or when the trees fell onto one another. But having seen the power I don't doubt that under the right conditions a tornado could make for a fine chipper.
H.
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snipped-for-privacy@sewanee.edu (Hylourgos) wrote in message

I didn't see the tornado itself, but I saw the 50 yd wide swath it cut through the woods. Looked like a giant brushhog had weaved its way through. Here and there a tree trunk was still attached to the stump, but twisted and shattered.
--

FF

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Considering the jolt a tree trunk gets when the tree is felled it seems unlikely that wind shake is caused by wind shaking the tree.
I would suppose that the term 'wind shake' dates back a couple of hundred years at least, maybe even to a time before bacteria had been discovered. So, if a modern source indicates that wind shake is caused by a bacterial infection of the cambriam, I'm happy to accept that.
You could try shaking a piece of wood until it breaks. I bet it'll crack accross the grain befor is splits with the grain-- unless it is a short-grained board like curly wood.
--

FF

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Fred the Red Shirt spaketh...


Fred, as far as any information on wind shake I can find, shake is the condition (like warp, twist, cup, check etc). Check is wood separation across the growth rings, shake is seperation parallel to the rings. AFAIK, it isn't called wind shake because of the wind shaking the tree, but because the 'shake' is caused by the wind. Shake is also caused by disease.
It would be easy to assume that the condition 'shake' is named because people believed the wind caused it, but I don't believe that is true. Shake also happens in rock and I'm pretty sure it isn't caused by wind, but by frost or geophysical stress. Here are two definitions of shake:
shake: (noun) A fissure in rock. A crack in timber caused by wind or frost.
I've can only say it so many ways: it isn't called 'wind shake' because the wind shakes the tree, it is called wind shake because 'wind' causes the 'shake'. I suppose shake caused by frost could be called 'frost shake' or if caused by bacteria 'germ shake'.
--
McQualude

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snipped-for-privacy@cavtel.net (EricY) wrote in message

I have an Alaskan chainsaw mill (32" bar on Stihl 066) and will split the wood with you if you push the saw :)
I've got 5 white oaks and a maple to cut up on my property, but there's always room for a little bit more! Send me an e-mail if you're interested...
Chris
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Go rent a flat bed with a crane and then go to the landfill. They would probably be glad to get rid of them.

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snipped-for-privacy@cavtel.net (EricY) wrote in message

Eric,
If you see it in front of a person's house, go up and knock on the door and ask if you can go through their lumber pile. Some will say no, some will say yes. I've gotten some nice dogwood that way here in Raleigh, NC.
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This is our house after hurricane Erin paid a visit:
http://www.2manytoyz.com/temp/tree1.jpg
http://www.2manytoyz.com/temp/tree2.jpg
The first picture is a huge china berry tree, the second a full sized maple. I'd gladly let anyone willing have any/all of either one. Both trees were a complete write off. The china berry took weeks of slicing to finally get it removed. I now have a renewed respect for something as little as a category 1 hurricane.
I can understand the county's position as far a liability. Some idiot gets hurt, then sues them.

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