Home Depot - what a bunch of maroons

Page 5 of 6  


Maybe we need federal regulation on the price of the toilet paper and power drills?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 06 Dec 2006 17:10:17 -0500, Locutus wrote:

Or maybe we just need to break up Wal-Mart.
--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Maybe you just need to grow up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 07 Dec 2006 18:46:00 +0000, Brian Henderson wrote:

Insulted me twice for that one. I must be doing someting right.
--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

So much for having me plonked, huh?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Better service is certainly one way that small operations can compete with the big box stores. Some small businesses understand that, some don't -- and it's the latter, IME, that can't survive competition with the big boxes.

Nonsense -- the Sherman Antitrust Act bans ANTIcompetitive business practices. It was passed specifically to put an end to businesses conspiring to stifle competition.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
: Better service is certainly one way that small operations can compete with the : big box stores. Some small businesses understand that, some don't -- and it's : the latter, IME, that can't survive competition with the big boxes.
Here's a couple of articles that I found interesting:
http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/77/walmart.html
http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/102/open_snapper.html
The first is the story of what happened to Vlasic pickles (company went bankrupt after getting a close relationship with Walmart), and the second is about one company that decided not to sell through Walmart, and why.
I agree that ultimately it's the customer that decided whether a business gets his money or not, but there are other factors at work, including ignorance on the part of the customer (to take a group relevant example, tools with plastic innards instead of metal ones have advantages and disadvantages, and the typical homeowner doesn't know about them), and Walmart's ability, due to its sher size, to pressure suppliers to reduce costs.
    -- Andy Barss
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The first article is about about Vlasic selling a gallon jar of pickles at Walmart for $3. Vlasic made less profit on these and wanted to raise the price, but Walmart said no. (They eventually switched to 1/2 gallon jars.)
The same article also says that Vlasic's bankruptcy was not caused by selling the gallon jars of pickles.
The article does not specifically blame Walmart for the bankruptcy.
Brian Elfert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

No, says the person with the grip on reality. Do try to keep up.

Funny, plenty of places find ways to differentiate themselves, mostly by offering superior customer service, etc. that Walmart and similar stores do not offer. How do you think Walmart got to be the 800-lb gorilla they are today? They started out as a small business and grew because they were successful.
You people seem to have a problem with success.

And when Walmart gets to be a monopoly, you be sure to let us know. Otherwise, keep your annoying liberal whining to yourself.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 07 Dec 2006 18:45:39 +0000, Brian Henderson wrote:

<plonk>
--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You're kind of slow aren't you? The problem isn't with success, it's when that success becomes so all-encompassing that it effectively obliterates any chance of other little start-ups from becoming successful. Or, when that success makes it more difficult than it should be for little start-ups from having any real chance of success.
It's the multitude of little start-ups that determines the success of any industry, not the one or two gargantuan businesses that blanket the entire industry.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Funny, there are all kinds of other successful businesses out there, Walmart certainly hasn't harmed them in the least. Heck, locally there are small businesses in the SAME SHOPPING CENTER AS WALMART that are doing just fine and carry many of the same products that Walmart carries.
See, here's a news flash for you. When you start a business, there is no guarantee that you're going to succeed. In fact, statistically, the majority of small businesses fail within the first two years and that has nothing to do with Walmart, it has to do with the nature of small business and economics.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike 'Flyin'8' wrote:

Bixby is a suburb of Tulsa. It looks like Home Depot still has eight stores in the Tulsa area.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm not sure that means anything. In the Chicago suburban area, going to a store in a nearby suburb can easily be a half hour drive. Gurnee is a suburb of Chicago. But it's also about 40 miles north.
And Wal Marts have closed after just a few years when they felt the store volume wasn't sufficient. Unfortunately the small businesses that closed don't generally come right back.
Nova wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I love how almost any topic concerning HD or Walmart turns into a flame war....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 7 Dec 2006 15:14:18 -0500, "Locutus"

It's because you've got the people on one side with facts and logic, facing off against the anti-Walmart whiners on the other who can't think, only react emotionally.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I bought a Porter Cable belt sander at Home Depot last year and the stupid damn store didn't have and Porter Cable belts. I had to buy the 3M belts they carried. Really pissed me off.Porter Cable sander -Poorter Cable belts. 3M sander - 3M belts. Klingspoor sander - Klingspoor belts. That's the way it should be.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can't be serious. Would you extend this to drill bits, router bits, saw blades and all other expendable materials and accessories?
Personally, I would much prefer having tools that use standard expendables. That way, I can shop for the best deal in terms of quality and cost.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why not? Only way you can be sure the drill bits match properly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Yep. That's why you need a Campbell's can opener to open your Campbell's soup cans, a generic can opener just won't do the job right.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.