Gripper?

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Has anyone used a Gripper on a table saw? Opinions? Peachtree has them for $42 (regularly $70). If they work, it's a pretty good deal.
They also have a good deal on "Board Mates" (a "Board Buddy" rip-off, I suppose).
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It works, but you really need TWO for long stock. See their web site:
http://www.microjig.com /
I like it for cutting small stock.
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I bought the 2 fer package at a ww show several years back. I am not sure why I waited so long. You can build the equivalent but not so elegantly and they never seem to loose their grip.
They absolutely work. And if you cut thin stock there is 1/8" accesory piece that you can switch out for one of the 1/4" sides.
And, they can be repaired if you damage them.
Some assembly required.
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Is there a place where they demonstrate the use of them better? I was unable to see the advantages of using one.
From what I saw, it is just a push block with rubber on the bottom. I gather there is more to it than that.
--
Jim in NC



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wrote

Go the manufacutrer web site there are videos. It is just a push block but configurable and quickly adjusted.
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On 8/13/2010 10:13 PM, Morgans wrote:

There is--gaps and adjustability. I got one a while back and am thinking about getting a second.
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Most of the push blocks I have I push to the side, or push forward. With the Gr-r-ripper, I can push straight down, and feel very comfortable doing this.
Yes, I could make lots of push blocks with slits and holes, but it's easy to just shift the middle pieces to the left or right to match the cut I am doing.
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On Fri, 13 Aug 2010 18:25:10 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Bought a couple because of swingman. Definitely worth the cost to have two of them.
Mike M
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On Aug 13, 7:25pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Check eBay - they have a package deal going.
R
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On 8/13/2010 6:25 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

You probably won't want to take the advice of a "maroon", but I'll chime in anyway. They *absolutely* work and are _worth_every_penny_, especially at that price. As others have said GET TWO; you won't be sorry. And be sure the model you get has the "balance support" attachment; that's one of the handiest damn things I've ever used (I think that attachment comes with the base model, but I'd check to be sure).
--
See Nad. See Nad go. Go Nad!
To reply, eat the taco.
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On Fri, 13 Aug 2010 21:39:21 -0500, Steve Turner

I guess I'll have to do some more research to see exactly what this package is. It's billed as the "Gripper 200 Advanced Model". Perhaps I'll order a couple (after checking eBay, too). Thanks, all!
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wrote:

One last thing here, these things are meant to be sacrificial. As I mentioned earlier you buy and replace most any part.
That said there is a DVD that came with mine and is a very interesting video. IIRC it is 30-45 minutes and shows all the different applications. One that interested me in particular was the woodworker that cuts narrow veneer on his TS and uses the Gripper to act as a top side zero clearance insert. The slick smooth side of the gripper will ride along the side of your rip fence quite well. The gentleman use the gripper against the fence to insure that cut after cut the blade followed the same path through the gripper pad when cutting thin strops of veneer. Very interesting and effective.
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UK, I poked around until I found some videos of the thing in use in enough detail to see how they work.
I have a couple comments.
They sell themselves hard on fuctionality, and I will admit that it looks like they do some pretty neat things. It looks like you would spend all your time setting up the push stick. Not for me, in most cases, I think. I know how to use a saw and different techniques without all the fuss.
Second point is that I will never be able to use them in my school woodworking shop setting. I have to use a factory, OSHA approved guard. Period. The gripper will in no way solve that problem.
Another comment is that the blade is still going to be left unguarded before and after the cut. In the two semi-serious shop table saw accidents I have been around (one was me at the very beginning of my woodworking, long long ago- the other was a student in my shop class) the accident would likely still have happened, because the problem took place after the cut.
--
Jim in NC




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On 8/14/2010 7:41 PM, Morgans wrote:

Depends on what you're doing. If you've got a production job to run then a few minutes setup time can cut the recurring way down.

In a school setting where you _must_ use an OSHA approved guard how do you teach how to use jigs and fixtures that won't work with the guard, or do you just not do that?

The only thing that will prevent accidents "after the cut" is a Sawstop and it won't prevent all of them.
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No doubt on that account. If I have to do more that 6 or so parts, or they have to be to a very high degree of identical precision, I am first to jig up somehow. I take pride in that fact.

I design jigs and fixtures that will work with OSHA approved guards, 98 percent of the time. Occasionally I switch out the splitter/ overhead plastic blade guard to a suspended guard for the cuts that do not penetrate all of the way through. I have a 12" 5 HP saw that will go through in one cut most of the time, unless it is a cut that is not supposed to go all of the way through.
Many (most) cuts that are not rip type operations using the rip fence are done on the radial arm saws, or power miter saws, or something else. That eliminates many types of operations that are difficult to perform/jig on the table saw. I have another table saw that lives with a dado blade (most of the time) and a suspended guard. That also helps it to be practical to use OSHA guards on the primary table saw.
My remaining 2 percent operations I do use with homemade guards and jigs, but the blade is never left unguarded for an operation that the students will be performing at any time-before during or after the cut. If there is something that has to be done for a quick operation that is not practical or possible to guard, I make it as safe as possible, and perform the cut myself. I do emphasise that I still demonstrate a safe operation, and use imaginative solutions in making it possible to fully guard the blade. Even though it may not be a commercially produced guard, it still will meet the spirit of the OSHA regulation.
Does all of this slow down operations in the shop? Believe it or not, I think only slightly. I have gotten so used to using all of the guards as they are and using guards and proceedures that I have developed, I have a supply of jigs and guards that make extra setup and use time pretty minimal.

From my viewing of the Sawstop machine, I disagree. Other than a nick that does not require more than a band-aid, or a broken Sawstop machine, that is the best sure-fire prevention of serious injury I have ever seen. I wish it was available in a 12 inch blade, and a higher HP motor, and did not cost several arms and legs to purchase. ;-)
--
Jim in NC



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On 8/15/2010 12:40 AM, Morgans wrote:

Won't stop thrown-object injuries, just hand-in-blade injuries.
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I can assure you from personal experience that if you can afford several arms and legs to buy a SawStop that the first time it performs it's safety function it has many times over more than paid for itself condisering medical costs, loss of personal function, and or personal liability if some one else is injured.
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"Morgans" wrote:

-------------------------------------- Interesting.
The community college course I just completed limited had a very explicit use of a radial arm saw which was at least a 12" beast.
The ONLY approved use of a RAS was to cut rough lumber to approximate length.
When asked why, the instructor said, Sears & Roebuck oversold the (safe) capabilities of the RAS many years ago.
Want an argument?
Change the subject.
Lew
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On 8/16/2010 1:20 AM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Seems to be a religion for some people. For me the RAS has never been as scary as the table saw. I'm happy to have both--gives me options, and if I have one set up for an operation I can use the other one for other work.
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The only thing I will not do in a shop is rip with a radial arm saw.
THAT should be outlawed, IMHO. A board with some internal grain stress can cause a bad situation if it is ripped on a RAS.
--
Jim in NC



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