Freud LU84 blades - any good?


Hi Y'all, I'm thinking of replacing almost all my TS blades (mostly Craftman non-carbide) with the Freud LU84 combination blade. Do any of you use this blade? If so, comments? TIA Joe_Stein
P.S. Woodworkers Supply has these for $60 ea. Anybody seen them cheaper anywhere?
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wrote:

I've been using Freud blades for years. I've had LU72s, LU84s, LU85s, and they've all worked well. I particularly like the Ultimate Chop Saw Blade (is that the 85 or the 72? I get 'em all mixed up). Glass smooth cuts. I don't know how you can improve on that.
Although Forrest prices have come down some in years, it used to be they were about twice as much as a Freud. They aren't twice as good. Frankly, I don't even know that they're better. You'll hear lot's of Forrest owners brag about how good their blade is, but I don't think I've ever heard a former Frued owner claim their Forest was a LOT (or any) better than the Freud.
I think you get great value with Freud blades.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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Hi Joe,
I am a Freud/Forrest user. It took me quite a while (years) to work up the $ to spring a C-note for a Forrest WWII. I have used Freud blades for several years - and they are quite good - have four of them at around $75ea on average.
The WWII will do anything that these Freuds will do - and just as well. I'm talking laminate/combo/finecut or whatever. I wish that I had purchased the Forrest 5 years ago. Would have saved me some $.
Also just bought the Forrest 'chopmaster' for my MS - SWMBO was a little alarmed last week when I used it for the first time on some oak crown. "Sounds different" she said. Yeah - that's my new Forrest (in response). Oh - be careful then - sounds sharp !??
The Forrest's are scary sharp to start and just bring the 'jaded' hobbyist to slight 'attention' when they reach full RPM.
You will know what I'm talking about when/if you get one.
I will not buy another blade other than a Forrest.
FWIW.
Lou
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With a Forrest you know you have the absolute best. Any trouble is not the blade, it is your technique or your machine. Eliminating one variable is always a good thing.
Also the carbide is thicker than other blades, meaning more resharpenings, and the coatings on the frued are usually removed the first time they are sharpened.
Alan
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snipped-for-privacy@peoplepc.com says...

I've had one for years. Works fine. I also have a Freud thin kerf finish blade and a rip (framing) blade I use them when I want the best cut I can get, but I use the combo blade 90% of the time.
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BNSF = Build Now, Seep Forever

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I've used it -- it's a compromise between quality and laziness -- I just hate changing the frigging blade.
When ripping, it tends to burn a little more than a dedicated (e.g. glue-line) rip blade. When cross-cutting, you get a little tear out. It's no good for any kind of non-thru cut, because it's a TCG tooth, and you have to clean up the artifacts it leaves behind.
It's like car tires. "All Season" is really "No Season" :-) The saw blade itself should be treated like an individual tool, not like a disposable razor (that helps justify the cost in my mind :-)
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