Finishing outdoor furniture

Hi all, I'm new to the forum. Very nice, so little spam and flaming.
I have a question about finishing outdoor furniture. I'm planning to build a sofa, chair and coffee table out of either teak or Honduran mahogany (if someone has another good suggestion, I'm open.) I don't want the wood to weather to grey but rather maintain the natural color of the wood. I realize yearly maintenance will be required. I was thinking exterior grade polyurethane. Can anyone give me some suggestions as to how to proceed?
Thanks, San Diego Joe
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Try Sikkens Cetol. It's the best product that I've come across. The finish will last a few years, and when it's time to re-apply it can go over top of the old finish - no stripping required.
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"mp" wrote:

I notice at their web site that they recommend 3 coats of stain only (Cetol 1), but no coat of anything over that. Is that right?
Thanks, San Diego Joe
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On Wed, 02 Mar 2005 14:28:10 -0800, San Diego Joe wrote:

I've used it on windows. Cetol 1 is not a stain but a tinted varnish. It actually produces a film. Good stuff (so far).
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html
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I made two pieces of furniture last year. One is coated with Sikkins Cetol and the other with Peonofin. Both have UV inhibitors. While they seem to be OK, I'll have to get back to you in five years. I also have a bench coated with Minwax Helmsman that is doing well after about 4 years.
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"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote:

Okay, thanks Edwin. I'll check with you in 2010!
San Diego Joe
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San Diego Joe wrote:

You can't win this one, especially living in S/D.
If you don't want to believe me, take a walk down on Shelter Island and look at some of the boats.
If you don't want to let it gray natural, might consider redwood. It will still require maintenance, but at least you can stay with it.
HTH
Lew
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I hear this said often, but I look at boats on the St. Lawrence Seaway - a lot of 80 year old Lymans and the likes that are Mahogany, and they look like the day they were built. I don't know what the varnish is that they use on these things, but it works, and they don't refinish them every year. I'd suggest checking with a newsgroup for boats.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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"Mike Marlow" wrote:

That's a good idea. Off I go.
--
San Diego Joe


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Mike Marlow wrote:

Totally different world.
1) You are in a fresh, not a salt water area.
(There is a reason they refer to fresh water as "sweet water")
2) Since you are at a higher latitude, you have a much shorter season, say 4 months, maybe 4-1/2, thus much less UV to content with than in the San Diego area with year around UV damage.
As an example, given the same amount of time on the water, if you get 10 years out of a set of sails on the Great Lakes, but you might only get 2-3 in San Diego.
Same applies to coatings.
HTH
Lew
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"Lew Hodgett" wrote:

though, that I've seen many boats where the decks still look pretty good.

Yeah, redwood is on my list too and maybe I'll just have to use it.
Thanks, San Diego Joe
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San Diego Joe wrote:

Totally different ball game.
IMHO, you would rather wear a hair shirt than try to maintain teak bright work.
OTOH, Honduras mahogany can be maintained since you can get a good bond between the wood and your favorite flavor of sheep dip you call varnish.
BTW, latest price for a case of 6, 1,000 ML cans of Epifanes Gloss Varnish is $132.54 + shipping.
A favorite for boats.
If you check it out, will probably find a major difference in price between Redwood & Honduras Mahogany.
Also, if you can live with that stuff they bring in from Africa I call "mahogany of the week", you will save a few $.
HTH
Lew
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In your clime, Mahogany _will_ be maintenance intensive. Marine 'spar' varnish with UV inhibitors -- with full strip/refinish required every couple of years, and _probably_ more often. (Depends how much of the time the furniture is in the shade, and how close to the water you are. I had family in Mission Beach, on the strip between the Ocean and the Bay. Stuff at that house *really* took a beating!) Teak, only a little less so.
Redwood will also require maintenance, but considerably less. A good redwood/cedar oil stain will hold for several years, and re-treatment is just wash the dirt off, and re-apply. "Rez" brand cedar stain is *good* stuff on redwood.
Redwood, teak, and cypress, are about indestructible, but all turn 'grey' if left to weather naturally. They _will_ retain the 'original' color, if you keep up the oils in the wood.
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Use Ipe'
Dave

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Dave,
I was considering Ipe, but am a little worried about (from what I hear) how hard it is to work with. Do you have some experience?
Joe
"Teamcasa" wrote:

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Ipe will dull cheap tools. It does machine well and needs no finish for typical outdoor use. It does sand or scrap smooth (think hammer handles).
I made an garden bench for an old neighbor, she left it in the garden for over 10 years. Never touched it other than sitting.
A google search on its properties will give you more info.
Dave
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wrote:

ultimately you're wasting your time. wood left outdoors turns grey, weathers, splits and eventually decomposes. you can slow it down a little, mebbe a few seasons, but if you want to keep the original color keep it indoors.
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" snipped-for-privacy@all.costs" wrote:

But I already have furniture in my living room. I need something for my deck.
San Diego Joe 4,000 - 5,000 Gallons. Goldfish, a RES named Colombo and an Oscar.
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wrote:

then choose a wood that looks good as it ages (and doesn't tend to make splinters) or figure on a schedule of sanding and refinishing.
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On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 17:57:23 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@all.costs wrote:

brown. Tried exterior poly and spar poly with added UV block. Nothing worked for much more than two years. Finally found that a thin wb poly will last that long, and doesn't crack, so every 2 years I run a belt sander over the top and recoat. I figure it's last for several decades before it gets too thin to hold a coffee cup:-) GerryG
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