Finishes and languages (from Italy)

Hallo!
I am reading 'great wood finishes', and I am really enjoying it.
Unfortunately there is a major drawback: I am Italian, and even though I am quite fond of my english, when it comes to clearly understand which specific product is the author talking about, it is not easy at all; for example, I have no clue what in the world mineral spirits are :{
Well... while keeping my hope to find a 'English-Italian Woodworker's Dictionary' or some bilingual expert carpenter, I thought a good first step would have been to browse some site selling the products, in order to try and understand by the description which the correct translation would be. Could any of you suggest me some site showing a complete range of stains, and fillers, and finishes and else...? Even better, if the site is in Europe, even best if it makes international shippings.
By the way, I browsed Axminster's and found that finishes have often different names than in the book. Should I guess UK and US use different terminology?
Any clue is welcome, Luciano
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Here is a site that might help explain some of the solvents used in finishing
http://www.woodfinishingsupplies.com/faqs.htm
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wrote:

For specific questions, you can ask on sci.lang.translation, the group dealing with all subjects relating to translation. Non-commercial queries receive helpful answers from translators from a wide variety of backgrounds, and English-Italian is a common language pair.
When posting there, specify language pair and technical area in your heading, and as much context as possible in your post, this will help in getting useful replies.
Mineral spirits is what is known in the UK as "white spirit" or"petroleum spirit".
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Sun, Jul 25, 2004, 10:52pm (EDT+6) snipped-for-privacy@fatwebnet.it (Feanorelf) asks: <snip> Should I guess UK and US use different terminology? <snip>
No need to guess, sometimes we do. And, if you check the thread on "latex paint", you will find that the US, the UK, Australia (OZ), and South Africa (SA), all have different names for the same type of paint.
Personally, for cleaning brushes, I seldom use mineral spirits. I usually use kerosene, as it's called in the US. As I seldom use oil based paints, that's handier, and cheaper. Not 100% sure, but believe the UK may call it parrafin. And, the US calls wax parrafin. I have no idea what OZ and SA call either.
JOAT Expensive tennis shoes won't cure a sore toe. - Bazooka Joe THE NEW COPPERPLATE http://www.banjer.com/midi/newcopp.mid
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In my experience...... mineral spirits [US] = paint thinner [US] denatured alcohol [US] = methalated spirits [UK] parafin [UK] = kerosene [US] mars bar [UK] = milky way [US] -- http://members.tripod.com/mikehide2
(Feanorelf)

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Tue, Jul 27, 2004, 4:25am (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (MikeHide) claims: In my experience...... <snip> mars bar [UK] = milky way [US]
That sounds highly suspect, considering the US has a Mars Bar - that says Mars Bar, on the label.
That being the case, what would the UK call a US Mars Bar? A Milky Way?
And, what would happen if you took a US Mars Bar, and a US Milky Way, to England? And, then returned with a UK Mars Bar?
JOAT Expensive tennis shoes won't cure a sore toe. - Bazooka Joe THE NEW COPPERPLATE http://www.banjer.com/midi/newcopp.mid
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J T wrote:

That would depend upon how close to the speed of light you were able to achieve in returning it.     j4
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On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 03:15:38 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

the department of homeland security would arrest you.
obvious terrorist stunt.
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Take a look at this web site.....http://www.fact-index.com/m/ma/mars_bar.html........mjh
-- http://members.tripod.com/mikehide2
(Mike Hide)

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-- http://members.tripod.com/mikehide2
(Mike Hide) claims: In my experience...... <snip> mars bar [UK] = milky way [US]
That sounds highly suspect, considering the US has a Mars Bar - that says Mars Bar, on the label.
That being the case, what would the UK call a US Mars Bar? A Milky Way?
exactly.
And, what would happen if you took a US Mars Bar, and a US Milky Way, to England? And, then returned with a UK Mars Bar?
I think it all stems from the fact that the Mars familysplit and some set up shop in the UK, so they just reversed the names .
If you dont believe me just ask any UK members in this group top describe a UK mars bar.....mjh
JOAT Expensive tennis shoes won't cure a sore toe. - Bazooka Joe THE NEW COPPERPLATE http://www.banjer.com/midi/newcopp.mid
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Tue, Jul 27, 2004, 5:39pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (MikeHide) who claims his lawyers told him that technically he wasn't eating candy, because it was from the UK, claims: <snip> I think it all stems from the fact that the Mars familysplit and some set up shop in the UK, so they just reversed the names . <snip>
Are you sure you're not related to Slick Willy? You're leaving out critical info. For example, in the link you posted, is the following: And the UK "Milky Way" is called the "3 Musketeers".
I'm not sure what you're up to, but you "are" entitled to your rights, so we will consider you guilty, unlelss found innocent by a court of law.
JOAT Expensive tennis shoes won't cure a sore toe. - Bazooka Joe JERUSALEM RIDGE http://www.banjer.com/midi/jerridge.mid
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net says...

Here are some differences from SA
Mineral spirits        Turpentine substitute Naptha                Benzine Kerosene            Parafin Denatured alcohol         Industrial methalated spirits ?                Meths (the purple stuff that is filtered                      through bread as a cheap drink)                 Think it contains Piridine
There are most probably a lot more.
--

Phillip Hansen
Skil-Phil Solutions
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I wrote a paper for a USA college English class that was devoted to the differences in the English spelling compared to US spelling of the same things. Favour/favor, colour/color without getting into cramps/clamps. Ask here and you'll get some type of answer.
wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@vcoms.net wrote:

<SNIP> Wouldn't the last one (cramps/clamps) be a comparison of English and Chinese?
;-) Glen
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My understanding is "cramps" is UK usage. Which "English" were you referring to UK or USA?

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snipped-for-privacy@vcoms.net says...

From the SA side. Cramp - stomach in convulsion - Too much curry Clamp - a device to hold together 2 objects
--

Phillip Hansen
Skil-Phil Solutions
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scribbled:

Try: http://europa.eu.int/eurodicautom/Controller
which is the EU's on-line technical dictionary. And, yes, the terminology is different in the UK and the US and yet different again in Canada and I suspect Australia. For example, I, as a Canadian, have no clue what naphtha is in the US; here it refers to camp fuel.
I wish I could help you more, being of Italian origin and the son of an Italian cabinetmaker, but the only word I know is "vernice", which Italians seem to apply to everything indifferently, including varnish, paint, lacquer and ceramic glaze (but not shellac, which is gomma lacca, I'm sure Paddy will be happy to hear).
BTW, mineral spirits is a type of paint thinner (diluente o solvente per pittura o vernice, no so quale sono le traduzioni giuste) somewhat lighter and less smelly than kerosene (which the Brits call paraffin). Esso's version goes under the trade name "Varsol"
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html
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