Dumb question about drawer slides

Page 2 of 2  
snipped-for-privacy@killspammers.die.die.die.adelphia.net says...

Would Pro-E (PTC's Pro-Engineer) meet your needs? I suspect it is considerably more expensive than AutoCad, but it might be less frustrating.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
brought forth from the murky depths:

"Howdy, friends. This is your old pal Ralph Spoilsport of Ralph Spoilsport Motors, here in the city of West Gomorrah Junction. We've got some outtasite bargains for you. AutoCad v927 for just 38 easy monthly payments of $1,436,719.23!"
--
STOP THE SLAUGHTER! || http://diversify.com
Boycott Baby Oil! || Programmed Websites
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom,
Nothing wrong with 3832's and they were my slide of choice for years. However now the Blum Tandem full extension is my stock slide. True, they are quite a bit more expensive but the expensive is not a large part of the job. Considering the life of the cabinets I believe the upgrade is well worth considering.
And no jig needed
Mike

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Jon Endres, PE" spoke thusly:

I'll dig them out tomorrow and get a shot of them to post.

most
offsets
Accuride - 3832 is what I use, mostly.

an
I did my latest kitchen modular, basically working in increments of 3" for the different sizes. IIRC, I had about 36 linear feet of base cabinets, not including the island.
Most of my wall units, and their corresponding base with drawers, are 27" wide. The sink base is 51" wide. The wall unit above the fridge is 36", and the wall unit above the range is 42". The two double sided base cabinets under the Island are 42". I've got a couple more that were odd sizes and shapes to conform to wall angles, including one 60" base cab that is only 12" deep as it goes into a hall way, and a pantry that is 24" wide, 24" deep on one end and 12" on the other.
If you haven't already thought about it, standard height for wall units is generally 30". In many cases, and if your ceiling allows it, making them taller by 3 - 6" can improve the looks of the kitchen tremendously, as can making some of them, perhaps in the center of a run, or on the ends, a little taller than the others. By the time you get trim on these they are stunning.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 1/16/04
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Where I have trouble is the where to mount the slides so when I go to install the drawer it's not to high or to low. I don't do a lot of them because of that, I get agravated having to tweak them up or down. Any tips on getting this part accurate? Thanks
--
Mike S.
snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

When I only have to do a couple I simply mark out the centerlines and match them up.
When I have to do something like an entire kitchen I cut out pieces of ply or MDF to represent the spacing of the base unit, the middle drawer and the top, or whatever configuration that you are using. Sometimes you have a bunch of base units with doors on the bottom and a drawer on the top. The template works well for this. Since I standardized my drawer units, I had templates for three to six drawer vertical layouts as well as the usual door/drawer setup. The nice thing about this is that it works every time. A typical kitchen only has about three configurations for base units.
This was before I switched to the 32mm system, where the holes are laid out by the machinery that you use and the heights are adjustable within the 32mm module, making vertical layout a snap.
Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker (ret) Real Email is: tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet Website: http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually, Swingman, a wise old wRECk veteran recommended to me that you should allow for 1 1/16" total for the slides (17/32" per slide instead of 1/2"). That gives you 1/32" per side to adjust the slide or add shims should the carcase be off a little. I tried it, it works, and I'll never go back. :-)
Thanks Keeter...
--
Regards,

Rick

(Remove the HIGH SPOTS for e-mail)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Rick Chamberlain" wrote in message

Actually, Rick, I've heard that before, but have not needed to practice it. providing you make your drawers accurately, a 1/32nd on either side is not usually a problem as there is at least that much slop on most slides on each side.
AAMOF, it might be just my luck, but I've yet to have to add shims by going by what the specs on the drawer slide called for. More often, I've had to shave a bit off the secondary wood, which would have made made matters worse adding the 1/16th.
Just my experience. ;>)
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 1/16/04
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
that's the way I do it too. 'course I'm not a woodworking veteran, but it works for me. shooting for a drawer 1" narrower than the opening when you are using prefinished baltic birch is cutting it too close. I go shoot for 1-1/32 narrower so that I don't' have to shave anything down. The KV slides I use barely have 1/16" leeway.
dave
Rick Chamberlain wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bay Area Dave" wrote in message

It's not a bad idea if you are NOT using face frame construction, to add the 1/16th and make your drawer slightly narrower than required.
However, on face frame cabinets, which is what I posted about, it is much easier to me to 'shave' than to 'shim' ... particularly in 1/32" increments. Therefore, I would prefer to go with the drawer slide manufacturer's recommendation, and NOT make the drawer narrower.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 1/16/04
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
24" is the outside dimension of the cabinet; inside is 24" minus back thickness. Use next shorter glide. Glides come in 2" increments; so use the 22" glide in this case.
--
Alan Bierbaum

Web Site: http://www.calanb.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 21 Jan 2004 17:39:37 GMT, "Jon Endres, PE"

depends on how your cabinet is constructed. the slide length number is the length of the slide, not the cabinet. I generally build 'em to loose 1" at the back (1/4" nailer + 1/4" panel) and 3/4" at the front (face frame) which would give 22-1/4" inside of a 24" cabinet. in that case I'd build 22" drawers and use 22" slides.
it's not uncommon for the cabinets to be some size other than 24" though. get a tape measure and see what size the inside of your cabinets really are....     Bridger
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

oops. that should have been 3/4" nailer + 1/4" back panel.
sorry about that. carry on now....

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Jon Endres, PE" wrote:

I'm in the process of replacing the drawers in my kitchen cabinets. My cabinets are face frame construction and are 24" deep. I bought the Accuride (Series 3832) 22" slides. For face frame construction Accuride's use a "Face Frame Kit" which consists for clip on mounting brackets for the front and back of each slide. The rear bracket is length adjustable from approx. 0"- 2".
See:
http://www.accuride.com/products/woodworking/details.php?p832sc&c=mediumduty_wa
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've worked in shops where the standard was 20" and I've worked in shops where the standard was 22".
UA100
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 21 Jan 2004 17:39:37 GMT, "Jon Endres, PE"

Jon:
I liked to spec 22" slides with a 1" overtravel. If you don't go for the overtravel slide, you really don't have full access to the drawer box.
Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker (ret) Real Email is: tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet Website: http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Here's one reference....
http://shop.woodcraft.com/Woodcraft/assets/html/drawerslide.asp?Gift lse&GiftID I use 22"long slides in 24" deep cabinets.
Bob S.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I used 40, Accuride 2832, 22" full extension slides for the kitchen. Wouldn't use any others.
RB
Jon Endres, PE wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.