Drawer-making tip

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Here's a little woodworking tip. When you're gluing up a drawer, put the drawer bottom in BEFORE you glue it up. Has anyone else noticed that the speed at which glue sets up is directly proportional to your need to take the joint apart?
todd
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I'm sure that's never been done before...
I did one and stepped out for some dinner... That required a table saw to fix...
Todd Fatheree wrote:

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On Fri, 28 May 2004 08:44:18 -0500, "Todd Fatheree"
|Here's a little woodworking tip. When you're gluing up a drawer, put the |drawer bottom in BEFORE you glue it up.
Good tip; I will try to remember it.
|Has anyone else noticed that the |speed at which glue sets up is directly proportional to your need to take |the joint apart?
Especially if you've just fired in some brads to hold it together until the glue dries. [g].
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Hm, that sounds familiar.
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wrote:

Doesn't the bottom slide in from the back & get tacked in place? Or is this a fancier drawer than I've been building?
Dave Hinz
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That crossed my mind too Dave. Although I don't usually build them that way, that would be a good way to fix the problem. Just take a cut across the back of the drawer and slip the bottom in place. My preference for drawers is to enclose them in a dado on all four sides. I've seen too many drawers with the bottom sagging loose at the back, which of course is not a problem with the technique but with the execution.
-- Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com/woodshop
wrote:

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wrote:

The way I've always done it, which is neither right nor wrong, is to dado every drawer side and slide the bottom in during glue-up.
todd
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"Dave Hinz" wrote in message

Now you know just one of the reasons why the above is still my favorite method of drawer construction. I've never had one sag and, should someone ask, rank the ability to do any future fixes to the bottom of a drawer as an important *feature*.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 5/15/04
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So, when you make the back of the drawer, it the back piece just narrower such that the bottom is in line with the top of the groove on the other pieces?
todd
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Yep.
Patriarch
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And here's Frank Klausz's method of cutting the groove for the bottom AND getting the back piece to line up with the groove.
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/DovetailDrawer5.html
charlie b
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wrote:

The way I do it is to rabbet the groove in all 4, and then cut off the back from the rabbet down. The drawer bottom then slides right in the back, 3 brads with large-ish heads and I'm done. Might be another way to do it, but that's what I've been doing.
Dave Hinz
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On Fri, 28 May 2004 16:51:01 -0500, "Todd Fatheree"

Frankly, I like the way you do it better, it just seems that it will make a stronger drawer.
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On Sat, 29 May 2004 02:14:46 GMT, Mark & Juanita

If you are using a plywood bottom then the usual method is to glue it in resulting in a very strong drawer. The method being described of sliding the dawer in is generally used in 'fine' furniture where the drawer bottom is of solid wood. The bottom panel is glued up with the grain running side to side. This requires some method to deal with wood movement.. Hence, the back is left open and the drawer tacked in using a slotted screw hole . Note: Don't make the mistake of gluing up bottom panel with grain running front to back of drawer unless you want some very stuck drawers :-)
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wrote:

Seems like the same effect would be achieved by leaving sufficient clearance in the back dado.

Yep, the current issue of FWW had to publish a correction to one of their prior issues pointing out exactly that.
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On Sat, 29 May 2004 20:31:03 GMT, Mark & Juanita

much as, or more than, the thickness of the drawer back. In other words; you cannot make the dado deep enough to allow for maximum wood movement due to moisture.
Alan Bierbaum
web site: http://www.calanb.com
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wrote:

ah, good point. I'll keep that in mind in the future. Thanks.
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"Todd Fatheree" wrote in message

Yep ... the back of the drawer bottom slides into place and is fastened to the bottom of the back of the drawer, at the same level that the groove/dado is cut.
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Todd Fatheree wrote:

It's almost as hard as trying to route the grooves for the bottom after the glueup:-( Then you have to round the corners to fit in the front and hand saw/chisel the pieces in the back the router can't reach. Joe
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Todd Fatheree wrote:

And it's not just drawers.
I'm doing a box - profiled maple bottom "frame" with fiddle back cherry panel, rosewood carcase/carcass, profiled maple top "frame" with fiddle back cherry panel. The "frames" have 1/4" loose tenon joints, which, while great for aligning things and strengthening the miter join, makes the glue up a little more complicated. And if you're doing it at midnite - well ....
Fortunately, the carcase/carcass hasn't been glued up yet so I can still route a groove in those parts for the bottom panel. Of course the dado on the inside of the bottom maple frame will show. Maybe I'll put cherry in the groove and call it an intended inlay "feature" that only the owner will know about. People love secrets. There's a Navajo or Hopi jeweler, Charles Laloma, who does bracelets and rings which have the best stones in the piece on the inside of the piece.
Short of "shorting" a part, most screw ups can, with a little imagination, be turned into a "feature".
charlie b
All roads lead to Rome. But the closer you get, the longer it takes to get there.
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