Domin-OH (wow)

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But when I hand-cut my dovetails, for example, I eyeball the spacing and mark the pins from the tails, using the tails as the story board.
When I build furniture, I see no reason to specify that a leg is 1 and 17/32 square, I simply use 1 1/2. The mortices are either hand chopped with an appropriately sized morticing chisel (or for bulk work with the hollow-chisel morticer(GI) or the stationary horizontal mortiser(Laguna)). The tenons are fitted to to the mortice (loose or otherwise). The aprons may be 3/4 thick, but +/- 1/16 either way isn't a problem so long as they are all the _same_ thickness.
For doors, make sure all the stiles are the same length/w/t (use a stop block when cutting). Make sure all the rails are the same length (stop block), width (fence) and thickness (jointer/planer or handplane). Whether they are 25/32 or 24/32 thick doesn't really matter so long as they are all the _same_.
It is not often that I need to _measure_ to a point between the 1/8" graduations on a rule. I _like_ my incra rules (but more because of the holes than because it has 64ths).
scott
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On 2/26/2013 12:08 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

You will respect that 1/32nd much more when doing angled joinery, precise reveals, and parallel components for trouble free drawer and inset door installation. ;)

Sometimes ... Let's be as precise in our responses as in our measurements:
For the uninitiated, it is only fair to point out the absolute necessity of using the _same_ "reference face" when determining the location of mortises and tenons from either edge, otherwise any "reveal", or squareness, you planned into your design may likely depart from that design if you're mortises and tenons are not perfectly centered in the stock, ether by design or by not being precise in your measurements, particularly when doing angled components ... IOW, this is a place where being 1/32" of in on or both can cause you grief if you ignore that degree of precision in woodworking.
Just so happens I'm working on a chair reproduction as we speak where the side aprons are 13/16" thick ... the error from using the wrong face when installing the aprons is exactly 1/32" ... enough to cause a gap and reveal error on either the front or back leg.
Again, that 1/32" lack of precision can bite you in the butt. ;)

Yes, it's called "batch cutting", and if you'll check my posts for past twelve years here, you'll see I'm a big proponent.

A leg that is 1/32" shorter than the rest will rock.
A front apron and back apron that are 1/32" off in length can cause a table/chair leg reveal, or component squareness to be off by 1/16" at 24" ... totally unacceptable if the desired reveal is 1/8" ... or if the drawer sides must be parallel.
As above, throw in angular error ... angles being much more difficult to dial in precisely than length, width or thickness ... making 1/32nd precision in said length, width or thickness, even more of a minimum requirement.
Just a few of the reasons why I endeavor to work to 1/32" precision in woodworking ... YMMV
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On 2/26/2013 1:21 PM, Swingman wrote:

Case in point:
Today, in order to get this:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopMissionChairReproduction2013#5849359132307708194
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopMissionChairReproduction2013#5849360549402609826
I had to measure, with the same precision as the drawing (1/32") thusly:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopMissionChairReproduction2013#5849367870123088434
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopMissionChairReproduction2013#5849363206265997442
(I use an Incra Rule and .05 Incra pencil lead when laying out to facilitate this)
What it boils down to ... when you work from a precision drawing (Sketchup's precision, IIRC, is the same as AutoCad: 0.000001), you do yourself a big favor by trusting your model and using the actual dimensions of the drawing to the best of your ability.
This will guarantee you that, if you take care in measurements and use the same resolution, you can accurately fabricate that model in real life, no matter how many you have to scale to fit a space.
This may not seem like much, but put 12 cabinets side by side and expect everything to line up with precision and work out without a hitch, _in a space that did not even exist when you built the cabinets_ , you gotta learn to trust your tools. :)
Even more important when you work with someone else and they use the same methods and sense of meticulous precision, but work in another location.
Example: Leon built this cabinet, on less than 24 hours notice, in his shop, and from a drawing, and it fit in between two already installed components _precisely_ the next morning, I do mean precisely:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopEuropeanStyleKitchen201102#5679345527006982290
From this:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJustStuff#5849377120382568930
(and yes, we calibrated/checked our table saw fence rulers about six years ago)
And, I'm still impressed that by that feat ... :)
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Wow ...
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Best regards
Han
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On 2/26/2013 3:35 PM, Swingman wrote:

Even more important when you work with someone else and they use the same methods and sense of meticulous precision
Damn, I going to have to copy paste this in my note app on my phone so that I can sound more better when explaining things. ;~)
A neighbor stopped by and was wondering how all this, computer to workshop, stuff worked, I summed up your phrase above by simply saying that it helps to be "AR".
Thinking back to this morning when setting up a dado to within .005" of being 1/2" wide after adjusting the first trial cut. That is a precision that is approaching 5/1016". FWIW that is hard to see on the ruler. ;~) Thank goodness for electronic calipers.
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Nice work, I don't understand why people argue about trying for as much accuracy as you can get. My experience has been that the more attention to the detail saves a lot of problems in finishing a project. You have a system that works well for you. I can't claim to always work to that accuracy but I applaud you for holding yourself to your standard.
Mike M
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wrote:

execute all of it yet. Did invest in the drill press table and fence from Woodpecker so looking forward to trying that. I do agree with the idea of using sketchup and batch cutting. I'm also quilty of having way to many things going on. Anyway your project is coming along great and looks great as well. If I didn't have to take these pain pills it would probably help my accuracy too.
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Wow ...
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Best regards
Han
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https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopMissionChairReproduction2013#5852694851810598658

No kidding but looking really good!

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Swingman wrote:

I'd go 21*25.4 +3/4(3). The calculation induced from 24mm/in looks a little short.

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About half a meter... 21 * 2 = 42 21 * .5 = 11.5, so 53.5 cm
Good enough for a "Quick and in your head" measurement.
I'll never make any cuts off a "Quick and in your head" conversion. All they're good for is magnitude checking.
Another useful magnitude check is meters to feet. Figure 1 meter is approximately 1 yard, and every 3 meters adds another foot. So multiply by 3, divide by 3 and add. By this method 25 m ~= 83.3 (~= means approximately equal), in reality it's 82.021'
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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