Does this look safe?

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I won't either. Doesn't seem like a good idea to me.
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That's something I have never quite understood. I can understand a pro buying them...if they help you make money, it is worth the money but so many people doing woodworking as a hobby buy a multitude of jigs, whatchamacallits and thingys when they could very easily make the same thing. Why?
The same thing was true in photography...many of the pros had every Hasselblad lens and accessory ever made, rarely - if ever - used them. In their case, I understand the impetus...the thinking was, "With this I can make great photos". It was rarely true, great pix come from the mind, not gear. Same thing with woodworking.
--

dadiOH
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On 11/19/14, 2:10 PM, dadiOH wrote:

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On 11/19/2014 3:34 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

I think it is a good idea, but a poor implemenation of the idea
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On 11/19/2014 4:32 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

On that note, they stress the ease of use, stating that you need no clamps, no double-stick tape etc. But what if your work piece is wider than the span of your fingers? How do you hold the (very small) jig securely then?
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On 11/19/14, 5:14 PM, Leon wrote:

Dull things always seem to be the problem. I don't think I've ever been cut by a sharp tool. It's always the dulls tools that slip and getcha.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 11/19/2014 4:18 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

They hurt more too. More than once, I've been cut by a really sharp blade and didn't even know it until I looked down and saw blood.
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BTDT -- wondering what kept making these odd little red spots on the maple. Fortunately, hydrogen peroxide took care of the stains...
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Poloroid instant camera circa 1960? :)
I had one in 1970 ~ about five minutes for it to develop and then a few minutes for the sealer to work. About ten minutes time for each black and white picture. Not exactly mobile phone speed, but all in all not too bad for that era.
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On 11/19/2014 9:34 PM, snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote:

^^^

Yabbut, but where's the url go?
:)
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Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
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On 11/20/2014 6:44 AM, Swingman wrote:

That's spelled o-i-l, not u-r-l. And anyway, I think it was more like lacquer.
:)
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----------------------------------------------------- Late 50's
A displacement transducer connected to an amplifier which in turn serves as an input to a scope equipped with a Polaroid used to capture pictures of scope traces of drop tests.
Next sit down at your desk and using an engineer's scale, measure the traces and integrate the area under the curves to determine the amount of energy absorbed by the test piece (Rubber draft gears used on railroad cars).
I was doing this as a co-op student while the Ruskis were developing Sputnik along about then.
Lew
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Morse code. ..- .-. .-..
:)
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On 11/21/2014 2:51 PM, Leon wrote:

That is Norm Thinking. Everybody doing wood working does not have the cash so they could by a CNC Miller or a 50 inch sander like Norm uses.
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I have a very small CNC wood router, and a couple CNC Mills, but I often find some jobs (especially one off jobs) are faster to do with manual tools. Sometimes I make tools or jigs to make manual machining and cutting easier. Sometimes I make jigs to make CNC machining easier too. LOL. (Usually for setting up the work piece repeatably, or aligning multiple parts cut separately.)
As to Wood Peckers since they make the tools they sell (or a lot of them anyway) I suspect that anything they have a large demand for they will run a batch of, but setting up to make one or two just isn't cost effective for them.
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I've been thinking about picking up a CNC Mill. Have you tried doing square inside corners like window cut outs? One of my primary uses would be cutting out styrene for model kits, but I say that knowing I bought a lathe for model railroad work and only used it for that twice. :-)
This is a simple building, but I'm hoping a CNC mill would let me do more complex projects:
http://puckdroppersplace.us/other/Light%20On.JPG
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

If you mean to profile cut the inside of a square or rectangle then the sharpness of the inside corner of your final cut is limited by the radius of your cutter. Depending on the exact application this is often dealt with by doing a corner over cut operation. I imagine for something like glass hung with glazing compound it would be no big deal, but for other operations not so much. Note, thoyugh that there are other reasons windows and window frames are cut out of multiple pieces and assembled. Even mass produced machine built windows like Pella or Milguard.
.

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On 11/18/2014 11:04 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

It actually doesn't look that dangerous. The whole jig would need to slide off the work almost completely in order for it to get into the router bit's cutting edges. But it's certainly possible, and if it ever did happen, the results could definitely be disastrous... and we all know how quickly those kinds of disasters happen with power tools.
The bigger question for me is why would I ever need this? I never had one. Any shop with a real need for it would build a more safe and secure version from scrap parts at no cost except the fabrication time.
Honestly, I believe it's another unnecessary item marketed to newbies with more money than sense or ingenuity, and who still have not yet soiled their shorts doing something really stupid.
John '10 Fingers' Paquay
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wrote:

Yep, only three steps.
Buy a CNC machine Program it Machine.
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