Do you use bar oil in your chainsaw?

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Larry Jaques wrote:

Contrary to the idiocy often evidence by DEQ's, it takes quite a spill to contaminate groundwater. BTW, got to start using those terms correctly. You can't contaminate the water table. That's like "spilling coffee on the inches." Water table is just an elevation. What gets contaminated in ground water or "aquifer" if you prefer. There's another common mistake "ground water aquifer" because ground water and aquifer mean the same thing. Oops, guess the old editor job just spilled out.
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On Fri, 24 Jun 2005 02:06:53 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

Haven't been following this too closely. I thought bar oil was what you get on your elbows.
Joe
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[...]

<mode="nitpick"> Isn't the aquifer rather the structure in the ground that contains the ground water than the water itself? The word certainly means that (it would be something like "water carrier"). </mode> ;-) Juergen
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Juergen Hannappel wrote:

Technically, you are correct. But you can't have groundwater without an aquifer and you can't have an aquifer without groundwater. So ground water aquifer is still redundant. In common usage, aquifer is used interchangeably with ground water.
But stupidities abound as I saw in my dictionary. They define aquifer spring. It should be quite obvious that all springs are simply groundwater coming to the surface. So springs necessarily require an aquifer.
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On Fri, 24 Jun 2005 02:06:53 GMT, the opaque "George E. Cawthon"

ACK.
OK, my water table is about 20' and my well is 26' deep.
How much oil it would take to contaminate the aquifer containing my drinking water? Much less than one at 300' deep, I'm sure.
----- = Dain Bramaged...but having lots of fun! http://www.diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development
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"George E. Cawthon" wrote:

No way to test that hypothesis here... :)
Although minimizing compaction w/ low- and no-till is showing very good results after a number of years of continuous practice.
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

<snip>
Low- and no-till logging?
R, Tom Q.
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Tom Q.

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Tom Quackenbush wrote:

...farming...no trees here.
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Works the same in logging. Soft spots logged in the winter when the ground's frozen, high, sandy stuff with pine in the summer. When the forest's really dense, an Iron Mule can't find a way to hit the ground for the roots. The call it "low impact" logging.
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the
Around here, ( a mountainous region and fairly near to the pacific ocean ) one of the biggest problems with logging is the soil erosion and subsequent sedimention occuring in the the rivers and streams...( salmon spawing habitat--if you bury them eggs then the little fisheys don't got much of a chance )
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Or for that matter, what difference does it make? I'll tell you another thing that isn't "biodegradable" and stays forever - dirt.
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Juergen Hannappel wrote:

Yep, the best is peanut oil, second best is cotton seed oil, last is corn oil. ;)
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writes:

Yeah, producing all those crops is definately GOOD for the environment !!!
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I use stihl bar lube and stp mixed 10 to 1, it might sound silly but my chain seems to stay sharp longer with less stretch. I cut alot of locust trees for posts and firewood each season.
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I use Poulan bar oil from Walmart. Its 30 weight with a tackifier (sp?) in it so it sticks to the chain better than motor oil. Since it doesn't have any of the additives needed to keep an engine clean, its cheaper than motor oil too.
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Bar & chain oil is a *lot* thicker and stickier than motor oil. This helps it stay on the chain. Motor oil will work, but it gets slung off the chain pretty quickly, so you have to replenish the oil reservoir more often. And it makes a hell of a mess.
Bottom line: motor oil is cheaper, but you use more of it. I'm guessing it's about even, price-wise.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Getting slung off the bar doesn't cause the saw to use more oil. Just means that the bar gets hotter, unless you dial up the oil flow. 'Course all you need to do is add a little Motor Honey or STP additive.

That isn't true either, standard brands of motor oil are more expensive unless you find a really good sale.

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i.e. it isn't getting adequate lubrication...

And obviously if you dial up the oil flow, you use more oil.

Or just use bar & chain oil to start with....

In that case, what possible point is there in using motor oil? More expensive, and you need more of it, equals "bad idea" from where I stand.
Then there's your suggestion of adding STP... making a more-expensive alternative even *more* expensive. I'm having trouble understanding why anyone would want to do that...
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Doug Miller wrote:

Absolutely.
Simple. You don't buy motor oil in preference to bar oil. But if you have oil that otherwise you wouldn't use (bad brand, high viscosity, low quality/service rating; somebody gives you oil; or you buy oil on sale for less than 50 cents a quart, then use it instead of buying bar oil. BTW, adding STP/Motor Honey will add less than 50 cents to a gallon of oil. And then, maybe somebody will give you the Motor Honey.
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On our old (craftsman) saw, the manual specified 30w motor oil... we gave it a lot of use for about 6 years and only replaced the chain once..
On our new stihl, the dealer gave me 4 quarts of stihl chain saw oil at cost, if I promised not to use motor oil later.. lol
mac
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