did a stupid thing again...

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Cutting up some 3/4" plywood on the TS into 16" squares for a daughter's school project. Absentmindedly, I ran a piece through using the fence - for a crosscut. The blade picked that sucker up and tossed it at a hundred miles an hour into me (well, it felt that fast..). Hit me in the lower left abdomen just inside from the hip bone. Got a big nasty bruise and two bloody scrapes. I had jeans on, and it ripped a hole in them. I shudder to think about the damage to me if it had hit a little closer to center.......
My very adequate crosscut sled was leaning against the wall 6 feet away....
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On Sat, 13 Nov 2004 21:17:30 -0600, "bob"

Glad to hear you weren't hurt worse, but I'm a little confused on what you consider "cross-cutting" on plywood that is 16" square. Sounds like you were either working without a splitter or standing in the wrong place.
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Bob I think you might want to brush up on your technique. You should have not have had any problem making that cut. I do cuts like that all the time. You must be sure that the piece stays flat against the fence and that you hold the piece down. Anyway it is good to hear that you came through OK.
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I might be wrong, but I interpreted that he used both his miter and his fence at the same time. Geeze Leon, you don't do *that* all the time, do you?
--

-Mike-
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news:gKHld.3567

No mention of a miter gauge. No I do not use both.
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I agree with the others here. It isn't the cut that caused this. It is either the table saw or the tool operator. Check everything for square on the saw, and otherwise brush up on your technique. There is nothing wrong with using the fence for cross cutting per se, but when also using the miter guage to make the cross cuts then it becomes a good idea to avoid doing so.
Brian.

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I let the wood twist a hair at the end of the cut (without a splitter and without anything pushing down on the wood) and the blade caught the board an threw it back at me. It not only hurt, but I had a lot of work to do to replace the ruined board. Now I use either a splitter or a Gripper; either would have prevented the accident.
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wrote:

Agreed here, plywood is neither crosscut nor ripped- the grain goes both ways.

Yes, there is. It's dangerous, and bad advice- you can get away with something a hundred times, but that doesn't make it okay when you get a piece of timber lodged in your stomach the 101st time. In the context of plywood, it doesn't matter, but you are not cross-cutting in that situation.

Aut inveniam viam aut faciam
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bob wrote:

I have a scar on my left hand from a similar "accident" over a year ago. I'm glad you weren't seriously hurt. "Think twice, Cut once."
-- Mark
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Sat, Nov 13, 2004, 9:17pm (EST-1) snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (bob) says: <snip> Hit me <snip> What I would like to know is, with all the tales of kickback on here, why is it people still stand where they'll get hit if it happens?
JOAT Any plan is bad which is incapable of modification. - Publilius Syrus
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I for one don't. At least, not after the first time it happened to me.
Long before I discovered rec.wooddorking, I bought a table saw, and did essentially the same thing.
Which I suspect made me feel just as dumb as Mark did. :)
Now, I stand off to the right hand side if possible. And I don't use the fence and the miter gauge at the same time.

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I stand off to the right as well, but the power switch is on the left. Sometimes it's awkward to turn off and on. I actually thought about trying to move it.
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mark wrote:

I always stand to the left of the blade and that is the way I was taught. Now I'm wondering why you both stand to the right? The switch in on the left on my Delta ts, too. A buddy's Dad also stood to the left and had his emergency switch on a pole to the left as well. I wonder if he was a Lefty? I'm not.
Josie
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Depends on what you are cutting. Ripping an 8" board down the middle, yes, on the left.
Cutting a 36" x 36" sheet of plywood down to 24", I'm on the right as there is lots of room between me and the fence.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Yikes, this is something you decide piece by piece? I'm going to have to think about that for a while.
Josie
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On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 04:51:48 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

a few weeks ago. The tooth marks on the wood were almost a perfect 1/4 circle from one corner to the opposite corner. It was my fault for crosscuting with the rip fence, but it certainly wasn't a predictable path that the piece took.

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...and without even picking up that crosscut sled, all you had to do was remove or simply move that rip fence away from the stock. Rip fence and crosscuts are a guarantee of a kickback. Shame on you.
--

-Mike-
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On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 11:55:26 GMT, "Mike Marlow"

Free hand cuts would be even more dangerous. There is no mention of a miter gauge being used. Again, what constitutes "crosscut" on a piece of plywood?
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You are correct in that I assumed he meant he was using both the miter gauge and the rip fence. That owes to what I hear people here refer to as a cross cut - cutting with a miter or a sled. There was a discussion here not so long ago that created the impression that the use of that term implied using either a miter gauge or a cross cut sled. The OP even mentioned a cross cut sled so, I just merrily followed down that path. Simply using a rip fence to perform a cross cut (assuming a piece of wood that *can* really be cross cut) does not pose an inherent problem.
--

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On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 14:10:13 -0700, Mark & Juanita

like cutting an 8' 2x5 into 2 4' pieces..
then again, I think of ripping as cutting the 2x4 into 2 2x2x8' pieces, and his piece of plywood was square...
there goes my concept of "cross cutting" all to hell!!
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