Cutting small wedges for segmented vessels

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Anyone got a workable idea for cutting small wedges for segmented turned vessels without a table saw? The cuts have to be 'very' accurate, as the pieces get glued together into 'perfect' circles.
Thanks,
Greg G.
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Greg G. wrote:

A miter saw.
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Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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no(SPAM)vasys said:

I considered a manual box, but the one I have only cuts set angles, and the thought of cutting 260 little pieces of oak and such with a hand saw didn't appeal to me.
But I guess I didn't ask what was the EASIEST way, now did I. ;-)
CMS isn't really accurate enough, and even with a jig, that spinning 12" blade and a 1" wide piece of stock makes me a little nervous... The tea rout is unacceptable as well - stock blade and I'm not ready to spring on a Forest blade just yet. I just bought the blasted WWII.
Greg G.
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you can do work of any accuracy with any tool. what do you have, if not a table saw?
the less accurate the tool the more handwork you'll have to do to get your parts good enough. at some point it is more accurate and faster to not use a weak machine- just do it all with hand tools.
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snipped-for-privacy@all.costs said:

Everything but... Jointer, planer, bandsaw, CMS, chisels, hammers, hacksaws, drill press, drum sander, lathe, oscilloscopes, hot air soldering stations... hmm nope nothing suitable...
And for your next question... Don't ask...
Actually, I have been working at a jig for the bandsaw, but preliminary tests don't yield accurate enough results.

As I replied to Nova, the thought of precisely cutting up 260 little bits of oak by hand doesn't _really_ appeal to me...
Actually, I posted this to the wrong group - I'm a moron.
Thanks,
Greg G.
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wrote:

Couldnt you use your bandsaw and then straighten up with the Jointer???
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Generally segments for turning are pretty small and short compared with what's considered safe to run over a jointer.
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Owen Lowe
The Fly-by-Night Copper Company
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Cut a long triangular blank (like a Toblerone bar) on the table saw, and then take slices off it on the band saw?
--
"I don't like dealing with people. I'd rather be back working in Human
Resources."
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Dave Balderstone said:

** very funny ***
You are either:
a) Joking
b) Didn't see the "without a table saw" part
c) Not familiar with turning segmented vessels.
Pick the appropriate choices... (I'm just yanking your chain, Dave...)
OK - this went to the wrong group, so to make this PERFECTLY CLEAR...
I have 1" x 2-4" x 4' long oak and misc stock. I have to cut grain matching wedges of wood into precise sections, so that when glued back together, they form a precise circle. Many other 'disks' of these things get glued together and flattened. The diameters increase or decrease depending on their location. After the whole mess is glued together, you turn it on a lathe. You get this:
http://www.thevideodoc.com/Images/SegmentedBowl1.jpg
Does anyone have a realistic answer? Or has the dim become so high and the name recognition so low, that I'm wasting my time here? :-)
Greg G.
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Greg G. said:

That should have been DIN, not dim. But now that I think about it...
Greg G.
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I saw that, but assumed you didn't want to cut with a table saw, not that you didn't *have* a table saw.
My bad.
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Dave Balderstone said:

Don't _even_ go there...

The din in here interferes with comprehension. You're forgiven... ;-)
Greg G.
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Just a thought. You said you have been working on a bandsaw jig, but the precision isn't there yet. Do you have a quality hand plane? Would it be possible to rough out the pieces using your bandsaw jig, then do the precision fitting by using the handplane on adjoining sections simultaneously?

+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Mark & Juanita said:

Hadn't thought about that one, but the differing angles and grain direction would be tough for a plane. But Lee Valley _does_ have that new variable (blade) angle plane... Ohh, Honey....
Sanding would probably be the way to go on this... Probably the best control over what material gets removed...
I think the solution in this case is one of the following:
a) Come up with a platform disk sander with a bed and miter track jig. b) Go to Sears (uggh) and find another tablesaw. c) Drink copiously and forget about it all... ;-)
Thanks,
Greg G.
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wrote:

Well for crap's sake, you know perfectly well that a table saw is the tool you need. Go and buy another table saw or don't do projects that require one. You've shot down every suggestion because you already know the answer. What's the point? Your first order of business is to get a table saw, not to figure out how to do your work without your essential tool.
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Battleax said:

Yea, yea... Sears, right. Not many other places to buy one around here - especially on Saturday night/Sunday.

The disk sander jig was a pretty good idea... One that I will probably use WITH a T-saw in the future.

I HAVE my _essential_ tool, thanks. ;-)
Greg G.
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at this point getting another searz saw sounds like giving up.
bite the bullet and get a general.
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snipped-for-privacy@electron.com says...

Well, if you're close to accurate, you only need to make two half circles and then adjust each to 180 degrees. If you're lucky, the amount you have to take off of each semicircle will be small enough to pass un-noticed.
--
It's turtles, all the way down.

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Hard to do without a table saw.
wrote:

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If you truly want accuracy and pristine glue lines - then no saw will give you what you're looking for. One of the best segmented turners in the business, Curt Theobald <http://www.curttheobald.com/ trues up every piece of wood on his disk sander (after using a miter saw). Not just holding it against the disk by hand, but with a jig that yields repeatable results. Rent or buy his first video, "Introduction to Segmented Turning", <http://www.curttheobald.com/store.html ">, $24.
As the librarian for one of the local chapters of the American Association of Woodturners, I recommend this video as the number one jumping off place for folks looking to get into segmenting.
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Owen Lowe
The Fly-by-Night Copper Company
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