crown molding questiion

My daughter wants to put crown molding in a couple rooms and like many a good dads, I am elected. I know that I will have to make some splices but not sure what is best. She is planning to paint so that may be a factor. Any suggestions are appreciated.
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Norvin wrote:

That splice would be called a scarf cut and it needs to be angled and beveled for a tight fit. Make sure you install some blocking where you think the scarf will be on both ceiling and wall. You need it there because you will have a hard time hitting a stud unless you measurement is right on and why gamble.
4" or 6"? 4" is easier but it disappears because its so small. What height are the ceilings? I'm sure you have more questions.
Rich
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Here are a couple links that may help you install crown moldings
DeWalts instruction page on cutting crown
http://www.dewalt.com/us/articles/article.asp?Site=woodworking&ID=2
http://www.altereagle.com/How_to_install.html
using coping saw http://www.rd.com/17891/article17891.html
http://boydski.com/wood/Crown/InstallingCrown.htm
I usually buy more than I need, as it takes me a couple cuts to get back into doing it right after being away from it for a while. Also, you might want to make up a couple corners and glue, nail them together to use as a reminder, demo, of the cuts you will be making, It's easy to get confused when first putting this up. You will get better as do more of it. CC
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CC wrote:

Instead of gluing corners, depending on what your doing, just make templates that will allow you to use them to line up your saw blade. I usually set the saw up to cut both bevel and miter cut and lay crown flat. I have a very large miter saw though. And if your only doing a rectangular room then you only have to cut inside miter cope cuts. 2 templates.
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When I did crown molding in my house, I bought a jig a lowe's made for cutting crown molding on my mitre saw. The jig is a big help. Make sure you get one of these before you start.
Randy http://nokeswoodworks.com
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Depends on the shape of the room as someody else pointed out.
You can always use corner blocks and make NO miter cuts. I would also recommend putting up a backer board and putting the crown on that. This saves a LOT of trouble in nailing. This creates a nice profile. I have used baseboard turned upside down as backer.
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId4443-2137-QT20043&lpage=none http://www.do-it-yourself-help.com/installing_crown_molding.html
or
Crown molding with training wheels:
http://www.sosimplecrown.com/videoPage.html
Norvin wrote:

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Norvin wrote:

My daughter has decided to put the molding "vertical" and not angle so I am guessing that a backer board will not be a solution. Thanks to all for the good suggestions.
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Vertical crown ????
Norvin wrote:

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Pat Barber wrote:

Perhaps, flat on the wall would have been a better description. My engineering background tells me if things are horizontal, vertical, angled and so on.
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Go to the lumber yard and check out their colonial 4" and 5" base. Put it on upside down, and if you want, trim it with some shoe mold. You will be surprised at how good it looks when painted.
Not my idea... I had a client that did that because he didn't know how to cut crown. By doing it this way he was easily able to control the joinery needed to pull off scarfs and miters.
Actually, laying flat on the wall made it look pretty spiffy.
Robert
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On Mon, 19 May 2008 14:52:32 -0500, Norvin

Never heard of installing crown molding vertically. I question the appearance, but I suppose she will have to live with it.
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Now you have. I found some crown molding that was much the same on both sides and used it to hide a gas pipe that comes down the wall from the ceiling to my fire place. Most folks think it was designed for that purpose. P D Q
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