Craftsman Jointer motor question

i wasfortunate enough to inherit a number of vintage craftsman shop tools, namely a jointer, radial arm saw, 12 or 14" band saw (haven't picked it up yet so not quite sure), and a beltmaster bench grinder. unfortunately, the former owner is deceased and was unable to communicate anything about the tools before passing, and the tools have not been used in some 15 years. there is some light surface rust of course but nothing major. all are from around the mid 1960's, full metal casings, etc.. oh yeah, a huge lathe too, if i can find a trailer to haul it with
questions:
1) are parts and accessories going to be the same as what is available today? for instance, i cant dind a dado head, so i will have to buy that, and who knows what else, i still have some drawers to go through.
2) the motors all appear to work fine, except for the jointer. a hand-labeling stick on the motor said "220 volts", and the plate on the motor says "115/230" for volts; there is no switch to alternate between two voltage settings, and the cord is a standard 3-prong 110. i plugged it in and the motor hums and turns 1/8 turn if i help it a little, like it is under powered and needs 220, but again, the cord is 110 and i am not about to hardwire it for 220 as an experiment... ;-)
any help avaialable?
david
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Call the nearest Sears and ask for the location of a Sears Service Center (might be in same store or separate location). Sears is pretty good at providing parts for their stuff, if it's not too old.

Lotta motors can be rewired for either voltage. Sometimes it's as simple as opening the access plate and reconnecting (a wire nut) a couple of different wires. Some Sears products have the instructions somewhere on the motor. Otherwise, again, contact your Sears Service Center. If you have a 110 plug, and it's not working, it may be the motor was wired for 110 and you just have a bad connection. Remember the post about the Shopsmith?
nb
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If it was set to 220 and still uses the 120v plug - that is a serious breach of law and safety.
They make simple to use plugs and wall sockets for just that.
Be careful. Martin
notbob wrote:

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Martin H. Eastburn wrote:

Code, yes; law, unlikely that NEC is codified anywhere as law.
As for the safety, in general, agreed, it's not the right thing and should be corrected if so but actually isn't much personal danger at all. Biggest problem would be the other end--the wall outlet that would allow for 110V stuff to be plugged in. Again, not particularly personal danger; just liable to trash some appliances.
Again, I'm not advocating it; only that it isn't lethal...
--
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"dpb" wrote:

Since NEC is driven by NFPA, they have a big hammer.
If your building is not in compliance with NEC, don't be surprised if you insurance won't pay in case of a fire.
Lew
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More than likely the moror needs to be oiled on both ends of the armature. I hate to admit this but my boat anchor Craftsman Jointer, 1983, has 2 removeable oil plugs. Put several drops of oil in both and turn by hand.
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Probably a good idea to look over the tools for oil fittings anywhere there's a shaft bearing and top up any that are found.
-Wm
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