Craftsman Hand Tools

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Does anyone know who makes Craftsman hand tools - i.e. wrenches and socket sets, etc. Do they manufactur them or re-brand another mfg's product. The packages all say "Made in the USA".
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The sockets are made by Danaher. I'm not sure about the wrenches. With that said, I've been very unhappy with both.

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Then buy the Craftsman line, not the other shit line that you must be associating with Craftsman. Their hand tools are excellent and a great value. The replacement policy is great and the selection is too. I used them as a mechanic for many many years and only replaced 5-6 at the very most. Still use them and still have them. You sound like one of the typical tool gatherers who frequent this forum and do nothing but bitch about Sears products. John
AL wrote:

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John,
I have to agree with Al on this one. Craftsman hand tools are junk. I used to think they were good too until I used some Mac and Snap-On hand tools. Believe me, there IS a difference.
The Craftsman guarantee doesn't help much when you loose an hour to return and replace the broken tool. $40 lost wages to replace a $10-$20 tool doesn't make sense.
R.C.
wrote:

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Um like the Mac, Matco, or Snap-On truck is going to be on the spot when you break one of their tools? I admit the more expensive tools feel better when turning wrenches all day long but if you get the better polished Craftsman you would have a hard time telling the difference.
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As an ex professional mechanic, I will say I hate snap simply for their high polish, slippery tools. If you work with your hands all day, you could about grab a cactus without problems. Last thing you need is something slippery. I like ratchets and breaker bars with big sharp knurling and wrenches with a large, fat cross section. Snap-On ratchets have those small, slick handles and their wrenches are thin and oval. Great designs to slip and hurt yourself. Alright for working on cars I guess where you really don't have to put much effort into anything but lousy for the big stuff.

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CW.. You are not suppose to apply pressure to the polished wrenches. You are suppose to use an air-ratchet on the other side to do the work. LOL.
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I like the high polish on Snap-on (easy wipe-down) but I agree that they're too slippery. Th ewrnch handles are too oval, not flattened enough to stop them rotating in your hand. My sockets are Snap-on, but the ratchets and wrenches are Facom.
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On Mon, 12 Dec 2005 05:37:51 +0000, CW wrote:

I worked as a die-maker and had the blue callouses to prove it. (Yes, blue. But that's another thread for another newsgroup.) Some things need a light touch (or a smaller tool with guts), some things need a 3' breaker bar and a 12 pound maul. Snap on makes 'finesse' hand tools and gutsy air wrenches. I don't recall seeing a maul in their catalog. But I had one to go with the 5# and 3# dead blow hammers in my lower drawer and the 3' crowbar hanging from my pull-around handle.
Bill
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I'm not saying the Mac or the Snap-On truck is always there. What I am saying is that their tools break far less often.
As an example: I tried to break loose the rusted phillips head screws on some trim moulding by holding the screw driver in the screw head and hitting the screw driver handle with a hammer. The first attempt ruined the Craftsman screw driver. Another mechanic loaned me his Snap-On. I finished the job with his screw driver and it still looked as good as it did when he loaned it to me. I never bought another Craftsman tool since
Your mileage may vary.
R.C.
On Mon, 12 Dec 2005 05:02:38 GMT, "Leon"

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On Mon, 12 Dec 2005 15:47:47 -0600, Richard Cranium

Craftsman Phillips head screwdrivers are the worst. I was never able to use one for more than a half dozen screws (sometimes fewer) before it was significantly degraded.
The first time I put a Klein on a screw I knew I had to buy a whole new series of screwdrivers (a not insignificant task--I have screwdriver sets in the shop, in the garage, in the computer room, in the Explorer, in my electrical pouch, in my geek--TV/phone--bucket, in my tower climbing belt, and in the radio room).
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
  Click to see the full signature.
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The only Craftsman tools I own are over 25 years old. When my father passed on last year, his oldr Craftsman, Williams,Fairmount, and Thorsan tools added to my own. Afterspending a fews, ok a few weeks, sorting all them out, all the Tiawan, china, kmart crap left over got put into a big box to got the auction house.
Keep all the good stuff, no such thing as to many tool, just not enough storage.
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Not commenting on this thread, but the usual Snap-On vs Craftsman threads...
I am not a 'professional'... I buy the tools I like and make enough to afford the Snap-On when I get the urge to splurge...
I have mostly Craftsman, but have everything else from HF on up...
I hate it when 'pro's tell stories how they broke a Craftsman chrome socket with an impact wrench...
If I say a 'pro' do that sh$% to my car, I would probably beat (him/her) senseless with one of my 'cheap' tools....
Calling yourself a pro and giving up examples of non-pro work is senseless...
In my opinion, if you aren't wrenching for a Formula-1 or other 'Pro' racing team, you are just are not...
Richard Cranium wrote:

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Ahhh, but consider trying to replace that Snap-On, Mac or Cornwell etc tool and how long it takes for that guy to come back on his mobile circuit, vs going to a Sears store (provided you have one in your locale) to replace it. Snap-On and many others are great tools, but I found Craftsman to be the best bargain and value, and never once had a problem replacing one, even when I used a cheater and screwed up a wrench or broke a socket myself. They were also a whole lot cheaper than the others. John
Richard Cranium wrote:

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wrote:

About an hour, if I phone and say it's urgent.
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John DeBoo wrote:

Are you talking about the line of sockets and wrenches that say Craftsman on the side, and which are sold at Sears, that have the sockets routinely fall off the wrenches because the toleralances are large enough to throw a cat through? The same set where you have to hold the socket with your fingers while racheting because it takes so much goddam pressure to "disengage" the ratchet?
Is THAT the line you're talking about? Cause that's the line I have. Did I buy the wrong line of Craftsman?
You used them as a mechanic for many years. Which probably means you bought them many years ago, back when they actually were good tools.
Times change, John. Perhaps you haven't?
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On 13 Dec 2005 13:02:22 -0800, wood snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Well, I'm not a tool gatherer, but more a tool user who found that Sears Craftsman power tools (mid 1980's to probably about 1995 -- don't have any experience since then, my momma didn't raise no fool) a) didn't work for their application without significant tweaking or compensating for tool shortcomings, and b) were cheap and not "cheap" as in "inexpensive", but "cheap" as in poorly constructed, throw-away tools that didn't last long or hold tolerances well.
The fact that I might from time to time warn people away from Craftsman tools in no way reflects any element of tool snobbery or other attititude -- it simply seeks to make sure that other people don't throw money away on a tool for which they will curse the day they laid eyes on it. As someone else has said, "I'm too poor to buy cheap stuff".
Maybe Sears will turn the corner and change again for the better after exploiting the Craftsman name and making the phrase "value engineering" a term of derision. I'll let others be the guinea pigs though, I'm not going to take that risk.

That paragraph was worth about 25 points. :-) You'll fit in fine in this group.

+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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I didn't ask if you were happy with them, just who made them.

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Sears is a retailer, not a manufacturer. The three-digit prefix before the model number on each Sears-branded item indicates who made it. Here's a list of the codes:
http://www.owwm.com/Craftsman/Manufacturers-Name.asp
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the model numbers on many of the tools that I refered to begin with 943 or 094 or 43.. depending on how you read their numbers (ie. a 3/8" 1/2" 6 point socket carries the Sears item number of #0944055 and the mfg number #44055. This does not correspond to any number on that web page.

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