Control Panel Project

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I don't know what the "Borg" is. I don't know how durable sign boards are, but I will not be painting the finished project. And as far as my application goes, strength where I join two pieces together lengthwise is the main issue. In that respect, I still don't know how MDO compares to the plywoods I listed.
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
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"Searcher7" wrote:

application goes, strength where I join two pieces together lengthwise is the main issue. In that respect, I still don't know how MDO compares to the plywoods I listed.
There are lots of ways to get a strong joint with the right materials.
Physically go to a real lumber yard and look at some MDO.
Definitely NOT a Borg or home center item.
Lew
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Searcher7 wrote:

I think what Lew is trying to say is that you may find it to be cheaper than high-grade plywood, and since your cabinet/control panel isn't going to be exposed to the elements/rain, it may be a viable alternative for you.
It's not the same as 7 or 11 or 13 layer ply, but the fact that it has a poly (or vinyl, or whatever artifical cover is on it) surface on one side that is absolutely made for painting.. It'd probably be worth trying to track some down and see it for yourself.
Then again, I could be wrong and he might be meaning something else, but I suspect I'm semi-close to the mark.
Jason Buckler Marietta, GA
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Yes, he did say it would be cheaper than Baltic Birch plywood. MDO is supposed to be an exterior grade plywood, so I guess that exposure to the elements shouldn't be a problem anyway.
Nevertheless, if I can't make a stronger joint than with all the all the materials I listed, then I can't see it being worth the higher cost.

That wouldn't be an advantage for me, since I will not be painting the finished project.
In fact, since I intend to put adhesive vinyl on it that means I'd have to round over the entire length.(I hope that compromising the surface layer of the MDO that way won't create a problem?
Perhaps I should go with a bevel box joint instead of the groove/ rabbet.
Any ideas what material I should use as a glue block?
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
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On Sun, 15 Jun 2008 14:41:13 -0700 (PDT), Searcher7

From the photos, it looks like plain ol' decent quality sanded plywood, wrapped with a vinyl or paper.
Be aware that plywood is very strong, and more stable than solid wood. Most guitar amps, PA cabinets, pinball machines, wood jukeboxes, instrument and equipment "flight" cases, etc... have plywood carcases under a protective or decorative finish. The finish can be paint, vinyl, melamine or other laminates, fine wood, even coated paper.
Your photos look exactly like every guitar amp I've seen with the vinyl peeled off.
If you're wrapping it and the item isn't intended for portability, MDF is a fantasically stable substrate with very friendly working properties, as well as super cheap.
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The veneer in over the plywood in those pics is covered with vinyl artwork.
When I had a lumber guy at HD look at the control panel some years ago, he said he thought it was "BC plywood", which he didn't have.(Is "BC plywood" the cabinet Birch plywood you are referring to?).
MDF is notoriously known for being what was used by game cabinet manufacturers who were trying to cut costs.
Damage to these cabinets is almost always to the MDF portions.
And none of them ever used MDF for the control panel which is known to take punishment.(And definitely don't get this material wet).
I should have taken pics of the 3/4" (4' x 8') Hardwood Birch Plywood I saw at HD. The edges did look pretty solid.
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
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On Sun, 15 Jun 2008 16:11:42 -0700 (PDT), Searcher7

BC is pine plywood, with a "B" and a "C" grade face.
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