Comments on Sketchup

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On 10/2/10 2:13 PM, Swingman wrote:

http://picasaweb.google.com/karlcaillouet/HutchEndCabinets?authkey=Gv1sRgCOGisIKLveDykgE #
great work. I love simplicity, straight lines, and sharp corners. The Shakers would be proud. :-)
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-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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-MIKE- wrote:

Yep, beautiful work...you could put those bases under anything and it would look good!
Bill
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On 10/2/2010 2:19 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Thanks, Mike ... yes, I'm a fan of simplicity myself. These are simplicity in style, and in construction, and exactly what the client wanted.
And since she had a hand in the design via SU, there will be no surprises when I drive them up to Austin tomorrow. :)
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Looks great Swing. SU earns its keep doing things this way, huh? Did I tell you that Vectorworks imports SU files?
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That means I can cut fancypants wigglyboos on my cnc from SU.
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On 10/2/2010 5:56 PM, Robatoy wrote:

There's a guy on the sketchucation named charly2008 using a SU plugin called Curviloft to do the basic SU drawings for some amazing renderings.
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I have worked in the CAD software business for 20 years at my real job and have expertise in and have worked for some of the biggest CAD companies in this industry. Sketchup is by far the best at what it does. However, it is not really production CAD and especially as it relates to making drawings. I can create models in many of the most expensive 3D modelers and I prefer to use Sketchup for my own home work. However, I also use AutoCAD to make all my 2D drawings. I re- draw every part, measured from the Sketchup drawing. I believe I could save directly to AutoCAD from Pro Sketchup but I just use free version and can likely draw 2D faster in AutoCAD than the copy process would take.
For your case, you should make all pieces into components. The use the Outliner Tool under the Window menu to control the visibility of individual or groups fo components for creating drawings. I don't know if dimensions and text can have visibility controlled with Outliner because I don't do any of that in Sketchup, just models but if they can, then you have a total solution.
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On 9/15/2010 3:07 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

The Pro version indeed addresses these issues with "Layout".
However, I too have used various 2D CAD programs down through the years (SU is not really "CAD" per se, it is 3D modeling software), and indeed find the SU/Layout combination a bit more fussy when doing a full blown set of _2D_ construction drawings ... although I have done just that as recently as last year for a house I completed last year.
I think that is probably more of a lack of operator proficiency on my part with Layout, as it is indeed another learning curve and I don't use it on a daily basis.
All said and done however, SU has been more than worth that bit of fuss for the _3D_ side of things.
... what you make on the banana's, you lose on the oranges. ;)
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With anything worth learning it takes time, your mileage may vary. I came from AutoCAD LT, thought it was easy to learn but learning Sketchup was damn easy. It all depends on your drafting and CAD background. I have quite a bit of experience with several CAD and CAD style programs, Sketch us definately worth learning.

If you properly make each part of the project into a component, exploding takes little time. I typically can manually explode a 100 + part project in a couple of minutes. Keep in mind that you do no have to dimension you parts to understand their actual sizes. There are numerous plugins for Sketchup that will determine the number of pieces and the sizes each needs to be, I use Cutlist 4.0 as that plugin and that will give you what you need to know. However I take it a step farther and use Cutlist 4.0 to creat an import file for Cutlist Plus for determined cut lists and cost and sale reports. You need not explode a project for Cutlist 4.0 to do it's magic.

See above

You do not need seperate files, you simply need to copy what you want, to another area of the drawing. You have an infinite drawing area with each file.

See above, what manipulations are you talking about?
It does help to give each component a material name to seperate components make of different materials.
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If you are really interested in the designers improving the product, may I suggest posting your comment directly to Google, in addition to here. Posting here gets real user information from people doing the same type of projects, but I suspect Google rarely dives into Usenet groups.
There are numerous free tutorials available and, if you don't mind shelling out the money, Popular Woodworking has a CD(DVD?) tutorial focused on woodworking. Intro and advanced at $25 a disk. I've not seen them and have no relationship to the company.
Link to Book: http://www.woodworkersbookshop.com/product/woodworkers-guide-to-google-sketchup /
Link to Tutorials: http://www.woodworkersbookshop.com/product/shop-class-on-demand-sketch-up-part-one-get-started-download /
You can download the tutorial.
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Lobby Dosser wrote:

http://www.woodworkersbookshop.com/product/woodworkers-guide-to-google-sketchup /
http://www.woodworkersbookshop.com/product/shop-class-on-demand-sketch-up-part-one-get-started-download /
I tried learning from the tutorials, and I did. But there were numerous subtle but very valuable details that I got from the book(s) that I would probably have never picked up from watching the videos. Surely having access to both resources is good. When you start counting the number of hours which one can put into this, the cost of the media seems to become less material. The only books I've used so far are the "dummys" book and the "cookbook" book. I may get the woodworkers book mentioned above. I didn't really enjoy reading the "dummys" book that much--but I picked up some important details from it.
Bill
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