Circular saw won't ground, safe?

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Glad I'm not the only one that does that.

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Neither of you are (the only one). I do, too. It's too easy to check, and the potential consequences of not checking are too high.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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I always double and triple check everything including a final check with a non contact voltage tester. I've seen so many wierd things working on clients electrical setups. You know the "What in the F......" moment and its another one for the books. This sounds like a pertinent case: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/face/stateface/wi/93wi214.html "A 45-year-old male electrician (the victim) was electrocuted when he contacted an energized -inch metal-cased electric drill.... There were puddles of water on the cement floor of the work site. The drill was connected to a temporary power pole by a series of three extension cords, two of which were missing the ground pin.... The cords were plugged into a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) receptacle mounted on the power pole. ... However, testing after the incident disclosed the GFCI was inoperative, and the fuse box for the 120 volt single phase 15- and 20-ampere receptacle outlets located at the power pole contained two 40-ampere fuses."
Richard
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In home accidents in the U.S., one death in every hundred is the result of an electrical shock from 110 or 220 volt sources.
Injuries from electric shock account for about 1000 deaths annually in the United States and comprise about 5% of admissions to burn centres. More than 60% of reported electrical injuries are due to electrocution with 110- or 220-V current and most commonly result from failure to ground tools or appliances properly or from using electrical devices near water. Electrocution is the fifth leading cause of fatal occupational injuries in the United States; 1% of household accidental deaths are caused by electrical injuries.
The spectrum of clinical injury from accidental electrical shock ranges from a transient unpleasant sensation after exposure to low-intensity current to sudden death due to cardiac arrest. Clinical manifestations are sometimes seen immediately after contact, but might not become apparent until several hours after injury.
Source: Fish R. "Electric Shock. Part I: physics and pathophysiology", Journal of Emergency Medicine, 1993, vol. 11, pp. 309-12.
--
Benoit Evans

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So you're saying that toller's "research" had a few holes in it? Imagine my surprise.

-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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Absolutely. The exact same concept applies to guns: "If there's even the slightest doubt about whether it could be loaded, then *IT IS* until proven otherwise."
If there's even the slightest doubt that a pair of wires might be hot, then *THEY ARE* until proven otherwise.
Any other assumption in either case is stupidity on a scale you only read newspaper articles about. Usually articles ending "Services will be provided by <insert name> funeral home."
--
Don Bruder - snipped-for-privacy@sonic.net - New Email policy in effect as of Feb. 21, 2004.
Short form: I'm trashing EVERY E-mail that doesn't contain a password in the
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I have been told there are old pilots and bold pilots, but not many who were both. My father said the same thing about electricians.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Don Klipstein wrote:

No, but I've met a few who were "Moldy oldie electricians". ;-)
--
Former professional electron wrangler.

Michael A. Terrell
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On Sat, 21 May 2005 04:22:02 +0000, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

They check for live circuits with the back of their hand, so that when they clench, it's away from the conductor. ;-)
Cheers! Rich
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On Sun, 15 May 2005 22:33:16 +0000, Don Bruder wrote:

The guy that taught me to shoot had this maxim:
"On a range, loaded guns don't kill people. Only unloaded ones"
--
"Electricity is of two kinds, positive and negative. The difference
is, I presume, that one comes a little more expensive, but is more
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On Sat, 21 May 2005 15:14:50 +0100, Fred Abse wrote:

Whoever said "guns don't kill people" was full of shit. Of course they do, that's what they're for.
The problem is stupid people and the governments that they elect killing the _wrong_ people.
Thanks, Rich
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Mine don't. Left alone, they just lay there. You must be talking about the new animated ones, the ones with free will. Never seen one.
message

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Nonsense. When has a gun ever pulled its own trigger?
As to "what they're for"... most of mine are for killing deer. At least in theory. In practice, it seems that for the most part, they're just for making my arms tired while I sit in a tree stand. Kill people? Yeah, they'd probably work for that, too, but I don't plan to find out.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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No doubt.

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In fact, I do more than that: I plug my tester into something that I'm sure *is* live, to make sure it lights up when it's supposed to, before using on something that I believe to be not live.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

That's exactly the same thing I do. I don't even trust voltmeters or testers. I want to see them work first. THAT is how electricity is handled.
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On Mon, 16 May 2005 23:34:07 -0400, Robatoy wrote:

I read something in one of those "home handyman" articles about when you're working on the wiring in, say, a bedroom, but the breaker panel is in the basement, and not labeled well. You get a line- operated radio, and plug it in in the room you want to deenergize, and turn it up loud enough so you can hear it from the basement. Switch off the breakers one at a time, and when you've got the right one, the radio will quit. If any given breaker doesn't turn off the radio, you can turn it back on so you can still see your way up the stairs, of course. :-)
Cheers! Rich
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Yes, that works -- but one of these is a *lot* easier: http://www.lowes . com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId334-1781-GET-1200
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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And who says the breaker box was labeled correctly or labeled at all.
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Good point. My breaker box and subpanels are labelled correctly *now*, but they sure weren't when we bought this house. At least a *few* of them were labelled, and most of those correctly - the two previous houses had *nothing* labelled.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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